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Full text of "Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New Hampshire"

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Adjutant, Inspector, and Quartermaster General, 

State of New Hampshire. 



REPORT 



Adjutant-General 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE, 



THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 1, 1868 




MANCHESTER: 
JOHN B. CLARKE, STATE PRINTER. 

1868. 



State of New-Hampshire. 

Secretary op State's Office, 

Concord, May 26, 1868. 

Sir, — By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 
5, chapter 5, General Statutes of this State, I hereby 
authorize you to print twenty hundred copies of the Report 
of the Adjutant, Inspector, and Quartermaster General, for 
the year ending June 1, 1868, for the use of the State. 

JOHN D. LYMAN, 

Secretary of State. 
John B. Clarke, State Printer. 



1 






V 



\S 



1386694 



General Headquarters State of New-Hampshire. 
Adjutant-General's Office, 

Concord, May 19, 1868. 
His Excellency Walter Harriman, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 
Governor, — I have the honor herewith to submit to 
you, and through you to the Honorable Legislature of this 
State, my annual report as Adjutant, Inspector, and Quarter- 
master General, for the year ending June 1, 1868. 

Hoping the suggestions and recommendations therein 



made will receive the favorable consideration of yourself 



and of the Honorable Legislature, 



^V I remain, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

NATT HEAD, 
Adjutant, Inspector, and Quartermaster G-eneral. 



INDEX 

TO 

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S REPORT 



FJLTtrr FIRST, 

A 

PAGE. 

Abstracts and return 82 

Abstract A, articles purchased .... 83 

B, property found and taken up 85 

C, in possession of militia , 87 

D, transferred or issued 92 

E, lost or destroyed 100 

F, in possession of independent organizations .... 102 

G, turned in by militia 

H, issued to independent organizations, &c 104 

Annual enrolment 66 

Appointments in regular army 74 

B 

Battle-flags 16 

Battle-flags, resolution relative to 16 

c 

Circular relative to reception of General Sheridan ....... 44 

Clerical expenses 66 

Conclusion 122 

Corrections '. 4 

D 

Discipline 63 

E 

Encampments 34 

orders relative to 34 

of First Regiment 35 

Enrolment 66 

I 

Inspector-General's report 39 

Inspection of armories 44 

Inspection, May 54 



VI 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



L 

PAGE. 

List of appointments in regular army 74 

M 

May inspection 54 

Militia and Militia Law IT 

necessity for a well-organized 57 

expense of 60, 67 

government and maintenance of 61 

proposed tax to support 61 

proposed amendments to 62 

Military displays 43 

education in schools 63 

records 10 



Office, necessity of continuing .• . . . 3 

Office, duties of 3 

Old military records 10 

Old military records, resolution relative to 10, 11 

Orders relative to Smyth Guards 18 

relative to encampment 34 

relative to inspection of armories 45 

relative to change of tactics 56 

regimental 37 

Q 

Quartermaster-General's report . 80 

R 

Records, old military 10 

Report of Inspector-General 39 

inspection of armories ; 44 

Colonel T. L. Livermore 45 

Colonel H. O. Kent 50 

Adjutant Haines 52 

Resolution relative to old military records in Secretary's office .... 10 

Resolution relative to the State military records at Washington .... 11 

Return, annual, of stores 105 

Roster of Volunteer Militia 19 

General staff 19 

First Brigade 20 

First Regiment, field and staff 20 

Company A 21 

Company B 21 

Company C 21 

Company D 22 

Company E 22 

Company F 22 

Company G 22 

Company H 23 

Company I 23 

Company K 23 

Company L 23 

Company M 24 






INDEX — PART FIRST. Yll 

PAGE. 

Roster of companies attached to First Regiment ....... 24 

First Company Cavalry 24 

Lafayette Artillery 24 

First Light Battery, section B . ........ 24 

Second Regiment, field and staff ........ 25 

Company A 26 

Company B 26 

Company C . . „ . . . . . . 26 

Company D ......... 26 

Company E 27 

Company F 27 

Company G ...»,'■.... 27 

Company H .27 

Company I 27 

Company K . 28 

Company L 28 

Company M ......... 28 

Companies attached to Second Regiment ....... 29 

Parker Guards 29 

Newfound Lake Rifles 29 

First Light Battery, section A ......... 29 

Clark Guards, unattached 25 

Independent organizations .......... 30 

Governor's Horse Guards, field and staff 30 

■ Company A . . . . . . . 31 

Company B .31 

Company C 31 

Amoskeag Veterans, field and staff ........ 32 

Company A 32 

Company B . 33 

Company C 33 

Company D ........ 33 

Company E 33 

T 

Testimonials 15 

Transmittal of Report 1 

y 

Volunteer Militia, roster of . ........... IS 1 



INDEX TO TEXT MATTEE. 



T^IRT SECOND. 

A 

PAGE. 

Acts passed by Assembly of Indian Stream 277 

Adjutant-Generals of New-Hampshire 381 

Aggregate forces of Volunteer Militia 377 

Alarm at Portsmouth 127 

Answer of majority in the House to Gov. Plumer's Message 33 

Answer of minority of the same 34 

Attack on Portsmouth feared 24, 95, 98, 105, 106 

on Fort Megs 100 

on Little York * 100 

on Fort George 100 

on Sackett's Harbor 102 

of Admiral Cockburne 102 

B 

Battle of Tippecanoe " 25 

of Brownstown 29 

ofFrcnchtown 99 

of Perry on Lake Erie 103 

of the Thames 103 

of Chrystler's Field 104 

with Indians by General Jackson 105 

of Chippewa 2:9 

of Niagara 232 

of Plattsburg .240 

of Lake Cham plain 240 

of New Orleans 241 

of Fort Erie, or sortie at 271 

ofFortDrane . ^ 290 

of Wahoo . 294 

of Lake Monroe, and death of Lieutenant J. "W. S. McNeil .... 296 

of Monterey . 323 

of Buena Vista 327 

of Cerro Gordo 332 

ofContreras 349 

ofChurubusco 351 

of Molino de Rey 252 

Bedel's, General, grant of settlement at Indian Stream 271 

Bombardment of Vera Cruz 331 

British attack on the "Chesapeake" 102 

cruisers off Atlantic coast 105 

go up the Connecticut 105 

claim Indian Stream Territory, and locate town there .... 272 



INDEX PART SECOND. IX 

C 

PAGE. 

Campaign of General Taylor 321 

Campaign of General Scott 330 

Campaign of 1814 • 229 

Capture of Philip and lichee Billy 298 

Chalco Lake, march of General Scott south of 347 

Chepultepec, storming of 353 

Company officers complete of Bedel's regiment in the spring of 1778 . . . 391 

Committee from Indian Stream 276 

Croghan's, Major, defence of Fort Stephenson ........ 102 

D 

Davis's regiment of volunteers 71 

Death of Col. Ransom 334 

Declaration of war, 1812 . 5 

Defeat at Beavers' Dam 102 

Defence at Sackett's Harbor 102 

Detachments of militia made 6,13,17,19,21 

Detachments for defence of Portsmouth 13,17 

Detention of Pierce's Brigade at Vera Cruz ........ 339 

Detroit retaken 103 

Disbanding New-Hampshire volunteer regiments 81 

Discharge of detachments of troops at Portsmouth 92 

of posts at Stewartstown . . 91-93 

of militia by report of committee on letters of Secretary of War . .123 

Drayton, town of 272 

E 

Excitement on the seacoast 24 

Expedition from Plattsburg into Canada . 32 

Expedition against Queenstown 30 

Extra session of Congress, 1811 5 

F 

Force ordered against Indians, 1811 25 

Fort Erie taken possession of by General Brown 229 

G 

Gilman's, Governor, message upon the war 96 

Gilman, Governor, orders out militia for defence of Portsmouth . . . 106-110 

Governor Badger's message as to difficulties of Indian Stream .... 278 

Governors and Presidents of New-Hampshire from 1680 to 1867 .... 380 

, Grant of territory to General Bedel 270 

Grant and Loomis, respecting acts of 273 

Guard of Little Harbor 99 

H 

Hereford, town of, in Canada 275 

Hull, General, invades Canada 28 

Hull, General, retreats and surrenders 31 

Hull, Commodore, letters of, to Governor 105-109 



x adjutant-general's report. 

I 

PAGE. 

Indian Stream War 269 

Territory, settlement of 269 

people resist sheriff 275 

Independent government at Indian Stream 274 

Indictment against prisoners taken at Indian Stream 286 

Information of Noah E. Smith 347 

J 

Jaffrey's Point, battery at 226 

L 

Lafayette, General, authorized to lead an expedition into Canada in 1788 . . 390 
Lafayette, General, orders General Bedel to raise a thousand men for the expedi- 
tion 390 

Landing of General Pierce near Vera Cruz 339 

L aw as to Militia, supervision by Judge Smith 242 

1819 244 

1820 246 

1829 256 

1842 301 

. 1846 and '47 320 

1850 356 

1857 368 

Law of the Revised Statutes, 1842 30o 

Letters from Governor Goodwin as to raising troops in 1861 379 

Letters from Colonel George Reed as to the surrender of Yorktown . . . 387 

Limits of the several regiments, 1842 302-308 

M 

March of Pierce's Brigade from Vera Cruz to Puebla 340 

March of General Scott to Mexico 347 

Massacre of Major Dade's command 290 

McNeil wounded 235 

Mexican War 321 

Mexico, surrender of 355 

Militia virtually abolished, 1846 320 

Militia re-established, 1847 320 

Miller, gallant feat of 235 

Maritime defence, committee on 122 

Municipal regulations established 273 

N 

Narrows, forts and troops at 227 



Organizations of detached militia 7, 13, 23 

First Regiment N. H. V 70 

Militia, 1820 247 

Militia, 1829 262 

Militia, 1842 307 



INDEX — PART SECOND. XI 

PAGE. 

Organization of Militia, 1851 357 

Militia, 1858 369 

Militia, 1860 369 

Amoskeag Veterans 367 

Governor's Horse Guards 369 

P 

Peace, treaty of, 1814 241 

Pierce, Col. Benjamin, gallant conduct of 290 

Perry's victory 113 

Petition for majority and minority to the Governor 278 

Portsmouth Plains, troops at 227 

Plumer, Gov William, makes requisition for arms .32 

Plumer's explanation of action in calling out troops ...... 32 

Plumer's message upon war , ... 33 

R 

Rangers of the Revolution 394 

Pea, Justice, of Hereford, Canada 275 

Recruiting of Ninth United States Infantry . . . . . . . .332 

Recruiting Eleventh Regiment 35 

Report of committee on defence of Portsmouth 97 

Armstrong's letter 122 

Commissioners sent to investigate matters at Indian Stream . . . 278 

Gen. Low as to difficulties at Indian Stream 288 

Resolutions of Legislature upon peace 242 

on Indian Stream Territory 278 

Congress authorizing expedition into Canada under Gen. Stark, in 

1777 388 

Ropewalk, South, troops at 227 

Roll of Capt. Robert Neal's company 14 

Samuel Shackford's company 15 

Joseph Towle's company 16 

John Leonard's company 18 

Joseph Towle's company 19 

E. H. Mahurin's company 21 

Roll of staff of Eleventh Regiment 36 

Company officers and privates of Eleventh Regiment .... 37-59 

Capt. John McNeil's company 37-41 

John W. Weeks's company 41-43 

Joseph Beeman's company 44 

George Howard's company 45 

Samuel H. Holley's company 46 

Joseph Griswold's company 47 

Samuel Gordon's company 48 

Phinehas Williams's company 50 

Lieut. V. R. Goodrich's company 52-54 

Capt. Charles Follett's company 55-56 

Capt. Benjamin F. Edgerton's company 57-58 

Consolidation of Eleventh and Twenty-second Regiments . ... 59 

Capt. Jonathan Stark's company 59 

Lieut. Malachi Coming's company 62 

Capt. John Bliss's company 64 

Richard Bean's company 66 

V. R. Goodrich's company 68 

Jonathan Eastman's detachment 70 

Field and staff officers New-Hampshire regiment volunteers ... 71 



xii adjutant-general's report. 

PAGE. 

Roll of Capt. Elislia Smith's company 72 

Thomas Currier's company . . . . ■ 73 

Joseph. Smith's company 74 

Joseph Flanders' company . . 75 

Benjamin Bradford's company 

Lemuel B. Mason's company 79 

Lieut. Jonathan Butterfield's company 80 

Field and staff of Col. McCobb's or Forty-fifth Regiment .... 81 
Company officers and privates of Forty-fifth Regiment .... 82-91 

Capt. Benjamin Bradford's company 28 

Joseph Flanders' company . 84 

Nathan Stanley's company 85 

Smith Elkins' company 87 

Daniel Holden's company 88 

Sergt. -Major Kelley's company 90 

Edmund Freeman's company at Stewartstown 93 

Samuel Shackford's company 15 

William Marshall's company 94 

William Marshall's guard 99 

Samuel Shackford's company 107 

William Marshall's company , 108 

Field and staff of Col. Long's regiment of detached troops . . .111 
Company officers and privates of Col. Long's regiment . . 112-121 

Capt. Allen Goss' company 112 

George Evans' company 113 

Vincent Meserve's company • 114 

Jacob Dearborn's company 115 

Andrew Pierce's company 116 

Peter Hersey's company 118 

Bradbury Bartlett's company 119 

Phirehas Webster's company • 121 

William Marshall's company for defence of Portsmouth . . . 124 

James Hardy's company 126 

John S. Davis' company 129 

Gen. Montgomery's staff in the brigade of detached militia . . . 132 

Field and staff officers in the First Regiment detached militia . . 132 
Company officers and soldiers in First Regiment detached militia . 133-155 

Capt Timothy Putnam's company 133-155 

Jonathan Bean's company 135 

Samuel Collins' company 137 

Phinehas Stone's company 139 

Nathan Glidden's company 141 

N. G. Bradley's company 143 

Hugh Moore's company 145 

Josiah Converse' company 147 

Oliver Warren's company 149 

Joseph Kimball's company 151 

John Marsh's company 153 

Field and staff officers of Second Regiment detached militia . . . 155 

Company officers and soldiers in same 155 

Capt. James M. Warner's company 155 

Edward Fuller's cun pan y 157 

Jonathan Godfrey's company 159 

Lieut. Asa Head's detachment 161 

Capt. Reuben Marshall's company 162 

Samuel Aiken's company 164 

James Trivett's company 166 

Silas Call's company 168 



INDEX — PART SECOND. Xlll 

PAGE. 

Roll of Capt. "William Gregg's company 170 

Field and staff officers of Third Regiment of detached militia . . 172 

Company officers and soldiers of same . . ' 173-186 

Capt. William Coursou's company 173 

Jacob Dearborn's company 175 

John D. Harty's company 177 

John Bassett, jr. 's, company . . . 178 

John Willey's company 181 

Joshua Meriam's company 183 

Ware Dearborn's company 189 

Field and staff officers of Fourth Regiment of detached militia . .187 

Company officers and soldiers in same 185 

Capt. John D. Harty's company 188 

Andrew Nute's company 190 

Joseph Smith's company 191 

John Wingate's company 192 

John W. Hayes's company 193 

Paul Montgomery's company 193 

William Wiggin's company 197 

Alfred Smith's company 198 

Job C. Waldron's company 199 

John Haven's company 201 

William Courson's company 203 

Thomas Parmelee's company 205 

Field and staff officers of Fifth Regiment detached militia . . .206 

Company officers and soldiers in same 207-215 

Capt. Christopher Flanders' s company 207 

Jonathan Nason's company 208 

Philip Towle's company 209 

Stephen Brown's company 211 

Samuel James's company 212 

Field and staff officers of Maj. Sias's battalion of detached militia . . 213 

Company officers and soldiers in same 220 

Capt. David Haynes's company 220 

Josiah Bellows's company 222 

Lieut. Nathaniel Burley's company 224 

Capt. Reuben Hayes's company 225 

James Mooney's company 288 

Field and staff officers of Ninth United States Infantry .... 333 

Company officers and soldiers of same 333 

Capt. Daniel Batchelder's company 337 

Capt. Stephen Woodman's company 337 

Field and company officers of Amoskeag Veterans 374 

Capt. Tobey's company, Twenty-first United States Regiment . . . 397 
Men from New-Hampshire in rifle and grenadier companies of the 

Ninth United States Infantry 400 

s 

Sailing of "North Bend" and "Kepler" 335 

Special committee on detached militia 122 

Staff of Gov. Gilman, 1814 227 

Sortie of Erie 238 

T 

Tecumseh killed by Col. Johnson 103 

Tower. Walbach's 226 



xiv adjutant-general's report. 

w 

PAGE. 

War on Northern and "Western frontiers, 1812 24 

War Department, letters from 122 

in Florida 289 

at Indian Stream 269 

Whitcomb's corp of Independent Rangers in the Revolution 392 



INDEX TO NOTES. 



A 

PAGE. 

Andrews, General Samuel 311 

Arroyo . . • 321 

Ayer, Major Samuel H 311 

B 

Badger, Governor William 282 

Baker, Colonel N. B 314 

Barker, Colonel T. A 307 

Bartlett, Judge Bradbury 119 

Bartlett, Colonel Ichabod 187 

Bartlett, Colonel Richard 247 

Bartlett, Colonel Thomas 23 

Bassett, Captain John . . 28 

Batchelder, Captain Daniel 333 

Be lei, General John 336 

Bedel, Colonel Moody 238 

Bell, Chief Justice 256 

Bell, Hon. James 263 

Bell, Colonel Joseph 248 

Bliss, Colonel W. W. S 330 

Bowers, Colonel George 336 

Boyd, Colonel John P «. 27 

British cruising off Portsmouth 228 

Burke, Colonel Edmund 307 

Butler, General Henry 23 

Butler, James H 308 



c 



Carter, Colonel John 71 

Cass, General Lewis 103 

Cate, Colonel Asa P 318 

Clarke, Colonel Greenleaf 307 

Clark, Colonel Isaac 36 

Cilley, Colonel Bradbury 227 

Cilley, Colonel Joseph 236 

Crosby, Colonel Dixi 266 

Cutter, Dr. A. It. ... 23 

D 

Davis, General Aquila 70 

Dearborn, General 12 

Dinsmore, General Samuel 8, 9 

Dinsmore, Governor Samuel, jr 357 



xviii adjutant-general's report. 

T 

PAGE. 

Thorn, Lieutenant George 343 

Thorn, Captain James 218 

Towle, Captain Joseph 216 

Tuttle, Major Ben 311 

u 

TTpham, Timothy 7 

w 

Waldron, Colonel Isaac 18? 

"Waite, Major O. F. R 314 

Walker, Dr. J. D 334 

Walker, Lyman B 249 

Webster, Hon. Daniel 95 

Weeks, Major John N 41 

Wells, Colonel John S 318 

West, Lewis B 351 

Whipple, Colonel T. J 339 

White, Colonel John H 275 

Whittemore, General Aaron 314 

Wilson, Hon. J. M. 264 

Y 

Young, Colonel Ira .283 



ERRATA. 



Page 109— 2d line from the top of the page, read " Cochrane " instead of "Cockburne." 
132 — 4th and 17th lines from the bottom of the page, read " George K. Montgom- 
ery," instead of " George H. Montgomery." 
226 — 3d line from bottom of the page, read " point " instead of " port." 
228 — 10th and 11th lines from the top of the page, read " extending their preda- 
tory warfare southward, the main part of the troops," instead of 
" extended their predatory warfare southward. The main part of the 
troops." 
239— 16th line from the bottom of the page, read " two hundred and eleven/' 

instead of " twenty-four." 
246— 20th line from the bottom of the page, read "1819 " instead of " 1818." 
331 — 19th line from the top of the page, read "forts" instead of "foe." 



PART FIRST. 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S REPORT. 



General Headquarters State of New-Hampshire ; 
Adjutant, Inspector, and 

Quartermaster General's Office, 
Concord, June 1, 1868. 

To His Excellency Walter Harriman, 

Governor and Commander-in-chief. 

Governor, — In submitting this my Annual Report npon 
the condition of affairs pertaining to, and the public prop- 
erty in charge of, this office, I shall endeavor to make 
it as brief and succinct as possible. And,' in the first 
place, I deem it fitting to speak of the duties devolving 
upon, and performed in, this office during the year just past: 
and although I cannot expect that all will comprehend or 
appreciate the necessity of its continuation, since the 
late terrible civil strife is so happily ended, and knowing 
that for a period prior to the inauguration of that strife no 
active duty was required to be done here ; yet I hope to 
convince all thinking people, having at heart the best 
interests of the State and nation, that there does exist an 
imperative necessity for its continuation, and that the ex- 
pense of the same is not only unavoidable, but a saving to 
the State, as was shown in my Report for 1867. 

The legitimate business of the office for the pastyear has 
been, aside from that specially mentioned hereafter, of the 
same nature as that during the preceding year; nor can I 
say that I think there has been the least diminution. 

It has been so varied, that to mention it in detail would 
require a much larger volume than I propose to make; and 
I will therefore only cite a few of the leading features. 

The endless number of inquiries made by officials, claim- 



agents, late officers, soldiers, and sailors, or their heirs, 
relative to the enlistment, muster, service, and final dispo- 
sition of thousands of our braves, has occasioned much 
labor. 

The object of these inquiries is mainly to obtain infor- 
mation on which to ground applications for bounty, back 
pay, pensions, &c. ; and, in almost every case, requires cer- 
tificates, aside from letters of explanation. 

The number of letters written, of which copies have been 
retained, is upwards of twenty-five hundred; and of certif- 
icates given, upwards of two thousand. 

No call for information, from whatever source, has been 
unheeded, but in every instance has received the promptest 
attention ; and all information on file touching the points in 
question has been cheerfully given, which, although occa- 
sioning some little expense to the State, is but a trifle 
compared with that expended by Massachusetts and other 
States in assisting their volunteers. 

In Massachusetts and several other States, the State has 
not only furnished this information, but has borne the entire 
expense of prosecuting the claims of soldiers and their 
heirs against the municipal and general government. 

They have had State agents at Washington, with office 
and clerks, for this especial purpose, at the expense of the 
State ; and who will say but that the expense, however much 
or little, attending this recognition of the services of our 
soldiery, is justly, and in duty bound, due from each and 
every State ! 

We owe to them a debt of gratitude which we can never 
pay, and it has been a source of infinite pleasure to me to 
be able to do what lay in my power for this class of our 
citizens. 

As in the last year, many cases have been brought to my 
notice where injustice was done some officer or soldier by 
reason of erroneous returns having been made, and I have 
done all I could to set their record right. 

The following are some of the most important corrections 
made in the records during the past year, and should read 
as here given, instead of as formerly reported : — 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 5 

Capt. Geo. W. Estabrook, 1st Cavalry. Promoted to 
Captain July 15, 1864 ; wounded severely Sept. 29, 1864 ; 
honorably discharged by S. 0. No. 3, War Dept. A. G. 0. 
Jan. 4, 1865, " on account of physical disability from 
wounds received in action." 

Private Abiel A. Hannaford, H, 2d Regt. Re-enlisted 
Jan. 1, 1864; discharged at City Point, Va., Dec. 19, 
1865, by G. 0. No. 130, Dept. of Va. 

Captain John E. Wilbur, B, 3d. Disability result- 
ing from dismissal, removed Nov. 10, 1863. 

Private Philip A. Warner, K, 3d. Re-enlisted Feb. 
13, 1864. Discharged July 20, 1865, at Goldsborough, 
N. C, by S. 0. No. 113, C. S. Hd.-Qrs. Dept. of N. C. 

Private Horace G. Heath, E, 4th Re-enlisted Feb. 
15, 1864 ; discharged at Raleigh, N. C, Aug. 23, 1865, 
S. 0. No. 154. C. S. Hd.-Qrs. Dept. of N. C. 

Private Alvin R. Corliss, I, 4th. Re-enlisted Feb. 
15, 1864. Discharged at Concord, N. H., by S. 0. No. 154, 
C. S. Hd.-Qrs. Dept. of N. C, Aug. 23, 1865. 

Private John S. Loverin, I, 4th. Re-enlisted Feb. 
11, 1864. Wounded May 16, 1864 ; wounded Aug. 16, 
1864 ; discharged Aug. 23, 1865, at Concord, N. H., by S. 
0. No. 154, C. S. Hd.-Qrs. Dept. of N. C. 

Private George H. Lyman, I, 4th. Re-enlisted Dec. 
25, 1863 ; died at City Point, Va., April 17, 1865. 

Private Thomas B. Platts, K, 4th. Re-enlisted Feb. 
16,1864; discharged Aug. 23, 1865, at Raleigh, N. C, 
by §. 0. No. 113, C. S. Hd.-Qrs. Dept. of N. C. 

Private William S. Learned, C, 5th. Re-enlisted March 
29, 1864 ; discharged at Concord, N. H., June 28, 1815, S. 
0. No. 158, C. S. Army of the Potomac. 

Private Hp:nry T. Marsh, A, (3th- Recruit;" transferred 
to Co. C,Vet. Res. Corps, Jan. 24, 1865 ; discharged July 28, 
1865, at Trenton, N. J., by G. 0. No. 116, A. G. 0. June 
17, 1865. 

Private Peter Howarth, E, 7th. Re-enlisted Feb. 28, 



6 adjutant-general's report. 

1864 ; discharged at Goldsborough, N. C., July 20, 1865, 
by S. 0. No. 113, C. S. Hd.-Qrs. Dept. of N. C. 

Private Patrick Driscoll, C, 8th. Mustered out at 
Natchez, Mississippi, Dec. 31, 1864. 

Private Jacob T. Chandler, D, 8th. Promoted to corpo- 
ral ; re-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864 ; discharged at Natchez, Miss., 
Jan. 14, 1865, having been rendered supernumerary non- 
commissioned officer. 

Private Benjamin Bickford, E, 11th. Transferred to Co. 

F, 17th Regt. Vet. Res. Corps. Jan. 15, 1864 ; discharged 
at Indianapolis, Indiana, June 30, 1865, by G. 0. No. 116, 
dated W. D., A. G. 0., June 17, 1865, in the 1st Batt. Yet. 
Res. Corps. 

Private William Dickerman, E, 11th. Promoted to a 
corporal ; wounded severely June 2, 1864 ; captured at 
Pegram House, Ya., Oct. 1, 1864 ; discharged near Alex- 
andria, Ya., June 4, 1865, by S. 0. No. 22, series of 1865, 
District of Alexandria, Ya., and 9th A. C, and telegraphic 
order from War Department. 

Private Byron G. Ken yon, H,llth. Promoted to corpo- 
ral June 1, 1864 ; wounded severely June 16, 1864 ; dis- 
charged at Webster Gen. Hospital, Manchester, N. H., by 
surgeon's certificate of disability, per order W. D., A. G. 0., 
May 3, 1865. 

Private Eben L. Pardee, L, 1st Cav. Discharged at 
Concord, N. H., July 15, 1865, S. 0. No. 44, C. S.. under 

G. 0. 94, W. D. 

Bugler George A. Sargent, L, 1st Cav. Discharged at 
Concord, N. H., July 15, 1865, S. 0. 44, C. S. under G. 0. 
94, W. D ; re-enlisted veteran. 

Private Francis York, C, 1st H. A. Discharged at 
Washington, D. C, July 17, 1865, G. 0. No. 53, Mid. Mil. 
Div., dated Washington, D. C, May 30, 1865. 

Private John McGinnis, H, 3d. Recruit ; captured Aug. 
16, 1864 ; Paroled Oct. 7, 1864 ; discharged at Concord, 
N.H., July 20, 1865, by S. O.No. 113, Hd.-Qrs. Dept of N. C. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 7 

Private Hiram F. Flanders, A, 5th. Recruit ; wounded 
at Fredericksburg, Ya. ; transferred to Vet. Res. Corps ; 
discharged at Depot Camp, Y. R. C, Cliffburne Barracks, 
D. C, May 23, 1864, on certificate of disability. 

Private J. Edgar Hobson, E, 9th. Recruit ; transferred 
to 6th Regt. N. H. Y., June 1, 1865 ; discharged near 
Alexandria, Ya., July 17, 1865, by S. 0. No. 162, Hd.-Qrs. 
Dept. of Washington, D. C. 

Private Charles Forbes, E, 11th. Recruit ; died at Louis- 
ville, Ky., April 26, 1864 ; grave No. 56, range 49, Na- 
tional Cemetery, Louisville, Ky. 

Private William Meaney, E, 12th. Recruit ; wounded 
May 6, 1864 ; deserted near Petersburg, Ya., July 11, 
1864 ;, returned ; transferred to Co. K ; transferred to 2d 
N. H. V., June 21, 1865 ; transferred to Co. H, 13th Regt. 
Yet. Res. Corps ; discharged at Concord, N.H., Aug. 3, 1865, 
by G. 0., No. 116, War Dept. A. G. 0., June 11, 1865. 

Private John A. Sargent, E, 11th. Recruit ; wounded 
severely May 12, 1864 ; transferred to 6th N. H. V., 
June 1, 1865 ; discharged at Webster U. S. pen. Hospital, 
Manchester, N. H., June 5, 1865, on surgeon's certificate 
of disability, per order of W. D., A. G. 0., May 3, 1865. 

Private Sanford T. Barton, 13th Regt. Yet. Res. Corps ; 
discharged from Y. R. C. at Galloupe's Island, Boston Har- 
bor, Mass., Nov. 17, 1865, by G. 0. No. 155, A. G. 0., 
dated Oct. 26, 1865. 

Private Alonzo Barnard, F, 2d U. S. S. S. Re-enlisted 
Dec. 21, 1863 ; promoted to corporal ; wounded May 6, 1864 ; 
died of disease, Oct. 10, 1864. 

Private Geo. F. Brown, D, 4th. Re-enlisted Feb. 17, 
1864 ; wounded at Deep Run, Aug. 16, 1864, and taken 
prisoner ; died in the hands of the enemy, Aug. 20, 1864. 

Private W. B. Griffin, B, 15th. Died of disease, at 
United States Convalescent Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., 
July 16, 1863. 

Private S. M. Newland, I, 15th. Died of wounds, at 



8 adjutant-general's report. 

United States Convalescent Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., 
July 4, 1863. 

Private Wi. Dustin, F, 15th. Died of wounds, at United 
States, Convalescent Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., July 22, 
1863, instead of July 11, 1863, as formerly recorded. 

Private Geo. M. Swain, I, 15th. Died of wounds, at 
United States Convalescent Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., 
Aug. 4, 1863. 

Private Edwin M. Tucker, Yet. Res. Corps. Discharged 
Dec. 18, 1865, to enlist as hospital steward in United States 
Army. 

Private John A. Germon, F, 4th Regt. Recruit ; wounded 
and captured at Drury's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864 ; died of 
wounds, in rebel prison at Richmond, Va., Aug. 13, 1864. 

Private Jonah Camp, B, 15th. Died at Memphis, Tenn. ; 
interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, Tenn. 
Grave and date of death not known. 

Corporal Absolom Ford, C, 15th. Died at Memphis 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Stephen Church, C, 15th. Died at Memphis 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Daniel B. Gage, C, 15th. Died at Memphis 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Walter G. Brackett, D, 15th. Died at Memphis 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private William T. Stevens, D, 15th. Died at Memphis 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Henry T. Butterfield, E, 15th. Died at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Mem- 
phis, Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 9 

Private Almon S. Church, F, 15th. Died at Memphis, 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private John Marcott, F, 15th. Died at Memphis, Tenn. ; 
interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, Tenn. 
Grave and date of death not known. 

Private J. Gilbert Robie, F, 15th. Died at Memphis, 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private John J. Smith, 1, 15th. Died at Memphis, Tenn. ; 
interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, Tenn. 
Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Geo. M. D. Mead, K, 15th. Died at Memphis, 
Tenn. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Jesse H. Bennett, E, 16th. Died at Vicksburg, 
Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Elijah R. Messer, E, 16th. Died at Vicksburg, 
Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Corporal Robert A. French, G, 16th. Died at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Edward P. Kimball, G, 16th. Died at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Gardner Gove, H, 16th. Died at Vicksburg, 
Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Joseph S. Brooks, I, 16th. Died at Vicksburg, 
Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 

Private Francis S. Piper, I, 16th. Died at Vicksburg, 
Miss. : interred in the National Cemetery at Memphis, 
Tenn. Grave and date of death not known. 



10 

Private Samuel W. Waldron, K, 16th. Died at Vicks- 
burg, Miss. ; interred in the National Cemetery at Mem- 
phis, Term. Grave and date of death not known. 

Seventy General and one hundred and twenty-five Special 
Orders have been issued during the year, with an average of 
fifteen copies each, making in all two thousand nine hun- 
dred and twenty-five, aside from a large number of printed 
letters and circulars, and various blanks, &c, for the use of 
the militia, all of which require time and labor. 

OLD MILITAKY RECORDS. 

At the last session of the Legislature, the following joint 
resolution was passed: — 

" Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court convened: 

" Section 1 . That the Adjutant-General is hereby author- 
ized to procure the military records now on file in the office 
of the Secretary of State, and place them on file in his 
office." 

In accordance with the above resolution, I have gathered 
in all such records that I have been able to find, and prop- 
erly arranged, labelled, and filed the same, so far as time 
and the business of the office would admit. 

It will require, however, several months of patient, perse- 
vering labor to complete the work. More than forty bushels 
of miscellaneous papers have been examined, among which 
are found those belonging to the office of the Secretary of 
State, to the Treasurer's office, to the Executive Chamber, 
and even private documents, aside from those pertaining to 
this department, in a condition mixed and intermixed, bewil- 
dering and perplexing ; in fact, a conglomeration of miscel- 
laneous matter, marvellously heaped together, demonstrating 
the impolitic manner in which the records of this State 
have hitherto been kept, and the folly of half doing, or not 
doing at all, that which should be done at once and well done. 

No adequate idea can be formed of the amount of tedious, 



STATE OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 11 

persistent labor required in arranging and filing these 
papers ; but with this, as has been the case with every branch 
of the manifold duties of this office, I have deemed it a 
public necessity that the work should be done, and have 
done it to the best of my ability, and as I believed would 
best subserve the public good. What papers I have exam- 
ined and filed have been deposited in the fire-proof vaults 
of the office, where they can be preserved and referred to 
with ease at any time. 

More than four months have already been devoted to this 
work, but the improvement made amply repays the State. 

The following preamble and joint resolution was also 
passed at the same session : — 

A JOINT RESOLUTION IN RELATION TO THE MILITARY RECORDS 
OP THIS STATE AT WASHINGTON. 

" Whereas, certain books and papers were transmitted in 
1818 from the Secretary's office to the War Department at 
Washington, relating to the War of the Revolution, and it 
is supposed that some of those books and papers still remain 
in said department ; and, whereas, the rolls of the soldiers 
from this State in the war with Great Britain in 1812-15, 
and those of the soldiers in the Mexican War, as also those 
of our soldiers ordered to protect our frontier at Indian 
Stream, are in the War Department or Pension Office ; and, 
whereas, the interest of the people of this State requires 
that those books, papers, and rolls should be in our own 
public archives; therefore, — 

" Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
Qeneral Court convened : 

" Section 1. That the Adjutant-General be authorized to 
obtain from the War Department and Pension Office those 
books, papers, and rolls, or copies of them, and deposit the 
same in his office. 

u And be it further resolved, That the Governor, with the 
advice and consent of the Council, cause said papers, or 
such portions thereof, to be arranged and published, as, in 
their judgment, the interest of the people of this State 
may require; and that the Governor be authorized to draw 
his warrant upon the treasury for such an amount as shall 
cover the expenses of obtaining such books, papers^ records, 



12 adjutant-general's report. 

and rolls, or copies of them, and for arranging and publishing 
the same in the next Annual Report of the Adjutant-Gen- 
eral." (Approved July 5, 1867.) 

Under this authority I proceeded to Washington, and, 
although I eventually succeeded in obtaining copies of most 
of the rolls, experienced much and unlooked-for trouble. 

I first applied to Gen. Samuel Breck, having in charge 
the Roll Department, who referred me to Gen. E. D. Town- 
send, Assistant Adjutant-General. I told Gen. Townsend 
what I wanted, showed him the authority by which I made 
the request, and explained to him the importance and neces- 
sity of the State having in its possession copies, at least, of 
the rolls furnished the War Department through the cour- 
tesy of the State ; that the rolls belonged to the State, and 
were loaned the Department for the purpose of effecting a 
settlement with the General Government for the services 
rendered by the troops furnished by New-Hampshire, but 
had never been returned, consequently we had no means 
of determining who or how many of our citizens served in 
the War of 1812, the Indian Stream War, or the Mexican 
War ; and, in the name of the State, demanded copies or 
the originals. 

He informed me that it was contrary to the rules of the 
Department to allow any rolls or papers to be copied, giv- 
ing the reasons therefor, which in substance were, to pre- 
vent claim-agents and other parties from troubling or 
imposing upon the Department ; and positively declined to 
grant my request. 

I then called upon Senator Patterson, and made known 
to him my wants and the result of my visit at the War De- 
partment ; and he kindly volunteered to go with me to see 
Gen. Townsend, with a view of obtaining, if possible, a 
more favorable decision. He did so, and for more than an 
hour reasoned with Gen. Townsend on the subject; but no 
better result crowned his labors than had mine. 

Our next move was to lay the matter before Gen. Grant, 
then Acting Secretary of War, who at once sent an order to 
Gen. Townsend directing: him to furnish me such rolls and 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 13 

papers as I might wish to copy. This settled all contro- 
versy in that Department. 

Upon examination, however, I only found in the War 
Department the rolls of the Mexican War, and learned that 
those of the War of 1812 were in the office of the Third 
Auditor, Treasury Department, under the supervision of 
Hon. John Wilson, whom I found to be a perfect gentleman, 
ready and willing to aid me in every possible way, as was 
also the case with his clerks. They were very courteous, 
and rendered me valuable assistance in copying the rolls. 

The rolls of the Indian Stream War I found to be in the 
Second Auditor's office, in charge of E. B. French, who, 
although a native of New-Hampshire, and should have 
some little interest here, treated me in anything but a gen- 
tlemanly manner, and would not only not allow me to copy 
the rolls, but would not even allow me to see them, or enter 
the office where they were kept ; consequently I was obliged 
to return without the rolls of the soldiers serving on our 
frontier. I was fortunate, however,*in obtaining them from 
private individuals in Lancaster. 

To Hon. J. W. Patterson, Hon. John Wilson, Gens. 
Grant, Breck, and others at the War Department, I am 
largely indebted for my success, and I would here tender 
to them my sincere thanks. 

After getting the work well under way, I returned home, 
leaving its completion with Capt. H. A. Snow, who copied 
and forwarded the rolls to me. To him, and also to Messrs. 
Whitney and Brown, I am under great obligations. 

Having laid the matter of publishing these records before 
your Excellency and the Honorable Council, I was in- 
structed to use my own discretion. This I have done, and 
in Part Second of this Report will be found the result 
of my labors in this direction. As a whole, I am happy to 
say that I have succeeded in obtaining material for con- 
cluding the military history of our State, beyond my 
expectation. 

Original letters and private papers, or copies of them, 
from officers engaged in the War of 1812-15, the Florida 



14 adjutant-general's report. 

War, the difficulties at Indian Stream, and the war with 
Mexico, have been placed at my disposal, which have en- 
abled me to " set history right" as to many incidents con- 
nected with those wars, and to place the actions of many 
of our New-Hampshire soldiers in their proper light before 
the public. I have now brought down to the commence- 
ment of the late war as complete a military history of the 
State as is possible to obtain ; which, with the histories of 
the several volunteer organizations which rendered such 
valiant service in the War of the Rebellion, makes the proud- 
est monument that could be reared to the gallant volunteers 
of our noble State. 

In collating these records, as was the case with those 
previously published, I secured the services of Col. C. E. 
Potter, of Hillsborough, a well-known antiquarian, who 
has rendered me valuable service, and is entitled to great 
credit. 

Nearly the entire matter published, which I was unable 
to obtain from official sources, has been furnished by him, 
and is the result of many years of search and patient in- 
quiry. But for him, much valuable information, and many 
important rolls and documents, would of a necessity had to 
have been omitted. His knowledge of our early history 
admirably qualifies him for the work entrusted to him, and 
he has done it faithfully and impartially. To him and to 
Hon. L. D. Stevens of Concord, Gen. John Bedel of 
Bath, Col. H. 0. Kent and Horace White, Esq., of Lan- 
caster, Col. John H. Jackson of Boston, Col. Thomas P. 
Pierce of Manchester, Col. George Bowers of Nashua, 
Edward F. Sise, Esq., of Portsmouth, and the Misses Mil- 
ler of Temple, all of whom furnished valuable material, I 
am under great obligations. The material furnished by 
them could not have been obtained from anv other source. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 15 

TESTIMONIALS. 

As I mentioned in my last Report, I was instructed by 
Gov. Smyth and the Honorable Council to issue to every 
officer and soldier, and to the heirs of all deceased officers 
and soldiers, who might apply for the same, a testimonial 
of honor; and, during the past year, have issued some nine 
thousand, necessitating a great amount of labor, occupying, 
as it has, the individual attention of one clerk for the entire 
time. 

Those ordered prior to your administration were paid for 
by the State Treasurer from the military fund, and conse- 
quently no special appropriation was asked for or made. 
Subsequently, however, the Treasurer refused to pay for 
more, and it was not until about the middle of January 
last that those last ordered were paid for, although the bills 
were approved by you some time previous. This delay in 
the payment of the engraver's bills caused no little embar- 
rassment and correspondence on the part of this office ; and 
I trust, therefore, that you will call to the attention of the 
incoming Legislature the necessity of making some ade- 
quate provision whereby the necessary expense incurred 
(about twenty-five cents each) in the distribution of these 
testimonials may be defrayed. 

No postal expense has attended the distribution of these 
testimonials. The first few thousand were sent under the 
frank of Hon. G. G. Fogg, who kindly volunteered his ser- 
vices ; and after the expiration of his franking privilege, in 
December, 1867, Gen. A. F. Stevens introduced, and with 
the aid of our other members of Congress secured the pass- 
age of a bill authorizing the Adjutant-General to frank such 
documents. The result of this move has been to save to 
the State nearly one thousand dollars during the past year ; 
and to those gentlemen who so kindly rendered me their 
aid I desire to express my sincere thanks. No act could 
have given more general satisfaction, or elicited from those 
noble patriots who abandoned the peaceful pursuits of life, 
and the pleasant associations of family and home, and gave 
their services for their country in the hour of its greatest 



16 

trial and necessity, a more hearty, spontaneous approval 
than has this. Hundreds, on the receipt of a testimonial, 
have sent to this office their acknowledgments, couched in 
the most flattering and grateful terms ; which, with the 
eagerness to obtain them, is sufficient proof of the popular- 
ity of the measure. 

A specific appropriation should be made, in order that 
those parties who have not already received them may be 
furnished with one of these testimonials. 

BATTLE-FLAGS. 

At a suggestion made in my Report for last year, the fol- 
lowing resolution was passed relative to these glorious 
mementos : — 

" Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court convened: 

" Section 1. That the Adjutant-General be instructed to 
remove the battle-flags now on exhibition in Doric Hall, 
and place them in proper and suitable cases for their pres- 
ervation ; and the expense of the same shall be paid out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, and 
the Governor may draw his warrant for the same." (Ap- 
proved July 6, 1867.) 

This resolution has been complied with, and they are 
now so arranged and protected as to prevent premature 
decay, and also add much to the appearance of the Doric 
Hall. 

Four glass cases have been provided, and the flags placed 
in them with great care, commencing with the case on 
the north side of the hall, in which are placed those of the 
First Regiment, and following in numerical order of the reg- 
iments. In the first case (north) are the flags of the First, 
Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Regiments; two guidons 
of the Fifth, one of the Second, and one of the Tenth Reg- 
iment. No. 2 case (northwest) contains the flags of the 
Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Regiments; two guidons of the 
Sixth, and two of the Seventh Regiment. Xo. 3 (south- 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 17 

west) contains the flags of the Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and 
Twelfth Regiments ; two guidons of the Tenth, and two of 
the Twelfth Regiment. In No. 4 case (south side) are 
deposited the flags of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, 
Sixteenth, and Eighteenth Regiments of Infantry; those of 
the First Cavalry, First Battery, and First Regiment of 
Heavy Artillery : two guidons of the Thirteenth, those of 
the First Cavalry, and two of the Sixth Regiment ; making 
sixty-six flags, and eighteen guidons. Many of the flags 
are in a sad condition of decay, and will scarcely bear the 
most delicate handling, and it is well that early steps were 
taken looking to their better preservation. They are now 
safe from all molestation of visitors or the inclemency of 
the weather ; and here let them rest, hallowed mementos 
of the fearful strife in which our noble State bore such an 
honorable part: and, as we gaze upon their tattered and 
blood-stained folds, may we all swear anew to sustain the 
principles embodied in their once bright and glorious colors ! 

MILITIA AND MILITIA LAWS. 

I feel assured your Excellency will be pleased to learn 
that the active military spirit manifested by our citizens, 
since the close of the late rebellion, has not in the least 
abated during the year just past ; and that our volunteer 
militia has taken no retrogade steps during your adminis- 
tration. For decades of years, we have not had such a 
reliable, efficient force within our borders as we now have, 
and which, with a little fostering care and encouragement 
on the part of the State, will so continue, and prove not 
only a safeguard, but a credit, to the State. During the 
year there have been organized five companies, which are 
located and designated as follows : — 

Lincoln Rifles ...... Milford. 

Parker Guards ...... Lisbon. 

Newfound Lake Rifles .... Bridgewater. 

First Light Battery, Section " B " . . Manchester. 

Clarke Guards ...... Manchester. 

2 



18 adjutant-general's report. 

One company, the Smyth Guards, at Pisherville, having 
failed to comply with the requirements of law, and to main- 
tain an effective organization, has been disbanded by the 
following order : — 

General Headquarters, 

State of New-Hampshire; 
Adjutant-General's Office, Concord, May 1, 1868. 

General Orders, No. 3. 

I. The ■" Smyth Guards,' 1 New-Hampshire Volunteer Militia, 
having failed to maintain an effective organization, is hereby dis- 
banded, and the members thereof released from further obliga- 
tions attending their enlistment. 

II. Capt. Charles Reiley, First Lieut. John C. Linnehan, and 
Second Lieut. William Maher, of the " Smyth Guards," are hereby 
honorably discharged the service of the State. 

By order of His Excellency. 

WALTER HARRIMAN, 

Governor and Commander-in-chief. 
NATT HEAD, Adjutant-General. 

Numerous petitions have been received, praying for author- 
ity to organize new companies, from almost every part of 
the State, which have been disapproved, or laid upon the 
table until some more convenient time, or rather until some 
company or companies should be disbanded ; it not being 
deemed expedient or necessary to augment our present 
force, which now consists of twenty-seven companies of 
Infantry, one of Cavalry, one of Heavy Artillery, and two 
sections of Light Battery, and is organized as follows : — 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



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34 adjutant-general's report. 

ENCAMPMENTS. 

The date, place, and manner of holding the annual en- 
campments as provided by law, having been decided upon 
by your Excellency, the following orders were issued : — 

General Headquarters State of New-Hampshire; 
Adjutant-General's Office, 

Concord, Aug. 26, 1867. 
General Orders, No. 8. 

I. The several volunteer militia companies of this State are 
hereby organized into two regiments, — to be designated the 
" First and Second Regiments, New-Hampshire Volunteer Mili- 
tia," respectively. 

II. The First Regiment, commanded by Col. Joab N. Patter- 
son, with headquarters at Concord, will be composed of the fol- 
lowing companies, which will be designated by letter as follows ; 
namely: — 

Company A, Bedford Light Infantry, of Bedford. 

" B, National Guards, of Manchester. 

" C, Head Guards, of Manchester. 

" D, Smyth Rifles, of Manchester. 

" E, Sheridan Guards, of Manchester. 

" F, State Capital Guards, of Concord. 

" G, Auburn Rifles, of Auburn. 

" H, Lincoln Rifles, of Milford. 

" I, Manchester War Veterans, of Manchester. 

" K, Wilton Light Infantry, of Wilton. 

" L, Hooksett Light Infantry, of Hooksett. 

" M, Nashua Light Guards, of Nashua. 
First Company Cavalry, of Manchester. 
Lafayette Artillery, of Lyndeborough. 
First Light Battery, Section " B," of Manchester. 

III. The above organization will go into camp near Manches- 
ter, on the 18th day of September ensuing, fully armed and 
equipped, prepared for an encampment of three days' duration ; 
and the commanding officers of the several companies will imme- 
diately report by letter to Col. Patterson, who will give them all 
necessary instructions. 

IV. The Second Regiment, commanded by Col. Augustus W. 
Rollins, with headquarters at Dover, will be composed of the 
following companies, which will be designated by letter as fol- 
lows; namely: — 

Company A, Strafford Guards, of Dover. 

" B, Granite State Zouaves, of Dover. 

" C, Portsmouth City Guards, of Portsmouth. 

" D, Messer Rifles, of New-London. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 35 



Company E, Bell Rifles, of Lake Tillage. 
" F, Grant Guards, of JSorthwood. 
" G, Laconia Rifles of Laconia. 



*'* K, Harriman Guards, of Lyme. 
" L, Patterson Guards, of Hanover. 
" M, Head Rifles, of Bristol. 
" — , Parker Guards, of Lisbon. 
" — , Newfound Lake Rifles, of Bridgewater. 
First Light Battery, Section " A," of Dover. 

V. This regiment will go into camp near Lake Village, on the 
8th day of October ensuing, fully armed and equipped, prepared 
for an encampment of three days' duration ; and the commanding 
officers of the several companies will immediately report by letter 
to Col. Rollins, who will give them all necessary instructions. 

VI. Cols. Patterson and Rollins are charged with the selection 
and securing of suitable grounds for these several encampments, 
paying particular regard to the convenience and accommodation 
of the troops to be assembled. 

VII. Company commanders, requiring articles to complete the 
equipment of their respective commands, will forward requisition 
for same to these headquarters without delay. 

VIII. The men will be required to furnish their own blankets 
and rations. 

It is hoped that these encampments may not only be productive 
of good to the military service of the State, but of enjoyment to 
our citizens, and that they may be characterized with strict disci- 
pline and gentlemanly conduct on the part of every officer and 
soldier. _ _ 

By order of His Excellency. jLoo6694: 

WALTER HARRIMAN, 

Governor and Commander-in-chief. 
NATT HEAD, Adjutant-General. 

In accordance with the above order, at a little past nine 
o'clock on the day designated, the several companies sta- 
tioned at Manchester formed under command of Lieut.- 
Col. Maxwell, and, escorted by the Manchester Cornet Band, 
marched to camp, and were followed by the other companies 
of the regiment as fast as they arrived. 

Company B, National Guards, Capt. Charles H. Reed 
commanding*, went into camp the day previous, for the pur- 
pose of arranging camp and pitching the tents ; so that, 



36 adjutant-general's report. 

upon the arrival of the troops, nothing remained for them 
to do hut to enter at once upon their duties, which, for the 
first day, were mostly of a preliminary character. The 
grounds selected were well adapted for an encampment, 
and the camp was designated " Camp Lincoln," in honor of 
our martyr President. As provided by law, I had, previous 
to this encampment, purchased one hundred wall-tents, 
made from the best of material, and obtained from R. M. 
Yale, Esq., of Boston, the loan of thirty A tents and two 
large marquees. 

The order of exercises on the second clay was as follows : 
Reveille at sunrise ; breakfast call at 7 o'clock, a.m. ; sur- 
geon's call at half past seven ; orderly call at eight ; guard- 
mounting at nine ; inspection half past nine ; battalion drill 
at eleven ; dinner-call at twelve, m. ; review at two o'clock, 
p.m. ; dress parade at five. 

At the hour for inspection, the regiment was formed in 
line, and, after passing in review, was inspected by myself, 
assisted by Col. T. L. Livermore, Assistant Inspector-Gen- 
eral. As a whole, the condition of the arms, clothing, and 
equipments was very good, and the appearance of the troops 
highly creditable, of which I shall speak more in detail 
under the head of " Inspector-General's Report." The 
grand review took place at the hour designated, and re- 
flected much credit on all concerned. 

The marching and wheeling of the troops was. done with 
a soldierly precision, giving unbounded satisfaction to the 
vast concourse of people assembled to witness it ; and the 
gratification of yourself can in no wise be better expressed 
than it was in your address to the officers and soldiers on 
this occasion ; namely : — 

"I congratulate you on the admirable bearing and. effi- 
ciency of the First Regiment New-Hampshire Volunteer 
Militia. In the duties of the camp, and in the labor of the 
drill, you have done your whole duty. Your conduct and 
your appearance are evidence that this encampment is 
something more than a holiday affair. Your discipline and 
enthusiasm attest the accomplishment of the purpose that 
brought you here." 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 37 

The words of cheer contained in your address elicited, 
prolonged cheers from the entire camp; and I doubt not 
that every soldier went to his tent a better soldier. Soldiers 
need encouragement, need to have their services appre- 
ciated, else they may well become disheartened, and, where 
so little inducement is held out as in this State, will soon 
relax into a state of indifference and demoralization. Im- 
mediately after review, at your request, I ordered a company 
drill, and for half an hour all present had the satisfaction 
of witnessing one of the most pleasing sights ever beheld. 
Every company entered into the work with a will, and the 
field presented such a panoramic scene as is seldom wit- 
nessed. An imposing dress parade closed the exercises of 
the day, which was witnessed by your Excellency and 
staff. During the forenoon of the third and last day, the 
men were kept continually on the move, either by company 
or battalion drill. At one o'clock, p.m., the signal for 
striking camp was given from the well-handled guns of 
Section "B," of the Light Battery, and in three minutes 
every tent was down and securely rolled and bound. Then 
came dress parade, and the regiment was marched through 
the principal streets of Manchester to the depot. The fol- 
lowing congratulatory order was issued by Col. J. N. Pat- 
terson at the close of the encampment, and shows how that 
officer looked upon the affair : — 

Headquarters First Regiment New-Hampshire Vol. Militia, 

Camp Lincoln, Sept. 20, 1867. 
General Orders, No. 6. 

The Colonel commanding desires to return to the officers and 
soldiers of this command his most hearty thanks for the prompt 
and faithful manner in which they have discharged their several 
duties during the encampment just ended. 

Assembling, as you did, from remote localities, with (in many 
instances) but little acquaintance with each other, you have main- 
tained at all times that degree of decorum seldom if ever equalled 
in an encampment like this, and in which you have done your- 
selves and the State much credit. 

With the trifling amount of drill which you have had as a regi- 
mental organization, you have acquitted yourselves with great 
credit, and sustained well the reputation of New-Hampshire sol- 



38 adjutant-general's report. 

diers which many of you did so much to make in the field during 
the late civil strife, and which, he is proud to say, was second to 
that of the soldiery of no other State. 

No weary months of drill are required to fit you for the sterner 
duties of the soldier, as was the case in '61. Let the tocsin of 
war but sound in your ears, and you are ready to respond with 
lion hearts and arms of steel. 

Since your last annual encampment, you hare made rapid strides 
in discipline and efficiency ; and he hopes that the noble spirit 
which has animated you thus far will still be apparent, and that a 
year hence, when you shall again assemble on this or some other 
field, still greater improvement may be visible. 

By order. J. N. PATTERSON, 

Colonel Commanding. 

JOHN M. HAINES, 

Adjutant. 

Altogether, this encampment was the finest military dis- 
play seen in this section of the State for many years, and 
does great credit to those who participated, and to the 
State. The orderly conduct and soldierly bearing of the 
rank and file, and the military accomplishments of the offi- 
cers, was the subject of general encomiums. 

The Second Regiment went into camp about a mile north 
of Lake Village, on the eighth day of October. The camp 
was well laid out, and, like that of the First Regiment, pre- 
sented a beautiful and picturesque appearance. It was 
christened " Camp Cole," in honor of Councillor Cole from 
that place. 

The programme of exercises carried out at this encamp- 
ment differed but little from that at Manchester ; conse- 
quently the details need not be given. At two o'clock, 
p.m., on the second day, the regiment was reviewed by 
your Excellency, accompanied by your staff, Assistant 
Inspector-General Livermore, and Adjutant Haines of the 
First Regiment, with the same pleasing result as attended 
that of the First Regiment. The attendance on this day 
w r as very large, — estimated at from eight to ten thousand 
people, of all classes, colors, and ages ; especially gray- 
haired veterans who, under the old regime, were accustomed 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 39 

to shoulder the old Queen's arms, and fight it out on the 
line of the muster-field. These were especially pleased to 
see a revival of old muster-days ; and the younger class, to 
whom musters were only known in tradition, now feel the 
profound satisfaction which flows from personal inspection 
and consequent knowledge. Here, too, unusual order was 
maintained throughout the encampment. The discipline 
of the regiment was very good, and the proficiency shown 
in drill worthy of commendation. 

INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S REPORT. 

Office Asst. Inspector-General, 
Milford, N.H., Not. 22, 1867. 

Brigadier- General Natt Head, Adjutant and Inspector 
General of Neiv- Hampshire. 

General, — I have the honor to forward herewith my 
report of the annual inspection of the First Brigade of 
New-Hampshire Volunteer Militia, made in September and 
October, 1867. 

Owing to the brief time during which I could ask the 
attention of commanding officers, I was obliged to rely upon 
reports subsequently made by them as to the number of 
men not at inspection, and for the items on page 5 ; and I 
fear that some of the statistics drawn therefrom are inac- 
curate, while it will appear that some columns are incom- 
plete ; but, as in all essential items reports on file in the 
Adjutant and Inspector General's office can supply deficien- 
cies and correct errors, I do not think that any injury 
can result from these errors and omissions, small as they 
must be. 

I took pains to ascertain the number of " substitutes " in 
the First Regiment, and, as appears by column 57, there 
were forty-five ; and I presume that the Second Regiment 
was not free from this evil. It is unnecessary for me to 
enlarge upon the dangers of the practice of suffering men 
to appear at muster by proxy ; and I will only say that, in 



40 

my opinion, it is decidedly to the detriment of the service. 
It is just to say that, while Company " F " of the Second 
Regiment appeared with dirty arms, yet in it there was one, 
if not more, of the neatest and most soldierly men in the 
regiment ; and that Companies " M," " H," and " G," First 
Regiment, and Companies " G," " H," and " E," Second 
Regiment, deserve especial mention for cleanliness and sol- 
dierly appearance. 

The Artillery also claims mention for proficiency in drill. 

The proximity of the camps to a city and town was the 
source of much evil. The men broke the guard, and offi- 
cers passed right out of camp, — practices which cannot 
exist in company with discipline. 

The large number of men absent without authority illus- 
trates well the remark of an officer of the line, that fines 
for non-attendance are poor means of coercion, when the 
delinquents may escape by taking the " poor debtor's oath." 

The fault of not wearing the prescribed uniform pre- 
vailed to a certain extent among the officers ; and this 
leads me to say that our community cannot expect men 
to purchase costly uniforms, in which to appear as officers, 
upon a dollar and a half a day for four or five days in 
the year ; and further, that, however much patriotism 
may prompt men to pecuniary sacrifices, yet that soldiers 
of the first order, of whom a large portion are laboring 
men, cannot afford to assume the responsibility of arms 
and clothing, and devote time and money to the service of 
the State, on such trivial pay. 

I am constrained by a sense of duty to again say that 
proper regimental organizations, brigade encampments, 
boards of examination for officers, and competitive trials 
among the troops, are absolutely necessary for a prosperous 
militia in our State ; and that, to accomplish the best results 
in every particular, the duration of the musters should be 
increased to a week at least. 
Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOS. L. LIYERMORE, 

Colonel and Assistant Inspect or- General X. H. Y. 31. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 41 

The report proper of this inspection is so lengthy and diffi- 
cult to insert in a report like this, that I deem it inadvi- 
sable to attempt the publication of anything more than a 
general summary of it : — 

Number of regiments, 2; number of companies, 30. 1 
general staff-officer, 101 field, staff, and company officers, 
and 1,247 enlisted men were present for duty, and 18 men 
present sick; making a total of 1,367 present at the encamp- 
ment. 21 enlisted men were absent with leave, and 58 
without leave, 1 officer and 7 enlisted men absent sick, and 
one officer absent without leave ; making an aggregate of 
1,455. 102 officers and 1,245 enlisted men were reported 
as effective for the field. 93 of these officers and 570 of 
the men have seen service in the field. They have done 
their duty nobly once, and, should an emergency arise, may 
be relied upon as doing it again. 

The arms of three companies, C, B, and F, of the First 
Regiment, and those of three companies, C, D, and F, of 
the Second Regiment, are reported as having been, in a 
degree, dirty. 

Condition of accoutrements good, of horse-equipments 
good, and condition of clothing good ; the military bear- 
ing and discipline, not as good as it should be, but under 
the circumstances, perhaps, as good as could be expected. 

The poor condition of the arms of Company B, First 
Regiment, was quite excusable, inasmuch as the company 
was on police and fatigue duty for three days previous to 
inspection. So also with Company C, of the Second Regi- 
ment. Through the negligence of its former commander, 
Capt. Mitchell, the arms became much scattered, and in an 
almost unserviceable condition ; but Capt. Hodgdon, the 
present commander, took hold of the matter in earnest, 
just before encampment, and is entitled to much credit. 
No excuse is given for the other companies whose arms are 
noted as dirty. The instruction in guard-duty had not that 
uniformity which it ought, and it is hoped that this defect 
will be remedied in the future. Owing to the shortness of 
time in camp, and the fact that many of the companies 



42 

were never before attached to a regimental organization, it 
could not be expected that the best of discipline could be 
maintained, or that the movements could be executed with 
the precision of veteran regiments ; but, in a majority of 
cases, the companies were quite proficient, and showed care- 
ful instruction in the school of the company : and in the 
battalion movements there was more precision than last 
year, which, considering the long interval of a year between 
these drills, was highly creditable. 

A three days' encampment annually does not give suffi- 
cient time in which to regulate camp, and put the command 
in condition for inspection, or even to execute battalion 
movements with any degree of precision. 

Nearly the entire first day must necessarily be devoted 
to preliminaries, so that not more than one or two battalion 
drills at the most can be had, before the troops are called 
upon for inspection and review. In view of this fact, I 
feel constrained to again urge upon your Excellency the 
importance of an annual encampment of five days' duration, 
and that it be by brigade rather than by regiment ; thus 
allowing one day for assembling, establishing camp, and 
attending to the minor details, and another day for breaking 
camp and dispersing homeward. 

The three days intervening could be devoted exclusively 
to drill, camp and guard duty, which would result in a 
marked improvement in the proficiency and effectiveness of 
our militia ; fully compensating for the extra expense which 
might be incurred, if indeed there were any, which I very 
much doubt. 

The encampment should be held at the most central and 
accessible point ; and, as the law now stands, I believe 
arrangements can be made for transportation, so that 
enough can be saved to pay the expense of the two addi- 
tional days in camp. 

I hope, before the time for another encampment arrives, 
the militia of this State may be thoroughly reorganized, 
and that it consist of three regiments and one brigade. 
Let there be ten companies of infantry, one of cavalry, and 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 43 

one section of light battery to each regiment. Then let 
there be frequent drills, military displays, and an annual 
encampment by brigade of five days' duration. This would 
bring the men together in large masses, and they would 
become habituated to the varied duties of the camp and 
field, and very soon become familiar with the profession of 
arms, and be in readiness at all times for any emergency 
which might arise. If so organized and schooled (and I 
see no reason why it cannot be), we shall very soon have a 
military force which would do credit to any State or people ; 
and, as relates to this, no further legislation is needed. It 
lays wholly with the Commander-in-chief. 

No one thing is conducive of so much good to the mili- 
tary service, and consequently to the State, as military dis- 
plays on holidays, and other occasions requiring a military 
escort, whether it be on Inauguration Day, the reception of 
distinguished personages, or any other public day. On all 
such occasions the entire force is ever ready to respond 
favorably to any call made, as is plainly evidenced by the 
enthusiasm manifested on the occasion of your inaugural in 
June last, and that of the reception of Maj.-Gen. Sheridan 
on the 29th of October, 1867. In both instances every 
company invited were present, and not only did great credit 
to themselves, but their presence was a source of gratifica- 
tion to our citizens. When it was decided by the city of 
Concord to give to Gen. Sheridan a formal reception, the 
Committee of Arrangements extended, to such companies 
as transportation could be furnished for, an invitation to be 
present, which was unanimously accepted. One company 
furnished its own transportation, and came in teams a dis- 
tance of more than twenty miles. Other companies came 
by rail, after receiving information that transportation could 
not be furnished, and paid their fare. It was a rainy, dis- 
agreeable day ; yet the display made was never equalled in 
this State. Unfortunately, the hero of the Shenandoah was 
detained, and the major portion of the troops were obliged 
to return without seeing him ; but, notwithstanding their 
disappointment, they insisted upon carrying out the pro- 



44 adjutant-general's report. 

gramme laid down by the committee, and marched through 
mud and rain through the principal streets of the city. 
The action of the militia on this occasion was so praise- 
worthy that the following congratulatory circular was issued 
from these headquarters : - — 

General Headquarters State of New-Hampshire. 

Adjutant-General's Office, Concord, Oct. 30, 1867. 
Circular No. 1. 

The undersigned feels that he would do injustice to the military 
organizations of this State, did he fail to make some formal 
expression of his admiration for the alacrity with which they 
responded to the invitation to participate in the reception of 
Major-General Sheridan ; for the magnanimity with which they 
bore the disappointment of losing an interview with that gallant 
soldier; and the willing hearts and martial step with which they 
marched on parade. 

He regrets his inability to procure transportation for the several 
organizations not present, and assures them that no effort on his 
part was spared in that direction. For their manifest eagerness 
to be present they have his sincere thanks. 

He desires to convey to those organizations present, his pro- 
found thanks for their services on that day, and the assurance that 
such conduct as theirs, although on a peaceful occasion,, evinces, 
in his estimation and that of many observers, that fortitude and 
discipline which constitute a good soldier. 

NATT HEAD, 

Adjutant- General. 

Such military displays promote discipline and efficiency, 
afford our citizens an opportunity of real enjoyment, and of 
acquainting themselves with the workings and worth of our 
militia, and should therefore be encouraged in every possi- 
ble way. 

REPORTS OF INSPECTION OF ARMORIES. 

Much good having accrued from the inspection made 
last year, I deemed it advisable to again inspect the several 
armories, and consequently issued the following special 
order : — 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 45 

General Headquarters State of New Hampsiiice. 
Adjutant-General's Office, 

Concord, April 6, 1868. 
Special Order No. 7. 

Colonel Thomas L. Livermore, Assistant Inspector-General, is 
hereby directed to proceed at once to inspect the armories, arms, 
equipments, and uniforms of the several military companies in 
this State, excepting the State Capital Guards, Grant Guards, 
Hooksett Light Infantry, and the Lancaster Rifles, and to render 
a full report of the same to these headquarters. He will not only 
report the condition of the armories and property, but also that of 
the company records, the apparent discipline, and the ability and 
qualifications of the several commanding officers, and will recom- 
mend such action as may be deemed necessary for the good of the 
public service. 

By order of His Excellency. 

WALTER HARRIMAN, 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 
NATT HEAD, 
Adjutant, Inspector, and Quartermaster General. 

Col. Livermore at once entered upon the discharge of his 
duties, and submitted the following report : — 

Office of Assistant Inspector-General, 
First Brigade, First Division, N. H. V. M., 
Milford, April 27, 1868. 

Brigadier- General Natt Head, Adjutant and Inspector- 
General. 
General, — I have the honor to report that, in compli- 
ance with S. 0. No 7, A. G. 0., State of New-Hampshire, 
dated April 6, 1868, I have inspected the armories, arms, 
etc., of the companies hereinafter mentioned, and that their 
condition was found to be as noted. 



first regiment. 

Company B, National Guards, Manchester, had a new 
and excellent armory, suitable for drill by company, with 
rooms for clothing and arms. The armory is not yet com- 
pletely fitted up, and the uniforms and accoutrements were 
packed in boxes. The captain reported that there were 



46 adjutant-general's report. 

fifty sets of accoutrements and fifty uniforms in the armory. 
There were forty-four rifles in the armory, rusty and in 
bad condition. 

Company C, Head Guards, Manchester, had forty-seven 
rifles in the armory, rusty and in poor condition, and forty- 
six sets of accoutrements and some spare belts ; forty uni- 
forms, less four caps and one pair of trowsers, in the armory, 
all in fair condition. The captain reported that he had not 
succeeded in getting his men together for a long time, that 
they manifested no interest in their company, and that he 
advised disbanding. I am not prepared to say where the 
fault lies, but would recommend an investigation among 
the members of the company, and, if the captain's report 
is correct and a remedy is not found, that the company be 
disbanded. 

Company D, Smyth Rifles, Manchester, had in the armory 
fifty rifles, numbered, a part of which were rusty ; fifty sets 
of accoutrements, numbered, in good condition; and forty- 
eight uniforms, numbered, dirty. 

Company E, Sheridan Guards, Manchester, had in the 
armory fifty rifles, in excellent condition ; fifty sets of accou- 
trements, numbered, in good condition ; and forty-six uni- 
forms, some of which were dirty. 

Company H, Lincoln Rifles, Milford, had a new armory, 
suitable for squad drill, with a good room for clothing and 
arms, and had in the armory forty-seven rifles, in excellent 
condition, except three which were rusty, not numbered ; 
forty-eight sets of accoutrements in good condition ; and 
forty-one uniforms, a few of which were dirty, all of which 
were neatly hung up, but not numbered. 
' Company I, Manchester War Veterans, had in the armory 
forty-seven uniforms packed in a box, as the captain re- 
ported ; forty-six rifles, numbered, in good condition, except 
a few which were rusty ; and forty-seven s sets of accoutre- 
ments, less one belt and bayonet scabbard, in good condition. 

Company K, Wilton Light Infantry, Wilton, had in the 
armory fifty rifles, numbered, ten of which were rusty; and 
forty-eight sets of accoutrements, numbered, in good condi- 
tion ; and no uniforms. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 47 

Company M, Nashua Light Guards, had in the armory 
forty-nine rifles, rusty and in bad condition, and fifty sets of 
accoutrements and thirty-three uniforms, in good condition. 

First Company of Cavalry had a new armory, large enough 
for company drill dismounted, with well arranged rooms 
for clothing and equipments ; and had in the armory forty- 
eight sabres, numbered, in good condition, except a few 
needing cleaning, in neat racks ; forty-eight belts, forty- 
eight uniforms, and fifty sets of horse-equipments, all in 
good condition and neatly hung up. 

Lafayette Artillery, Lyndeborough, had in the armory 
fifty-nine muskets, in fair condition, except four which were 
rusty ; fifty-eight sets of accoutrements ; on the floor one 
field-piece in poor condition, and parts of twelve uniforms 
in good condition. 

First Light Battery, Section B, Manchester, had an ar- 
mory not suitable ; and, from the report of the officers, it 
seems impossible for them to obtain one except through an 
appropriation with which a new one can be built, or the one 
now occupied altered and repaired. There were in the 
armory two guns and caissons, harnesses and equipments 
complete, with the exception of a few minor articles ; and 
thirty-nine uniforms neatly packed in boxes, all in good 
condition. 

SECOND REGIMENT. 

Company A, Strafford Guards, had in the armory fifty 
rifles, in good condition, with a few exceptions; fifty sets of 
accoutrements and fifty uniforms, all in good condition. 

Company B, Granite State Zouaves, had in the armory 
forty-eight rifles, rusty and in bad condition ; forty-eight 
sets of accoutrements in good condition, and eight uniforms 
in fair order. This company was reported as being in 
loose order, and there evidently is an evil in it. 

Company C, Portsmouth City Guards, had forty-five rifles 
in armory, rusty and in bad condition ; thirty-seven sets of 
accoutrements, in good condition ; and fifty uniforms, re- 
ported by the captain to be packed in boxes. The armory 



48 adjutant-general's report. 

of this company is a poor one, but the captain said that 
negotiations were pending for a bettter one. 

Company E, Bell Rifles, Lake Village, had anew and fine 
armory, suitable for squad drill, in which were fifty rifles, in 
racks, and fifty sets of accoutrements hung up, in excellent 
condition ; and twenty-three uniforms in boxes, in fair 
condition. 

Company G, Laconia Rifles, Laconia, had in the armory, 
as the captain reported, forty-seven rifles and forty-seven 
sets of accoutrements, packed in boxes. Uniforms out, 
because the moths had got into them. 

Company H, Rockingham Guards, Newmarket, had in 
the armory fifty rifles, some in good condition and some 
rusty ; fifty sets of accoutrements in good condition ; and 
fifty uniforms, as the captain reported, packed in a box. 

Company K, Harriman Guards, Lyme, had in the armory 
forty-nine rifles, forty-nine sets of accoutrements, and 
twenty-three uniforms, all in good condition. 

Company L, Patterson Guards, Hanover, had in the 
armory thirty-nine rifles, some in good condition and some 
rusty ; and thirty-nine sets of accoutrements and thirty-nine 
uniforms, all in good condition. It was reported that dis- 
affection prevailed among some of the men, and that the 
organization was spiritless on that account. As was sug- 
gested to me, I am of the opinion that, if a new captain 
were appointed, the disaffected men discharged, and the 
armory placed in more commodious quarters at " Hanover 
Plain," the vacancies could be easily filled, and the company 
inspirited. 

Company M, Head Rifles, Bristol, had a new and fine 
armory, suitable for drill purposes, and had in the armory 
thirty -three rifles, numbered ; fifty sets of accoutrements, 
numbered ; and thirty-four uniforms, all in good condition. 

Parker Guards, Lisbon, had a good armory, suitable for 
squad drill, and had in the armory fifty rifles, in good con- 
dition, except a few which were rusty; and forty-seven uni- 
forms and fifty sets of accoutrements, in good condition. 

Newfound Lake Rifles, Bridgewater, used a small room 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 49 

for an armory, not fitted up, and had in the armory thirty- 
eight rifles, thirty-eight sets of accoutrements, and thirty- 
eight uniforms, all in good condition. 

First Light Battery, Section A, had in the armory two 
guns, caissons, harnesses, and equipments complete, in fair 
condition. They want, however, tompions and gun-covers. 
There were in the armory forty-four sabres and belts, and 
twenty-four uniforms, partly numbered, all in good condi- 
tion. The harnesses are neatly hung up in the gun-house. 

UNATTACHED. 

Clark Guards, Manchester, had a good armory, suitable 
for squad drill, and had in the armory fifty rifles, numbered, 
in racks ; fifty sets of accoutrements, not numbered ; and 
forty-nine uniforms, not numbered, all hung up and in good 
condition. 

The books, as far as I was able to inspect, were in good 
order, apparently, though not generally filled up to date of 
inspection. 

Where the armories have not been changed, and the prop- 
erty has remained unnumbered since my report of last 
June, I have not so specified. 

From reports of the captains, I learned that moths had 
injured the clothing extensively ; and I would recommend 
that a method of storing it be ordered which would prevent 
such injury. 

It is my opinion, in view of the many rusty arms and 
dirty uniforms above reported, that the armorers generally 
have not, at regular and frequent intervals, examined and 
cleaned the property in their charge, and that the men have 
not been required generally to clean their uniforms as soon 
as practicable after using them. 

These evils, and the decline of interest exhibited in some 
instances, may be attributed to two causes,— lack of time 
spent by good officers in supervising their companies, and 
the incompetency of poor officers, and the want of a suffi- 
cient inducement to the men to become thorough soldiers. 

The remedies which present themselves to my mind are, 
4 



50 adjutant-general's report. 

sufficient pay to officers and non-commissioned officers to 
induce them to devote the requisite time and attention to 
their duties ; and a board of examination, before which 
every officer should come, which should ascertain whether 
he was fit for his position, and worthy of receiving the pay 
offered ; and to require of officers and soldiers in camp and 
armory to conform strictly to army discipline, having offered 
them the inducements which I have urged in other reports. 

Good officers are resigning because they cannot afford 
to be officers, and good soldiers are becoming wearied be- 
cause discipline is not enforced ; and I think I can safely 
say that all good officers and soldiers in the militia support 
me in the declaration that, if the State will offer induce- 
ments worthy of the service, they will put out this spirit of 
a " holiday soldiery," and become soldiers worthy of their 
hire. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS L. LIVERMORE, 

Col. and A. 1. #., N. H. V. M. 

Col. Kent inspected the armory of the Lancaster Rifles, 
and made the following report : — 

Lancaster, New-Hampshire, 
April 23, 1868. 

General, — Acting under your commission, bearing date 
April 15, I have this day inspected the armory of the Lan- 
caster Rifles, Capt. Jared I. Williams, and find there — 

50 muskets, complete, in good order, in racks, and num- 
bered ; 50 sets equipments, minus one set reported stolen 
(the same report being made in 1867), said equipments 
being hung on pegs ; 48 uniforms, well kept, and hung on 
pegs ; 1 tenor drum ; 1 fife, — the above articles being the 
property of the State. The articles here enumerated are 
in good condition. 

The present armory is dry, but not of sufficient size for 
a drill-room. The lease of the premises expires June 1, 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 51 

and Captain Williams is negotiating for quarters which, if 
procured, will afford the advantages of a light, dry armory 
and drill-room combined. 

I deem it proper to remark, as connected with the in- 
terests of the volunteer militia in this region, that a regi- 
mental organization in this Congressional District would 
much enhance its efficiency. There are already five com- 
panies within the district limits, and it is believed that two 
additional companies could easily be organized in Coos, pre- 
liminary steps to that end having already been taken. As 
I understand the present law and the voluntary enlistments 
under it, I believe there is sufficient margin for two or three 
more companies. As yet, there are no troops in Cheshire 
or Sullivan Counties ; and I respectfully suggest that such 
measures as may be deemed judicious be taken to encour- 
age the formation of companies in the counties referred 
to, with a view to the organization of the Third Regiment 
New-Hampshire Volunteer Militia prior to the annual fall 
encampments. I am very confident that any official indi- 
cations of a desire in this direction would meet with suc- 
cess, and that the action would stimulate the military spirit 
more than any other policy. 
I am, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY 0. KENT, 
Colonel and Acting Inspector. 

Brigadier-General Natt Head, Adjutant, Inspector, and Quar- 
termaster General, Concord, N.II. 

The Grant Guards, Northwood, and Messer Rifles, New- 
London, were inspected by Adjutant Haines, of the First 
Regiment, who rendered the following report : — - 



52 adjutant-general's report. 

Headquarters First Regt. N. H. Volunteer Militia, 
Concord, April 24, 1868. 

Brigadier- General Natt Head, Adjutant, Inspector, and 
Quartermaster General, Concord, N.H. 

General, — In obedience to your instructions of the 22d 
inst., I proceeded to Northwood and made the required 
inspection, with the following results ; viz. : — 

In the armory I found — 

41 Springfield rifle muskets, in racks, and numbered. 

43 cartridge-boxes and belts, on pegs, numbered. 

36 bayonet scabbards, on pegs, numbered. 

36 waist-belts and cap-pouches, numbered. 

1 sergeant's sword, on peg. 

1 musician sword, on peg. 

1 drum. 

1 pair drum-sticks. 
35 pairs scales, in box. 
17 frock-coats, not numbered. 
16 pairs trousers, not numbered. 
16 caps, not numbered. 

The armory is a very good one, — dry, light, and well 
adapted for a drill-room, though rather small. It is the 
largest, however, that can be obtained. 

The arms and equipments are in a very good condition, 
with the exception of one or two guns, which are somewhat 
rusty and need care. 

The uniforms are soiled considerably in some cases, 
though perhaps in as good condition as could be expected 
after two years of service. 

Capt. Hoitt, failing to receive your notice of this inspec- 
tion, was not present ; but I was politely treated by Lieut. 
Bean, and by him shown every facility to assist me in the 
performance of my duty. I called on Capt. Hoitt, who 
lives some two miles from the armory, and was informed 
by him that a part of the missing property was in the hands 
of members of the company, and the residue he had loaned 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 53 

to be used at an exhibition to be given by the Seminary. 
He also informed me that he proposed to turn the prop- 
erty over to Lieut. Bean, on Saturday next, agreeably to 
your order. 

The company is now much broken up and demoralized, 
mainly for the want of a proper and efficient commander ; 
but I am of the opinion that, when Capt. Hoitt shall have 
been discharged, and a -new board of officers appointed and' 
qualified, new life will be infused into its ranks, new and 
good men will unite themselves with it, and it will again be 
a good company. 

I have the honor to be, General, 

Yery respectfully, your ob't servant, 

JOHN M. HAINES, 
Adjt. First Eegt. K H. V. M. 



Headquarters First Eegt. N. H. Volunteer Militia, 

Concord, May 6, 1868. 

Brigadier- General Natt Head, Adjutant and Inspector 
General State of New- Hampshire, Concord, N.H. 

General, — In compliance with instructions from your 
headquarters, I have inspected the arms, armory, <fcc, of 
the Messer Rifles, and have the honor to make the follow- 
ing report : — 

The company have an excellent armory, in which I found 
the following property ; viz. : — 

49 rifles, in racks, numbered, and in very good condition. 

49 sets of equipments, on pegs, numbered, condition good. 

47 uniforms, in clothes-room, on pegs, numbered, and in 
good condition. 

1 drum, 1 fife, 1 sergeant's sword, and 2 musician's 
swords were also in the armory in good condition. 

This company is under a high state of discipline, and is 
in every way efficient, and a credit to itself and the State. 
Yery respectfully, your ob't servant, 

JOHN M. HAINES, 
Adjt. First Regt. N. E. M. V. 



54 adjutant-general's report. 

Company L, Hooksett Light Infantry, Hooksett, has the 
use of the Town Hall for drill purposes, and also have a 
room fitted up expressly for arms, accoutrements, and 
clothing. 

With the exception of one rifle, the entire property is in 
the armory, in racks, numbered, and in good condition. 

The armory of the State Capital Guards, Concord, has 
not been inspected, from the fact that the one formerly 
occupied had been given up just prior to this inspection, 
and the property temporarily stored in a room in Stickney's 
Block. This company is not composed of the best mate- 
rial, and is badly officered ; but these evils will soon be 
remedied. 

The Auburn Rifles, Auburn, were also obliged to vacate 
their armory, so that no inspection could be made ; but the 
property is safely stored, and in good condition. This com- 
pany proposes to erect an appropriate building for armory 
and drill purposes, as a private enterprise, and is entitled 
to credit for the patriotic zeal and interest manifested in 
this, and all other matters pertaining to good order and 
military discipline. 

The Bedford Light Infantry, Bedford, is in good condi- 
tion, and the arms, accoutrements, and clothing well kept. 

In some few cases, the facts elicited by this inspection 
are not as satisfactory as was the case last year ; but, as a 
whole, the condition of the public property in the possession 
of the several companies is, in a high degree, satisfactory. 
The benefits of these inspections are threefold. The officers, 
anticipating such an inspection, take pride in having the 
property in the best possible condition. The State ascer- 
tains from personal knowledge the true state of such prop- 
erty ; and also becomes cognizant of many facts concerning 
the discipline and standing of companies, which otherwise 
would be unknown, and cause no little embarrassment, 
misunderstanding, and correspondence. 

MAY INSPECTION. 

Although the Revised Statutes provide that this inspection 
shall be made two weeks earlier than formerly, yet I have 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 55 

not been able to obtain returns from all of the companies, 
and consequently am obliged to omit an abstract of the 
same, which, were it possible, would be desirable to be given 
in this Report. 

It now occurs on the second Tuesday, but should, as I 
recommended in my last report, be held on the first Tues- 
day ; thus affording ample time in which to obtain returns 
make up the abstract, and submit the report of this office 
in season for the same to be laid before the Legislature in 
the early part of the session. I would therefore recom- 
mend that the first be substituted for the second Tuesday. 

With one exception only, the various companies paraded 
on the 12th of May, in accordance with the provisions of 
law, and, so far as known, acquitted themselves with credit. 
The State Capital Guards, of this city, failed to come out, 
and for neglect of duty the commander will be summarily 
dealt with. Several companies made extensive arrange- 
ments for the occasion, and not only complied with the 
requirements of law, but indulged in exercises, such as tar- 
get-shooting, dress parade, &c, much to the benefit of the 
service and the enjoyment of our citizens. This was 
especially true of the three companies at Dover (the Straf- 
ford Guards, Granite State Zouaves, and Section A, First 
Light Battery), and of the Parker Guards at Lisbon. The 
former companies made such an extensive display as to 
render the occasion really a gala day in Dover. The Port- 
land and the Dover Cornet Bands were employed, at the 
expense of the companies ; and everything that could be 
done, regardless of expense, was done to add to the interest 
of the occasion and to please the public : and the eitizens 
of Dover have every reason to be proud of these efficient 
companies, and of the good order everywhere manifested 
on the occasion. 

The Parker Guards assembled at nine o'clock, a.m., 
and continued to drill until five o'clock, p.m. They also 
had the services of a band, and, before breaking ranks, voted 
unanimously to turn out five full days in the year, in addi- 
tion to the drills required by law ; which shows how much 



56 adjutant-general's report. 

interest the men take in the service, and that it is not for 
the pay they receive, as pay for only two days' drill annually 
is allowed, and that will no more than pay their expenses, 
saying nothing about the time which they lose. 

A radical change in tactics has been effected by the adop- 
tion of Upton's new system, which I believe will result in 
much good to the military service. 

The following orders were received and issued relative to 
this matter : — 

Headquarters of the Army, 

Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, Aug. 1, 18C7. 
General Orders, No. 73. 

The following order received from the War Department is pub- 
lished for the information and guidance of the army : — 

War Department, 
Washington City, Aug. 1, 1867. 

ORDER IN RELATION TO UPTON'S INFANTRY TACTICS. 

The new system of Infantry Tactics prepared by Brevet Major- 
General Emory Upton, United States Army, recommended for 
adoption in the place of all others by a Board of officers of which 
General Grant is President, having been approved, is adopted for 
the instruction of the Infantry of the Army of the United States, 
and for the observance of the Militia of the United States. 

To insure uniformity throughout the army, all Infantry exer- 
cises and manoeuvres not embraced in that system are prohibited, 
and those therein prescribed will be strictly observed. 

By command of General Grant. 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War. 
E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutant- General. 



General Headquarters State of New-Hampshire, 
Adjutant-General's Office, 

Concord, Nov. 26, 1867. 
General Orders, No. 9. 

In pursuance with General Orders No. 73, Headquarters of the 
Army, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D.C., dated Aug. 1, 
1867, the following is published for the information and guid- 
ance of the Militia of the State of New-Hampshire : — 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 57 

I. The new system of Infantry Tactics prepared by Brevet 
Major-General Emory Upton, U. S. Army, recommended for adop- 
tion in the place of all others by a Board of officers of which Gen. 
Grant is President, having been approved and adopted for the 
instruction of the Infantry of the Army and the observance of the 
Militia of the United States, the same is hereby adopted by this 
State ; and all military exercises and manoeuvres not embraced in 
that system are prohibited, and those therein prescribed will be 
strictly observed, that uniformity throughout the State may be 
insured. 

II. Copies of Casey's Infantry Tactics now in the possession of 
company and regimental officers will be immediately returned to 
this office. 

By order of His Excellency, 

WALTER HARRIMAN, 

Governor and Commander-in-chief. 
NATT HEAD, 

Adjutant- General. 

Copies of this new work have been obtained, and issued 
to those officers entitled to receive them, and their receipt 
taken for the same. 

In the foregoing pages I have stated in brief the present 
condition of the militia of this State, and also given a 
sketch of its doings since my last report. 

That the militia is essentially a State institution and 
must be maintained, requires but little argument. The 
Constitution of the United States recognizes the fact. The 
Articles of Confederation declare that " every State shall 
always keep up a well-regulated and disciplined militia"; 
and our own Constitution wisely declares that " a well- 
regulated militia is the proper, natural, and sure defence of 
the State." The necessity of having an organized military 
force within each State has ever been advocated by the 
greatest and best statesmen of our land ; and at no time in 
our existence has this necessity been greater or more 
obvious than at the present, or than it has been for the last 
ten years, during which time we have had, until recently, 
but little more than an organization upon paper. 

To this neglect of duty, on the part of the Northern 
States, may well be attributed the prolongation of the Great 
Rebellion and the consequent evils. 



58 adjutant-general's report. 

The efficient Adjutant-General of New York thus speaks 
of this matter : — 

" How many of these lives might have been saved, had 
there existed a more perfect organization at the outset, can- 
not be determined ; but all confess that tens of thousands 
of lives, and millions on millions of treasure, were uselessly 
lost, because our citizens had forgotten that in a great and 
noble sense they were also soldiers, and, thus forgetful, had 
despised warning, and derided the efforts of those who had 
attempted to secure even a scanty organization, and en- 
courage a military zeal. 

" This prolongation of the war, with all its vast and incal- 
culable sacrifices and losses, was one lesson, apparently too 
sad, too mournful, too heavily burdened with remorse, to 
be readily forgotten ; and, if forgotten, then experience is 
indeed worthless, and history repeats itself in errors only 
because a stolid world refuses to learn from the past. 

" A Mohammedan fatalism would be more commendable 
than such disregard of a costly lesson by a nation that 
claims to be progressive in all the avenues that tend towards 
perfection, and should, above all others, appreciate and 
cherish the lives of its citizens." 

By none is the expense and burden of the militia so 
severely felt as by those composing it; and to such, those 
who are exempt, or who do not perform such duty, owe 
an obligation which ought never to be ignored. 

He who unites himself with a military company does so 
with the knowledge that the contract not only requires a 
large expenditure of time and money, but possibly places 
life and limb in jeopardy ; and the sacrifices thus cheerfully 
made should be appreciated by those citizens who escape 
them. 

Certain it is that they should bear the expense as cheer- 
fully as does the soldier, and not, while enjoying the security 
of life and property afforded by him, demand his services 
as a gratuity. 

The militia is the only safe insurance ; and yet, while men 
pay with pleasure the premium required to insure life and 
property in stock companies, they grumble at the expense 
of this their only safeguard. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 59 

In suggesting these few facts upon the economy, neces- 
sity, and effectiveness of a judicious militia system, I might 
make reference to the policy of other governments in regard 
to this important arm of national defence, but I deem it 
unnecessary. Under one name or another, all the Conti- 
nental nations have their militia ; and the point revealed by 
reviewing their systems is, that they make a soldier of every 
citizen, keeping perpetually in view the right the State has 
to his services. 

If the powers referred to, sustaining large standing 
armies for the ordinary purposes of government and police, 
have their citizens so thoroughly enrolled for duty in case 
of emergency, the lesson applicable to our State and nation 
seems irresistible. Here, government depends upon the 
people for stability and power ; and hence the militia, which 
in monarchial States is secondary to the standing army, 
becomes with us of the first importance, as affording the 
support on which in time of peril the State must rely. 

In fact, it is because ours is a government of the people, 
and for the people, that a judicious militia establishment 
should be encouraged. I apprehend it useless to attempt 
the demonstration of a fact so patent as that the existence 
of a well-organized militia prior to the war would have 
saved millions of treasure, thousands of lives, and, in all 
probability, would have rendered the struggle less pro- 
longed. The Southern States had their military organiza- 
tions, that sprang to arms at the first signal. The North 
had comparatively few troops that could be put in the field 
at a brief notice, and hence the advantage gained at first by 
the Confederate forces. The services rendered by the Sixth 
and Eighth Massachusetts Regiments in April, 1861, saved 
the nation its capital city, and proved beyond cavil the in- 
valuable advantage of a well-organized militia. 

It is not sound logic to say that, the war being over, there 
is no call for an active militia. If a militia was needed in 
1861, there is no proof that the contingency demanding its 
services may not again arise. " In time of peace, prepare 
for war," is sound doctrine ; and we are forced to admit by 



60 adjutant-general's report. 

costly experience that unceasing vigilance alone secures 
national safety. 

The matter of expense naturally obtrudes itself in con- 
sidering this subject. It is proper that it should ; for, as any 
system in a republic is that of the people, they should be 
conversant with all its details. No necessary expense is 
extravagant. Precaution, shaped in the form of a few 
thousand dollars expended for the military of the State in 
1861, would have saved hundreds of thousands of dollars 
expended annually for five succeeding years ; and a proper 
expense in the present era of peace may be the means of 
preserving that peace, or of restoring it if assailed. 

Primarily every citizen owes allegiance to the State that 
protects him, and his exposure in the field is a part of that 
duty. It is not generally necessary that so extensive meas- 
ures be resorted to as that all the military of the State be 
arrayed at once ; and hence a system that comprehends all 
able-bodied men, while it puts on an actual military footing 
only so many as is consistent with economy, and so many 
as shall form a nucleus in time of need, around which the 
enrolled militia can rally, seems to meet the demands of 
the times, and satisfy the teachings of experience. Such a 
system is that in successful operation at the present time in 
New-Hampshire. 

Several considerations of weight, in connection with our 
annual encampments, present themselves for consideration. 
First, the active militia comprises but a small fraction of 
the gross enrolment, and the companies are so situated as 
to afford a military nucleus at convenient points. The 
companies are at the minimum of the regulation number, 
and could easily be increased in time of need. The expense 
is not heavy, even if estimated at the outside figures ; but, 
when we consider that no money goes out of the State, but 
that what is expended merely passes from the people 
through the treasury to the people again, affording them 
both recreation and valuable information, while it perpetu- 
ates a system that at any time may be of the utmost impor- 
tance and save heavy expenditures, it must be admitted 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 61 

that the burden bears very easily, if indeed it is felt. Thus 
far, the present system has worked effectively and with 
comparatively small expense. 

I would also make a few suggestions and recommenda- 
tions, for your consideration, as to the government and 
maintenance of the militia. 

As I have mentioned, no class of our citizens feel the 
burden of the militia as do those who compose it ; and I 
would therefore recommend that an act be passed requiring 
every one subject to military duty under the laws of the 
State, who is not a member of some volunteer company, to 
pay an annual tax of one dollar, the fund so raised to be 
used for the support of the active militia. This military 
tax should be placed upon the same footing with other 
taxes, to be collected by the collectors of the several towns, 
cities, and wards, in the same manner, and at the same time, 
that other taxes are collected, and by them paid into the 
State treasury, as a commutation fund, from which the 
expense of the militia should be paid. 

Numerous States, and those too which are usually fore- 
most in the tramp of progression, have adopted this 
measure, given it a fair trial, and are well pleased with its 
workings and benefits. 

The amount which might in this way be collected would 
be all-sufficient to defray the entire expense of the militia ; 
and the burden would fall more equally and lightly upon 
all, as the militiaman, performing the duty at a rate of pay 
altogether inadequate to defray his expenses, would thus 
be relieved of a part of the expense, inasmuch as, under 
this arrangement, the amount received is not in part made 
up from his own purse. 

I really can see no objection to such a law, and believe it 
would be productive of much good. No citizen who has at 
heart the best interest of the State, or values the protection 
of life and property, can object to paying the small sum of 
one dollar annually for the support of a military force 
which at all times would be ready and willing to expel 
foreign foes, or suppress domestic insurrection. 



62 adjutant-general's report. 

As says Gen. McCreary, of Pennsylvania : " If it be 
praiseworthy to expend money to educate the children of 
the State in a knowledge of the principles and blessings of 
a free government, it must be equally so to contribute to 
the support of the military arm of the country, without 
which no government ever did, or ever can, long endure." 

I hope an act providing for this may be passed at the 
present session of the Legislature. I would also recom- 
mend that three dollars, at least, be allowed for horse-hire. 
As the law now stands, those officers obliged to furnish 
horses, and the cavalry, only receive one dollar and a half 
for the same, which will but little more than pay for the 
horse's keeping. Saddle-horses cost all the way from three 
to six dollars a day ; and for an officer or cavalryman to 
have to perform military duty, at one dollar and a half a 
day, seems to be rather a serious burden. 

The law provides ample pay for artillery horses, and I 
believe it to be an oversight only that the cavalry was not 
included. Justice to the soldier and credit to the State 
demand further legislation on this subject, and I hope that 
before the present Legislature adjourns there will be substi- 
tuted for sections thirteen and fourteen of chapter seven of 
the Militia Law the following, which might be printed and 
pasted over the original sections with but little expense or 
trouble. Thus : — 

(13.) For attendance and performance of duty at the 
May inspection, the officers shall receive two dollars, and the 
non-commissioned officers and privates one dollar, and the 
same sum for the training required prior to the annual 
encampment ; but no compensation shall be paid for any 
other company training. 

(14.) For attendance, subsistence, and performance of 
duty at any encampment, the officers shall receive the sum 
of three dollars, and non-commissioned officers and privates 
the sum of two dollars, per day, and transportation shall be 
furnished by the Quartermaster-General. For every horse 
required to be furnished there shall be allowed the sum of 
three dollars per diem. 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 63 

The expense incurred by officers far exceeds the amount 
received, and with three dollars a day they can no more 
than pay their expenses. 

They are required to furnish their own arms, equipments, 
and uniforms, necessitating a great outlay ; and,' aside from 
the varied duties required in managing the company affairs, 
obtaining and caring for armories, &c, they are required to 
furnish bonds to the Quartermaster-General, conditioned 
upon the faithful performance of duty, and safe keeping of 
the public property. 

No one not connected with the militia can form an ade- 
quate idea of the care and expense devolving upon officers; 
and it is no more than right that they should be, in part at 
least, compensated for such trouble and expense. 

MILITARY EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS. 

I believe that the introduction of military drill and dis- 
cipline into our high schools, academies, and colleges, 
would produce most beneficial results both to our youth 
and to the State. 

It would not only afford them an opportunity to become 
acquainted with the art of war, but it would give them that 
physical and mental exercise which they could in no other 
way obtain ; as it must be admitted by all that no exercise 
is so conducive to health as that of military drill. Massa- 
chusetts and other States are already introducing into their 
schools such drill,* 1 ' and I believe every State should encour- 
age the practice. 

If military drill could be made to take the place, in part 
at least, of base-ball and other athletic sports, it would be 
much better for our youth and for our State. 

DISCIPLINE. 

Discipline is the most essential feature of our militia, and 
should be maintained with rigor. However well calculated 
may be the law to render effective the militia, or however 
easily reduced -to practice and simple in detail may be its 
provisions, if the officers are guilty of negligence in the 



64: adjutant-general's report. 

discharge of their duties, or of a looseness in discipline, 
the unavoidable consequence of their example is a corre- 
sponding disregard of duty on the part of the soldier, and 
a tendency to destroy the efficiency and capacity of the 
militia to answer the great end for which it is designed. 

The officers are the source from which should emanate 
such precepts and examples as will tend to promote and 
enhance the proficiency and discipline of the service, and 
no apology can be given by those entrusted with commands 
for any act having a contrary effect. 

Although all able-bodied men (certain classes excepted) 
are by law liable to enrolment in the service of the State, 
no one is made an officer without the concurrence of his 
own will ; and he must therefore be held to a faithful dis- 
charge of his duty, conformably to the trust reposed in him 
and his oath of office. 

The major portion of our officers are competent and will- 
ing to perform their duties, but I believe the effectiveness 
of the volunteer militia would be much enhanced by your 
availing yourself of the authority granted by section fif- 
teen, chapter three, of the Militia Law ; thus doing away 
with the demoralizing practice of elections, and also by the 
creation of an examining board to inquire, when necessary, 
into the military capacity and moral fitness of officers. On 
the recommendation of said board, let the commission of 
the officer found incompetent be annulled, or let him retire 
by resignation. This would soon rid the service of all in- 
competent and useless officers. Both officers and men are 
too apt to think their duties and responsibilities of a trifling 
character, and that, when ordered out for drill or encamp- 
ment, it is more for a matter of form than for any actual 
service, and that it is to be an opportunity for carousal, and 
a general good time. This is entirely wrong. 

While on duty, the same discipline should be enforced 
and adhered to as would be required did the troops belong 
to the volunteer army of the United States, and no loose- 
ness or want of discipline should be tolerated. 

Camp and guard duty should be performed in the same 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 65 

prompt, soldierly, and precise manner which characterized 
our veterans in the late war. Regimental and company 
records and files should be kept in a neat and correct style, 
and all business transacted in the most military and prompt 
manner. Returns and reports should be made with the 
utmost care and exactness, and, in fact, everything consti- 
tuting a soldier's duty, should be done in all respects the 
same as if in the field. 

No man should unite himself with a volunteer company 
for the purpose of having a social time, or with the idea 
that his duties are to be a pastime merely ; but rather be- 
cause of the duty he owes to the State, and to aid in ren- 
dering the volunteer service a credit and safeguard to our 
people. 

Nor should any man be enlisted who is in any way, 
either morally or physically, disqualified to perform the 
duties of a true soldier, both in time of peace and time of 
war. 

We have plenty possessing ample qualifications to fill 
the ranks of a much larger force than is now required by 
law ; and the same rules should govern the enlistment of 
our militia force that govern that of the regular army. 
Care should also be taken to enlist only those who are in- 
tending to make the limits of the company or regiment 
their permanent residence, or at least to guard against the 
enlistment of persons who, in ten days, are in parts un- 
known. We could then boast of an efficient militia, sec- 
ond to that of no other State. 
5 



66 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL ENROLMENT. 

"Following will be seen the number of men liable to do 
military duty, as returned by the several town clerks, for 
1868; also, that of 1867, and the population of the State. 

The city of Concord and one or two other towns have 
failed to render any return, and it is therefore put in the 
same as last year. There appears to have been a gain of 
nine hundred and fifty-five since last year's report. 

It will be seen, by comparing the strength of our volun- 
teer force with the enrolments, that only about one twenty- 
sixth of the men subject to military duty are organized as 
active militia. 

Annual Enrolment, April 1868 and 1867, of every able- 
bodied white male citizen of this State, resident therein, of 
the age of eighteen years, and under the age of forty-five 
years, not by law exempt from doing military duty ; also, 
the population of each town, census of 1860. 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY. 



Towns. 



1868. 


1867. 


74 


70 


86 


86 


89 


105 


242 


224 


85 


164 


94 


90 


206 


204 


192 


278 


94 


103 


196 


159 


322 


332 


84 


73 



Population. 



Atkinson . 
Auburn 

Brentwood . 

Candia . . 

Chester . . 

Danville . . 

Deerfield . . 

Derry . . . 
East Kingston 

Epping . . 

Exeter . . 

Fremont . . 



546 

886 

887 
1,575 
1,276 

629 
2,066 
1,990 

598 
1.404 
3,309 

579 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



67 



Towns. 



1868. 



1867. 



Population. 



Gosport . . . 
Greenland . . 
Hampstead . 
Hampton . 
Hampton-Falls . 
Kensington . 
Kingston . . . 
Londonderry 
Newcastle . . 
Newington . 
Newmarket . 
Newton ... 
North-Hampton 
North wood . . 
Nottingham . 
Plaistow . . . 
Portsmouth . . 
Raymond . . . 
Eye .... 
Salem .... 
Sandown . 
Seab rook . . . 
South-Hampton . 
Sou th-Ne wmarket 
Strath am . . . 
Windham . . 



14 


17 


96 


73 


119 


127 


164 


187 


67 


89 


104 


95 


140 


143 


153 


144 


110 


180 


57 


55 


270 


246 


145 


134 


105 


101 


186 


156 


174 


178 


68 


102 


921 


1,534 


152 


185 


147 


136 


244 


246 


99 


90 


210 


254 


44 


52 


140 


76 


79 


90 


85 


109 


5,810 


6,657 



127 

762 

930 

1,230 

621 

672 

1,216 

1,717 

693 

475 

2,038 

850 

771 

1,502 

1,297 

861 

9,335 

1,269 

1,199 

1,671 

553 

1,549 

786 

549 

859 

851 



50,138 



STRAFFORD COUNTY. 



Barrington 



Dover 
Durham . 
Far min gton 
Lee . . 
Mad bury . 
Middleton 
Milton 



182 


150 


1,413 


1,227 


171 


118 


351 


367 


85 


116 


63 


65 


69 


50 


222 


212 



1,962 
8,502 
1,534 

2,275 
871 
496 
531 

1,862 



68 



adjutant-general's report. 



Towns. 


1868. 


1867. 


Population. 


New-Durham 

Rochester 

Rollinsford 

Somersworth 

Strafford 


135 
363 
154 
552 
249 


159 

595 
159 
545 

252 


1,174 

3,384 
3,069 
4,786 
2,046 




4,009 


4,015 


31,492 



BELKNAP COUNTY. 



Alton .... 
Barnstead . . 
Centre-Harbor . 
Gilford . . . 
Gilmanton . . 
Laconia . 
Meredith . . . 
New-Hampton . 
Sanbornton . . 
Upper-Gilmanton 



289 


293 


2,018 


252 


246 


1,885 


61 


58 


448 


365 


517 


2,812 


254 


200 


2,073 


264 


238 


1,806 


212 


269 


1,945 


142 


127 


1,596 


206 


226 


2,743 


121 


94 


1,189 


2,166 


2,267 


18,551 



Albany . . . 

Bartlett . . . 

Brookfield . . 

Chatham . . . 
Conway . 

Eaton . . . . 
Effingham 

Freedom . . . 
Hart's Location 

Jackson . . . 

Madison . . . 
Moultonborough 

Ossipee . . . 
Sandwich . 

Tarn worth . . 



Tuftonborough 



CARROLL COUNTY. 

68 

53 

53 

57 

214 

103 

136 

112 

9 

82 
125 
250 
228 
158 
122 



46 

64 
51 

198 

95 

130 

109 

9 

79 

83 

98 

250 

227 

140 

128 



430 

737 

472 

489 

1,624 

780 

1,210 

917 

44 

578 

826 

1,448 

1,998 

2,229 



,679 
,185 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



69 



Towns. 


1868. 


1867. 


Population. 


Wakefield 

Wolf borough ..... 


169 
301 


164 

255 


1,478 
2,300 




2,306 


2,126 


20,433 



MERRIMACK COUNTY. 



Allen stown 
Andover . 
Boscawen 
Bow . . 
Bradford . 
Canterbury 
Chichester 
Concord . 
Dumbarton 
Epsom 
Franklin . 
Henniker 
Hooksett . 
Hopkinton 
Loudon 
Newbury . 
New-London 
Northfield 
Pembroke 
Pittsfield . 
Salisbury . 
Sutton . . 
Warner . 
Webster . 
Wilmot . 



61 


50 


415 


151 


133 


1,243 


198 


150 


1,458 


96 


138 


909 


130 


174 


1,182 


129 


168 


■ 1,522 


124 


150 


1,043 


1,089 


1,089 


10,889 


120 


106 


902 


161 


172 


1,216 


247 


277 


1,600 


153 


155 


1,500 


229 


152 


1,257 


212 


195 


2,178 


220 


208 


1,638 


111 


90 


698 


B5 


81 


952 


84 


103 


1,051 


274 


243 


1,313 


253 


182 


1,839 


111 


111 


1,191 


164 


137 


1,431 


204 


239 


1,971 


70 


90 


817 


140 


131 


1,195 


4,806 


4,777 


41,409 



70 



adjutant-general's report, 
hillsborough county. 



Towns. 


1868. 


1867. 


Population. 


Amherst 


134 


132 


1,509 


Antrim 


147 


181 


1,123 


Bedford 


136 


157 


1,172 


Bennington 


58 


62 


450 


Brookline 


105 


118 


757 


Peering 


88 


76 


793 


Francestown 


130 


144 


1,084 


GofTstown 


130 


207 


1,740 


Greenfield 


46 


52 


692 


Hancock 


137 


135 


844 


Hillsborough 


205 


203 


1,623 


Hollis 


209 


169 


1,317 


Hudson 


132 


123 


1,222 


Litchfield 


48 


58 


352 


Lyndeborough 


114 


105 


823 


Manchester 


2.883 


2,282 


20,108 


Mason 


162 


114 


1,559 


Merrimack 


121 


126 


1,119 


Milford 


203 


215 


2,221 


Mont- Vernon 


88 


93 


725 


Nashua 


1,044 


682 


10,065 


New-Boston 


127 


137 


1,369 


New-Ipswich 


124 


128 


1,701 


Pelham 


113 


100 


944 


Peterborough 


370 


307 


2,265 


Sharon 


34 


27 


250 


Temple 


61 


50 


501 


Weare 


280 


215 


2,311 


Wilton 


243 


234 


1,368 


Windsor 


11 


14 


136 




7,783 


6,646 


62,142 



CHESHIRE 


COUNTY. 






Alstead 


174 


147 


1,318 


Chesterfield 


190 


162 


1,434 


Publin 


129 


116 


1,096 


Fitzwilliam . . . . . . 


172 


133 


1,293 



STATE OF NEW-HAMFSHIRE. 



71 



Towns. 


1868. 


1867. 


Population. 


Gilsum 


83 


77 


676 


Hinsdale 


102 


179 


1,312 


Jaffrey 

Keene 


185 
450 


176 
421 


1,452 
4,320 


Marlborough 

Marlow 


106 
116 


73 
110 


915 

813 


Nelson 


94 


98 


739 


Richmond 


82 


105 


1,015 


Rindge . 


141 


149 


1,230 


Roxbury 

Stoddard 


25 
104 


20 
97 


212 
944 


Sullivan 


52 


47 


376 


Surry 

Swanzey 

Troy 


48 

159 

95 


44 

185 
92 


388 

1,798 

760 


Walpole 

Westmoreland 


168 
159 


174 

130 


1,869 

1,285 


Winchester 


225 


138 


2,225 




3,059 


2,873 


27,470 



SULLIVAN COUNTY. 



Acworth . 
Charlestown 
Claremont 
Cornish . 
Croydon . 
Goshen . 
Grantham 
Langdon . 
Lempster . 
Newport . 
Plainfield 
Springfield 
Sunapee . 
Unity . . 
Washington , 



172 


162 


1,180 


213 


169 


1,758 


527 


392 


4,026 


161 


181 


1,521 


6b 


65 


755 


69 


56 


576 


90 


87 


649 


52 


46 


478 


79 


98 


820 


380 


312 


2,077 


215 


207 


1,620 


100 


115 


1,021 


105 


91 


778 


117 


117 


887 


113 


96 


897 


2,458 


2,195 


19,043 



72 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S REPORT. 



GRAFTON COUNTY. 



Towns. 



1868. 


1867. 


Population. 


105 


114 


1,253 


167 


98 


1,366 


67 


49 


459 


102 


90 


896 


44 


64 


560 


115 


144 


1,124 


128 


127 


1,319 


201 


257 


1,762 


84 


76 


947 


77 


76 


691 


30 


22 


302 


141 


183 


1,876 


59 


44 


708 


147 


157 


1,149 


95 


88 


778 


257 


190 


2,312 


184 


242 


2,291 


31 


38 


475 


72 


77 


917 


228 


238 


1,765 


112 


112 


1,013 


360 


206 


2,322 


6 


10 


71 


200 


338 


1,886 


280 


238 


2,292 


87 


95 


725 


109 


196 


1,572 


62 


54 


619 


48 


41 


382 


155 


147 


1,255 


128 


128 


949 


136 


130 


1,406 


152 


76 


1.104 


108 


126 


967 


136 


110 


1.152 


10 


7 


48 


108 


106 


1,056 


66 


76 


476 


4,597 


4,570 


42,245 



Alexandria 
Bath . . 
Benton 
Bethlehem . 
Bridgewater 
Bristol 
Campton . 
Canaan 
Danbury . 
Dorchester 
Ellsworth . 
Enfield . 
Franconia 
Grafton . 
Groton 
Hanover . 
Haverhill . 
Hebron 
Hill . . 
Holderness 
Landaff . 
Lebanon . 
Lincoln 
Lisbon 
Littleton . 
Lyman 
Lyme . 
Monroe 
Orange 
Orford . . 
Piermont . 
Plymouth 
Rumney . 
Thornton . 
Warren . 
Waterville 
Wentworth 
Woodstock 



STATE OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 
COOS COUNTY. 



73 



Towns. 


1868. 


1867. 


Population, 


Berlin ....*... 


36 




433 


Cambridge 


5 


3 


49 


Carroll 


54 


50 


276 


Clarksville 


51 


41 


250 


Colebrook 


142 


170 


1,118 


Columbia 


87 


77 


798 


Dalton ....... 


82 


78 


em 


Dummer 


49 


42 


287 


Errol 


25 


27 


178 


Gorham 


97 


86 


905 


Jefferson ....... 


38 


40 


700 


Lancaster 


163 


170 


2,020 




88 


85 


789 


Northumberland .... 


106 


107 


736 


Pittsburg 


82 


52 


413 


Randolph 


28 


25 


118 


Sherburne 


48 


46 


318 


Stark 


54 


62 


426 


Stewartstown 


136 


128 


771 


Strafford 


121 


116 


716 


Wentworth's Location . . 


8 


9 


57 


Whitefield 


114 


112 


1,015 




1,614 


1,526 


13,158 



RECAPITULATION BY COUNTIES. 



Rockingham 


5,810 


6,657 


50,129 


Strafford 


4,009 


4,015 


31,492 


Belknap 


2,166 


2,268 


18,551 


Carroll 


2,306 


2,126 


20,433 


Merrimack 


4,806 


4,777 


41,409 


Hillsborough 


7,783 


6,646 


62,142 


Cheshire 


3,059 


2,873 


27,470 


Sullivan 


2,458 


2,195 


19,043 


Grafton 


4,597 


4,570 


42,245 


Coos 


1,614 


1,526 


13,158 




38,608 


37,653 


326,172 



74 adjutant-general's report. 

LIST OF APPOINTMENTS IN THE REGULAR ARMY 

FROM NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 

It is thought that the following list will be of interest to 
our people, and is therefore published. The information 
has been obtained from official sources, and the list must 
contain the names of all now serving in the United States 
Army who were appointed from this State. 

There are very many who were born in New-Hampshire, 
but, having taken up their residences in other States, this 
does not get the credit of their appointment. 

John P. Sherburne, appointed 2d Lieut. 1st U. S. Infan- 
try, Jan. 27, 1856 ; appointed Colonel of U. S. Yols. ; 
appointed Major and Asst. Adjt.-Gen. of U. S. A., July 
17, 1862. 

Richard N. Batchelder, appointed A. Q. M. of U. S. A. 
Feb. 16, 1865 ; appointed Brig.-Gen. U. S. Vols., by brevet; 
brevetted Colonel of U. S. A., March 13, 1865 ; appointed 
Major and Q. M. of U. S. A., Jan. 18, 1867. 

Charles W. Foster, appointed Capt., Brevet Colonel, 
and Asst. Q. M. of U. S. A., Nov. 4, 1865; formerly Colo- 
nel by brevet of U. S. Vols. 

W. A. Wainwright, appointed Capt. and Asst. Q. M. of 
U. S. A., Jan. 18, 1867 ; brevetted Major of U. S. Yols. 

Thomas J. Haines, appointed 2d Lieut, by brevet of 1st 
Artillery, U. S. A., July 1, 1849 ; appointed Major and Asst. 
Com.-Gen. of Subsistence, U. S. A., Feb. 9, 1863; brevet- 
ted Brig.-Gen. of U. S. A., March 13,1865 ; formerly Colo- 
nel of U. S. Yols. 

Israel 0. Dewey, appointed Major and P. M., U. S. A., 
Jan. 17, 1867 ; formerly Major of U. S. Yols. 

Thomas J. Cram, appointed 2d Lieut, by brevet of 2d 
Artillery, U. S. A., July 1, 1826 ; resigned Sept. 16, 1836 ; 
appointed Capt. T. E., U. S. A., July 7, 1838 ; appointed 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 75 

Colonel and Chief of Engineers, IT. S. A., Nov. 23, 1865 ; 
brevetted Brig.-G-en. of U. S. Vols. ; brevetted Major-Gen. 
of U. S. A., Jan. 13, 1866. 

George Thom, appointed 2d Lieut. T. E., U. S. A., by 
brevet, July 1, 1839 ; appointed Colonel of U. S. Vols. ; 
brevetted Brig.-Gen., March 13, 1865 ; appointed Lieut.- 
Colonel and Chief of Engineers, July 10, 1866. 

John G. Foster, appointed 2d Lieut. U. S. A. by bre- 
vet, July 1, 1846 ; appointed Major-Gen. of U. S. Vols. ; 
brevetted Major-Gen. of U. S. A., March 13, 1865; ap- 
pointed Lieut.-Colonel and Chief of Engineers, U. S. A., 
March 7, 1867. 

James G. Benton, appointed 2d Lieut. U. S. A. by bre- 
vet, July 1, 1842 ; appointed Major and Chief of Ordnance, 
U. S. A., Sept. 15, 1863 ; brevetted Colonel of U. S. A., 
March 13, 1865. 

Thomas J. Treadwell, appointed 2d Lieut. U. S. A. by 
Drevet, July 1, 1854 ; brevetted Lieut.-Colonel, U. S. A., 
Vtarch 13, 1865 ; appointed Major and Chief of Ordnance, 
U. S. A., March 7, 1867. 

Stephen C. Lyford, appointed 2d Lieut. 1st Drag., U. S. 
i., by brevet, June 24, 1861 ; promoted to Capt. and 
hief of Ordnance, U. S. A., Sept. 15, 1863 ; brevetted 
Major of U. S. A., March 13, 1865. 

Joseph C. Clifford, appointed 2d Lieut. U. S. A., June 
), 1865 ; appointed 2d Lieut, and Chief of Ordnance, U. 

A., June 9, 1865 ; formerly 1st Lieut. 1st N. H. Heavy 
Artillery. 

Harrison Moulton, appointed 2d Lieut, of 1st Regt. of 

av., U. S. A., July 17, 1862; promoted to Capt. of 1st 
iegt. of Cav., U. S. A., April 11, 1866. 

Moses Harris, appointed 2d Lieut, of 1st Regt. of Cav., 
J. S. A., May 18, 1864 ; promoted to 1st Lieut., Aug. 15, 
864; brevetted Capt. of U. S. A., Sept. 19, 1864. 

John Steele, appointed 2d Lieut, of 2d Regt. of Cav.,U. 
5. A., March 7, 1867 ; formerly 1st Lieut. 1st N. H. Cav. 



76 adjutant-general's report. 

Benj. T. Hutchins, appointed 1st Lieut, of 6th Regt. of 
Cav., U. S. A., May 14, 1861 ; promoted to Capt., Nov. 19, 
1863 ; brevetted Major of 6th Regt. U. S. Cav., March 13, 

1865 ; formerly Lieut.-Colonel 1st N. H. Y. Cav. 
Clarence E. Nesmith, appointed 2d Lieut, of 6th Regt. 

Cav., U. S. A., April 18, 1866; promoted to 1st Lieut, 
and Regt. Com., Dec. 12, 1866 ; formerly Brevet Major U. 
S. V. and Com. of Sub. 

George P. Thyng, appointed 2d Lieut. 1st Regt. Artil- 
lery, U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866 ; promoted to 1st Lieut., July 
28, 1866 ; formerly Capt. 1st N. H. Heavy Artillery. 

James M. Robertson, appointed 2d Lieut, by brevet in 
2d Regt. of Artillery, U. S. A., June 28, 1848 ; promoted 
to Capt., May 14, 1861; brevetted Brig.-Gen. U. S. A., 
March 13, 1865. 

Geo. K. Dakin, appointed 2d Lieut. 3d Regt. of Artillery, 
U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866 ; promoted to 1st Lieut., July 28, 

1866 ; formerly Capt. 1st N. H. Heavy Artillery. 
Joseph B. Campbell, appointed 2d Lieut, by brevet in 4th 

Regt. of Artillery, U.S.A., June 24, 1861 ; appointed Capt. of 
Vols.; brevetted Major U. S. A., Sept. 17, 1862; appointed 
Capt. in 4th Regt. Arty., U. S. A., Feb. 15, 1867. 

John P. Thompson, appointed 2d Lieut, in 4th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 23,1866 ; promoted 1st Lieut., July 
24, 1867 ; formerly 1st Lieut. 1st N. H. Cavalry. 

Edward L. Bailey, appointed 2d Lieut, of 4th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., March 7, 1867 ; formerly Colonel of 2d 
Regt. N. H. Vols. 

William Badger, appointed 2d Lieut, of 7th Regt. of In- 
fantry, May 19, 1866; promoted to 1st Lieut., Feb. 25, 

1867 ; formerly Brevet Major U. S. Vols. 
Oscar A. Mack, appointed 2d Lieut, by brevet in 3d 

Artillery, U. S. A., July 1, 1850 ; appointed Major in U. S. 
Vols. ; brevetted Colonel, March 13, 1865 ; appointed Major 
in 9th Regt. of Infantry, U. S. A., June 19, 1866. 

John D. Devin, appointed 2d Lieut, in 9th Regt. of In- 
fantry, U.S.A., April 26, 1861; promoted to Capt., March 



STATE OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 7 

9, 1863 ; brevetted Lieut.-Colonel U. S. Vols., March 13, 
1865. 

Louis A. Nesmith, appointed 2d Lieut, in 12th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Jan. 22, 1867 ; formerly 2d Lieut. U. S. 
Vols. 

Oscar I. Converse, appointed 2d Lieut, in 14th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866 ; promoted to 1st Lieut., 
May 31, 1866 ; formerly 1st Lieut. 1st N. H. Cavalry. 

Lyman H. Warren, appointed 2d Lieut, in 17th Regt. 
of Infantry, U. S. A., Oct. 13, 1862 ; brevetted Capt., July 
2, 1863 ; appointed Capt., Oct. 25, 1865. 

Chas. 0. Bradley, appointed 2d Lieut, in 11th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866; promoted to 1st Lieut, 
in 20th Regt. of Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866 ; for- 
merly Capt. 13th N.H.Vols. and 1st N.H. Heavy Artillery. 

John C. Currier, appointed 2d Lieut, in 21st Regt. of 
Infantry, U.S.A., Jan. 22, 1867 ; formerly Capt. 11th N. H. 
Vols. 

Frederick L. Dodge, appointed 2d Lieut, in 23d Regt. 
Infantry, U. S. A., March 7, 1867 ; formerly 1st Lieut. 18th 
N. H. Vols. 

John R. Hynes, appointed 2d Lieut in 24th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Jan. 22, 1867 ; formerly Lieut.-Colonel 
by brevet and A. Q. M. Vols. 

James F. Grimes, appointed Capt. in 17th Regt. of In- 
fantry, U. S. A., Aug. 5, 1861 ; appointed Capt. in 26th 
Regt. of Infantry, Aug. 5, 1861 ; brevetted Lieut.-Colonel, 
March 13, 1865. 

Welcome A. Crafts, appointed 2d Lieut, in 17th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., April 6, 1866 ; promoted to Capt. in 
26th Regt. of Infantry, U. S. A., July 28, 1866 ; formerly 
Colonel 5th N. H. Vols. 

John C. Jenness, appointed 2d Lieut. 27th Regt of In- 
fantry, U. S. A., July 28, 1866; promoted to 1st Lieut., 
March 5, 1867; formerly 1st Lieut. 1st N. H. Heavy 
Artillery ; killed on Western frontier. 



78 adjutant-general's report. 

Thomas Connolly, appointed 2d Lieut, in 27th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Jan. 22,1867; promoted to 1st Lieut., 
July 1, 1867 ; formerly Major 8th N. H. Vols. 

George F. Towle, appointed 2d Lieut, in 19th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866 ; promoted to 1st Lieut, 
in 28th Regt. of Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 23, 1866 ; for- 
merly Lieut.-Colonel 4th N. H. Vols. 

Ira McL. Barton, appointed 2d Lieut in 19th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., May 11, 1866 ; appointed 2d Lieut, in 
28th Regt. of Infantry", IT. S. A., May 11, 1866 ; formerly 
Lieut.-Colonel 1st N. H. Heavy Artillery. 

Joseph H. Potter, appointed Brevet 2d Lieut. 1st In- 
fantry, U. S. A., July 1, 1843 ; appointed Brig.-Gen. in 
volunteer service; bre vetted Brig.-Gen. in U. S. A., March 
13,1865; appointed Lieut.-Colonel in 30th Infantry, U. S, 
A., July 28, 1866 ; formerly Colonel 12th N. H. Vols. 

Ebenezer Gay, appointed Brevet 2d Lieut. 1st Dragoons, 
U. S. A., July 1, 1855 ; promoted to Capt. in 34th Infantry, 
U. S. A., March 14, 1861 ; appointed Lieut.-Colonel by 
brevet U. S. Vols., Sept. 1, 1864. 

Charles E. Drew, appointed 2d Lieut, in 16th Regt. 
of Infantry, U. S. A., March 8, 1866; promoted to 1st 
Lieut, in 34th Regt. of Infantry, U. S. A., July 31, 1867 ; 
formerly 1st Lieut, in U. S. Vols. 

James A. Hopkins, appointed 2d Lieut, in 17th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Oct. 31, 1863 ; brevetted Capt., Aug. 19, 
1864 ; appointed Capt. in 35th Regt. of U. S. Infantry, 
March 1st, 1866. 

James J. Emerson, appointed 2d Lieut, in 17th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Feb. 19, 1863 ; brevetted Capt., Aug. I 
1864 ; appointed Capt. in 26th Regt. U. S. Infantry, Jan. 
8, 1866. 

John W. Bean, appointed 2d Lieut, in 35th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., Jan. 22, 1867 ; formerly Capt. in U. S. 
Vols. 

J. M. Thompson, appointed 2d Lieut, in 38th Regt. of 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 79 

Infantry, U. S. A., July 28, 1866 ; formerly Capt. in U. S. 
Wols. 

James F. Randlett, appointed Capt. in 39th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., June 6, 186T ; formerly Lieut.-Colonel 
3d N. H. Vols. 

Baxter H. Quimby, appointed 2d Lieut, in 39th Regt. of 
Infantry, U. S. A., July 28, 1866 ; promoted to 1st Lieut., 
July 31, 1867 ; formerly Capt. 9th N. H. Vols. 

Frederic A. Kendall, appointed 2d Lieut, in 40th Regt. 
of Infantry, U. S. A., July 28, 1866 ; promoted to 1st 
Lieut., July 31, 1867 ; formerly Capt. 4th N. H. Vols. 

RETIRED FROM ACTIVE SERVICE. 

Albemarle Cady, appointed Brevet 2d Lieut, in 6th 
Regt. of Infantry, U. S. A., July 1, 1829 ; promoted to 
Colonel in 8th Infantry, U. S. A., Oct. 20, 1863; retired, 
May 18, 1864 ; brevetted Brig.-General, March 13, 1865. 

Ai B. Thompson, appointed Capt. in 18th Infantry, 
U. S. A., Aug. 5, 1861 ; brevetted Major, Dec. 31, 1862 ; 
retired, May 6, 1864 ; formerly 2d Lieut. 2d N. H. Vols. 

Charles Holmes, appointed Capt. in 17th Infantry, 
U. S. A., Oct. 26, 1861 ; retired, Nov. 28, 1863 ; formerly 
2d Lieut. 2d N. H. Vols. 

William F. Goodwin, appointed 1st Lieut, in 16th In- 
fantry, U. S. A., May 14, 1861 ; brevetted Capt., Sept. 20, 
1863; appointed Capt., May 14, 1864; retired, Feb. 11, 
1865. 

M. N. Hutchins, appointed 2d Lieut, in 18th Infantry, 
U. S. A., June 9, 1862; promoted to 1st Lieut., Jan. 14, 
1863 ; brevetted Capt., Sept. 20, 1863 ; retired, Jan. 6, 
1864. 

William T. Pennock, appointed 2d Lieut. 1st Cavalry, 
U. S. A., July 17, 1862 ; promoted to 1st Lieut., Sept. 1, 
1863; brevetted Capt., May 1,1864; retired, July 1, 1865. 



80 



QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

Under this head I have not much report to make, except 
to give a statement of the public property in the possession 
of the State, as its duties are so closely allied to those per- 
taining to the Adjutant, Inspector, and Commissary Gen- 
eral's (all of which I have to perform) that no real distinc- 
tion can be made. 

In almost every other State, these departments are kept 
distinct, and are managed by different officers ; but, with us, 
one officer performs the duties of each, and it is therefore use- 
less to attempt to keep the duties of the several departments 
separate. In everything pertaining to this department, I have 
practised the strictest economy, whether it be in purchas- 
ing stores, obtaining transporation, loans and favors, or in 
performing the labor required to be done. Other States — 
and ours ought to — have a State armorer, whose duty it is 
to care for the property and keep it in repair, and is paid a 
living salary for his services. In shipping, receiving, re- 
pairing and cleaning arms, and caring for the three hundred 
thousand dollars' worth of property, I have paid the sum of 
one hundred and twenty dollars and eighty-three cents dur- 
ing the year, which certainly cannot be considered as ex- 
travagant. 

During the past year, I have succeeded in gathering in 
and obtaining information of property to a very consider- 
able value, as will be seen by Abstract B. 

Doubtless much more is still in the hands of individuals 
and towns ; but there seems to be a disposition to withhold 
all information concerning it, and consequently it is diffi- 
cult to learn its whereabouts. Since the date of my last 
report, I have purchased, by your order, various articles of 
quartermaster stores and camp equipage, as will be seen by 
Abstract A ; and it is hoped that, during the ensuing year, 
but few purchases will have to be made, as the militia is 
now very well equipped. 

The tents purchased are made in a substantial manner, 
are of the very best material, and, with proper care, will 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 81 

last a great many years. If the militia is organized into 
three regiments, as I recommend, it is my opinion that it 
would be economy on the part of the State to obtain tents 
for each regiment, which should be issued to the regiment- 
al quartermaster, and kept at regimental headquarters. 
This would save the expense of transportation to and from 
the several encampments, which, in a few years, would 
amount to the cost of such property. 

The quartermasters are required to give bonds, and the 
property would be perfectly safe in their hands. 
6 









ABSTRACTS AND RETURN. 

The following abstracts represent all military property 
in the possession of the State at the commencement of 
the year ; property received by purchase ; property found 
and taken up ; property issued to the volunteer militia, to 
public institutions, towns and individuals ; property lost or 
destroyed and expended during the year ; property now in 
the possession of the militia, public institutions, &c. ; 
property remaining on hand in the storehouse at Concord ; 
and the total amount of public property in the possession 
of the State. Proper returns have been received from 
each of the companies, excepting the State Capital Guards, 
Capt. H. J. Griffin, and the Manchester War Veterans. 
In these cases I have been obliged to make up the returns 
from the records of this office. 

The return covers the several abstracts, and shows at a 
glance the amount and disposition of all public property in 
the possession of the State. 

The property remaining on hand in storehouse, in pos- 
session of the militia, independent organizations, public 
institutions, &c, June 1, 1867, added to that received by 
abstracts A and B, makes the total amount of property to be 
accounted for. That issued to the militia during the year, 
added to that in its possession June 1, 1867, makes the 
total to be accounted for by the militia. The property 
turned in, lost, and destroyed, subtracted from the amount 
to be accounted for, leaves the amount now on hand by the 
militia. The property issued to independent organizations, 
&c, and that on hand June 1, 1867, makes the amount now 
on hand ; which, with that in possession of the militia and 
that in the storehouse at Concord, makes the total amount 
of property in the possession of the State, showing a loss of 
so much as is reported as "lost or destroyed." 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



83 



ABSTRACT "A." 

Abstract of Articles purchased for the use of the Volunteer Militia 
during the Year ending June 1, 1868. 



Date. 

1867. 


Of whom purchased. 


Amount. 


6 

E 
5 



e 
-/. 

a 
c 


■A 

.V 


X 

x 

u 


GO 

o 

GO 

"a 

l 

53 

X 


o 

x 

1 

X 


C 

5 

GE 

pq 


X 

- 


GO* 


CO 
V 

"o 
ft 

a 

"eg 


02 

a 
ft 

as 

H 


co" 

ft 
o 

*Q 

<B 

IS 

c8 
Q 


Aug. 22 




$3,622 00 
129 50 






1 














Sept. 4 
Sept. 12 
Oct. 11 




10 


10 


6 
















William Read. & Sons 


419 50 
3,000 13 
308 00 
1' 00 
240 75 
518 10 

325 00 

60 00 
160 00 

24 00 




15 30 


45 


40 














100 


300 


3,450 




Oct. 11 




1500 


Oct. 11 


E. D Chamberlin 
























Oct. 14 


























Oct. 25 


R. M. Yale 
























1868. 
Feb. 10 


























Feb. 21 


























April 22 


I). Appleton & Co 
























April 30 








12 

is 








































$8,818 98 


10 10 


15 30 


45 


40 


100 


30" 


3,450 


1500 






84 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL 7 S REPORT. 



ABSTRACT "A" — concluded. 

Abstract of Articles purchased for the use of the Volunteer Militia 

during the Year ending June 1, 1868. 



'3 


e£ 

P. 

c 


2 
ca 

--J 

'■£ 



O 

& 

8 

a 
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02 


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co co 

X 7. 

1:1 




















250 


250 


24 


350 3f 


900 


50 K<1 








































































































1,500 


4 




































1 


































150 




































30 


90 


































50 




































50 




























100 


































































1 


250 


30 


90 


50 


50 


250 


250 


24 


350 








50 


50 




1,500 


4 


300 


550 


900 





STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



85 



ABSTRACT "B." 

Abstract of Property found and taken up during the Year ending 
June 1, 1868. 



Where. 


93 
N 

a 

O 

Jo 
R 

a 
be 

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CD 
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o 


a 
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fee 

03 

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93 

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5 
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o 

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2 

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03 


2 
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5 


03 
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03 
fed 

s 


03 

3 

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fee 

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— 

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| 

3 


CO 

93 

a 


93 

CO 

03 

ct 


P 

CO 
13 
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a 


s 

3 
3 

~i 

fee 

3 


CO 
03 

a 

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5 
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3 

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a 
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a 

1 

03 

03 

O 


2 

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03 

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35 

93 
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3 

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03 


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03 
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5 

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03 

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03 

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fee 
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03 
CO 


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a 



"3, 

3 

H 


O 

c 

03 

5 
a 

Q 


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2 


X 

fee 


T3 
e3 
32 


Concord 

Chatham 

Merrimack . . 


1 










2 

2 


i 
l 


1 

1 


i 
l 


2 

2 

4 


'i 


1 

i 

1 


1 
i 

2 


i 

l 


i 

i 


"(58 

"64 

"75 

207 


65 

24 

89 


40 

19 
50 


34 
34 


34 
34 


39 
1 


34 
34 


34 
34 


1 

1 


i 

i 

i 

2 

5 


1 
1 


1 
1 




New-Boston . 

Alstead 

Manchester. . 
Keene 


1 






1 

1 


1 

1 




Orange 

Nashua 

Warner 

Dover 

Acworth .... 
Epsom 


1 
1 

4 


~ 




3 

3 



adjutant-general's report. 

ABSTRACT «<C." 

Abstract of Public Property in the 



Name of Company. 


© 

© 

a 

o 
o 

© 

09 

a 

s 

"u 

1 
w 


.2 
"S. 

a 

o 
H 


© 



© 

© 

02 


00 

2 

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i 

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9 





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M 

02 

S 

eS 


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ce 

to 
u 




DQ 


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O 

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tt> 
.5 

a 

m 


2 


a 


© 

3 

co 

© 

a 

r-t 


© 
X 


.a 
© 




Company A, First Regiment 

Company B, First Regiment 

Company C, First Regiment 

Company D, First Regiment 

Company E, First Regiment 

Company F, First Regiment 

Company G, First Regiment 

Company H, First Regiment 

Company I, First Regiment 

Company K, First Regiment 

Company L, First Regiment 

Company M, First Regiment 


58 
50 
48 
50 
50 
50 
50 
49 
47 
50 
50 
50 


58 

"35 
50 
50 
38 
50 
49 
38 
50 
33 
50 


60 
50 
18 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 


60 
50 
44 
50 
50 
35 
50 
50 
50 
50 
43 


60 
50 
41 
50 
50 
35 
50 
50 
50 
50 
40 


15 
10 

7 
12 


15 
8 


6 
3 


6, 6 
2 6 


15 
10 
8 
12 

'"i 

•-12 


56 
50 
49 


12 


5 

5 

"h 

5 
5 
5 
4 


51 5 
5 B 


50 
50 


4 
12 
12 
12 
12 

3 


4 
10 
10 
12 
12 

4 


4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 


5 
5 
5 
5 
4 


50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 






























58 


58 






5 


5 






58 


First Light Battery, Section B.. . 


















Company A, Second Regiment.. . 
Company B, Second Regiment. . . 
Company C, Second Regiment... 
Company D, Second Regiment. . . 
Company E, Second Regiment.. . 
Company F, Second Regiment. . . 
Company G, Second Regiment... 
Company H, Second Regiment. . . 
Company I. Second Regiment.. . 
Company K, Second Regiment. . . 
Company L, Second Regiment.. . 
Company M, Second Regiment. . . 


50 
50 
52 
49 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
49 
49 
50 
50 


50 

50 

"49 
50 
38 
50 
50 
40 
50 
49 
49 
41 
46 


50 
50 
48 
50 
50 
38 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
49 
50 
50 


46 

50 
48 
50 
50 
35 
50 
40 
50 
50 
50 
49 
50 
50 


49 
50 
48 
50 
50 
21 
50 
42 
50 
50 
50 
49 
50 
50 


11 

5 
3 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 


11 

5 
5 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
12 

"io 

10 
10 
10 


5 
5 
4 
5 
5 
3 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


5 
5 
4 
5 
5 

"5 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


5 
5 
4 
5 
5 
1 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


12 
5 
9 

9 
10 
10 
12 
12 

"u 

12 

19 


50 
50 
48 
50 
50 
48 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
49 
50 




5 12 


50 








50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


12 


10 


5 


5 


5 12 


50 


Field and staff, First Regiment . . 




Field and staff, Second Regiment 
























1352!ll63ll25lll308 


1293 


•262 


222 


1-20 


119 


116 212 


1408 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



87 



ABSTRACT " C " — continued, 
possession of the Volunteer Militia, June 1, 1868. 

































Scales. 




















to 
"3 








































T5 






a 
















-r 
















«H 








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02 

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05 


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2 


03 

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03 

fee 


02 




3 

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5 


s. 


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1) 
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* 





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Si 

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56 


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56 


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48 


48 


19 


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43 


50 


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49 


47 




50 


50 


54 


50 


50 


1 


1 




1 








49 


49 


48 


4 


44 


39 


3 




39 


32 




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49 


50 


48 


48 


1 


1 




1 




2 


2 


43 


44 


39 


2 


33 


33 


4 




33 


33 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


1 




1 








50 


37 


50 


4 


44 


30 


5 




30 


15 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


50 


50 


48 


4 


44 


50 


6 




50 


50 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 








1 


1 


2 


3 


48 


48 


48 


4 


44 


50 


3 




50 


50 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


i 




1 




2 


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48 


48 


48 


4 


44 


50 


4 




100 


50 




50 


50 


50 


50 


49 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


50 


50 


50 


4 


44 


50 


6 




50 






50 


50 


48 


50 


48 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


47 


47 


48 


4 


47 


48 


4 




48 


43 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 
















50 


50 


48 


4 


44 


50 


6 




50 






50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


i 


i 




i 


i 




i 


46 


46 


46 


4 


46 


50 


5 










50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


1 




l 








48 


48 


48 
50 
63 
50 
50 
50 


4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 


44 
44 
43 
44 
40 
44 


50 

"48 
50 


1 
4 
4 

7 


1000 




50 


'-8 


58 

"50 

50 


59 

"50 

50 


59 

"51 

50 


59 

"50 
50 


59 

"50 
50 


1 

i 
1 


"2 
1 




1 

i 

1 


'i 
1 


*2 
2 


3 
3 


50 

"50 
50 


63 

50 
50 














50 
46 
50 






47 
50 




6 






48 


48 


48 


48 


42 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


56 


48 


48 


2 


53 


64 


5 




58 


50 




50 


50 


50 


50 


49 


1 






i 


1 


9 ( 


3 


50 


50 


49 


4 


44 


30 


6 






50 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


1 




1 


i 


2 


3 


48 


48 


48 


4 


44 


48 


6 




48 


48 




48 


49 


49 


49 


51 


1 


1 




l 


1 


2 


3 


47 


48 


44 


4 


38 


44 


5 




41 


42 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


3 


48 


48 


48 


4 


45 


50 


5 




50 


50 




50 


50 


50 


50 


50 


1 


1 




1 


1 


2 


.'5 


48 


48 


47 


4 


44 


48 


5 




44 


42 




49 
50 


49 
50 


50 
50 


49 
50 


49 
50 


1 
1 


1 
1 




1 
l 


1 


'( 


,3 


48 
50 


48 
50 


48 
48 


4 
4 


44 
44 


50 
50 


6 

6 












48 






50 
49 
50 
50 

"50 


50 
49 
50 
50 

"50 


50 
49 
50 
50 


50 
49 
50 
50 


49 
49 
50 
50 


] 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

1 

1 




1 

1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


2 
2 
2 

2 


3 
3 

3 


48 
47 
50 
50 


48 
47 
50 
49 


48 
47 
50 
50 
48 
50 


4 
4 
4 
4 


44 
43 
44 

44 


50 

47 
50 
50 


7 
6 
5 
6 
8 
6 






50 






























50 




50 


50 


50 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 
3 
3 


2 

i 


3 
3 

4 


50 


50 




44 




































24 


24 


24 
















18 





_: 





































1408 


1409 


U'4 


140« 


1 101 op 95 97 


96 9fi 


•}0 


fit 


1391 


1384 


1500 


111 


131.1 


1229 


156 


1000 


885 


898 96 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL >S REPORT. 



ABSTRACT " C " — continued. 

Abstract of Public Property in the 



Name of Company. 


CO 

<o 
A 

f! 

11 

cS i 
02 


o 
.* 

>, 

g 

! o3 

- 2 
i a 

5 S 
J <B 
3 tf 


IS 

<r. 
O 
>. 

6 

C 
c 

_c 
S 


Screw-drivers. 

Spring vises. 

Brush-wipers and thongs. 

Carbine cartridges, boxes. 

Carbine slings. 

Carbine sockets and straps. 

Carbine cap pouches and cone picks. 

Saddles, with stirrup and stirrup leathers. 

Surcingles. 

Girths. 

Curb bridles. 


u S 6 . 
^ ** lis r§ 

1 1 1 gJ8 -2 

j£ £ x yj o W 


Company A, First Regiment 
















Company B, First Kegiment 
















Company C, First Regiment 
















































Company F, First Regiment 
















Company G, First Regiment 
















Company H, First Regiment 
















Company I, First Regiment 
















Company K, First Regiment 
















Company L, First Kegiment 
















Company M, First Regiment 
















First Company Cavalry 


501 











. .. 50 50 50 50 50 5 


6 50 50 50 50 50 50 


Lafayette Artillery Company.... 












| 


First Light Battery, Section B . . . 


48. 










8 8 8 


8 8 8 8 8 832 


Company A, Second Regiment.. . 














Company B, Second Regiment. . . 
















Company C, Second Regiment. . . 
















Company D, Second Regiment. . . 
















Company E, Second Regiment. . . 
















Company F, Second Regiment. . . 
















Company G, Second Regiment . . 
















Company H, Second Regiment. . . 
















Company I, Second Regiment. . . 
































































































First Light Battery, Section A. . . 


50 




























Field and statf, First Regiment. . 
















Field and staff, Second Regiment 
































148, 


50 








50 50 58 58 58 E 


8*58 58 58 58 58 82 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



89 



ABSTRACT " C " — continued, 
possession of the Volunteer Militia June 1, 1868. 



as 

as 
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as 
B 

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00 

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c 


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ft 
to 


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ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



ABSTRACT "C"- concluded. 

Abstract of Public Property in the 



Name of Company. 


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Company C, First Regiment 

Company D, First Regiment 

Company E, First Regiment 

Company F, First Regiment 

Company G, First Regiment 

Company H, First Regiment 

Company I, First Regiment 

Company K, First Regiment 

Company L, First Regiment 

Company M, First Regiment 

First Company Cavalry 

Lafayette Artillery Company 

First Light Battery, Section B . . . 
Company A, Second Regiment. . . 
Company B, Second Regiment. . . 
Company C, Second Regiment. . . 
Company D, Second Regiment. . . 
Company E, Second Regiment. . . 
Company F, Second Regiment. . . 
Company G, Second Regiment. . . 
Company H, Second Regiment. . . 
Company I, Second Regiment. . . 
Company K, Second Regiment.. . 
Company L, Second Regiment. . . 
Company M, Second Regiment. . . 


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STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



91 



ABSTRACT "C» — concluded. 

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Capt. W. C. Parker, Co. A, 1st Regt .... 

" W. R. Patten, Co. I, 1st Regt 

« C. R. Stickney, Co. H, 1st Regt. . . . 

" 0. P. Newcomb, Parker Guards. . , 

•* J. H. Bean, Newfound Lake Rifles 

" 0. P. Newcomb, Parker Guards. . . 

« 0. R. Stioknev, Co. H, 1st Regt, . . . 

" J H. Beau. Newfound Lake Rifles 
Lieut. E. H. Hobbs, 1st Lt. Bat, Soc. B. . 

Capt. C. IT. Holt, Lafavctte Artillery 

Capt. C. II. Roed, Co. B. 1st Regt 

Lieut. R. A. Seaver, Co. C, 1st Hogt 

Capt. IT. J. Griffin, Co F, 1st; Regt 

" Wm. Milieu, Co. B, 2d Regt 

" F. F. Davis, 1st Lt. Bat. Sec. A 

" A. A. Clark, Co. K. 1st Regt 

'< R, A. Soaver, Co. C, 1st Hogt 

" A. 11. C. Jewett, Co. G, 2d Regt. . . . 

" J. II. Bean, Newfound Lake Rifles. 
Lieut. Clarendon Evorott, Adjt. 2d Regt. 


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adjutant-general's report. 



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STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



101 



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::—::: 12 


Dt. J. T. Williams, Co. I, 2d Regt 
' Bela Sawyer, Co. K, " 
C. N. Camp, Co. L, " 
W. A.Beckford, Co. M, " 
O.P.Nowcomb, Parker Guards 
J. H. Bean, New'd Lake Rifles 
F. F. Davis, 1st Lt. Bat. Sec. A 


eg- - - 
O 




- 



102 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S REPORT. 









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STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



103 





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104 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



ABSTRACT " H . " 

Abstract of Public Property issued to Independent Organizations, 
Public Institutions, &c, during the Year ending June 1, 18G8. 



To whom issued. 



Selectmen of Claremont 

Reuben Rand, Portsmouth. 

Selectmen of Keene 

Langdon Lear, Epsom 



Total. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



105 



ANNUAL RETURN 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster's - stores, received, 
issued, and remaining on hand during the year ending June 
1, 1868. 





Class 1. 
Ordnance. 


Class 2. 
Artillery car- 
riages. 


Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 


2 
o 
■£ 

■■h 


GO 

5 
-r 


1 

is 

o 

13 


B 

a 

so 


5 

s: 

% 
© 

| 

! 

c 

CI 


1 

i 


t 

o 

c 

'c 
o 

1 


N 

£ 

± 


5 

be 
5 


X 

1 


DC 

c 
p 
SI 

t 

1 


5C 

:_ 

'J 
c 

13 


bo 

u 


X 

«3 
c 

c 

s 

p. 


X 

M 

(0 

1- 

•7. 
/. 

3 


SB 

S) 

% 

c'i 
t-l 

1 

TO 

1 

3 




2 
1 


1 


2 


2 

2 

2 


9 9 


2 






1' 


9 


..2 2 

lit 

|!T' 


9 


In possession of Militia, June 1, 1867 

In possession of independent organizations and 
public institutions, June 1, 1867 






..i .. 








1 

2 


2 
2 
2 


6 


•' 


2 


2 


4 
4 


1 
1 


2.. .. 
2 6 1 2 


i'..L 

4 2 4 

~~rr 






3 


? 






9 


Total to be accounted for by Militia 


1 




1 




llp_ 

•• | 2; 2 


~\~~2 


2 




1 


~" 


2 


2 

2 
2 



9 


~ 


2 

2 


4 


1 


lirrH'T' 

•••••••••■•• 

2 2 | 2 3 .... 

9! x\ 9 9 




Total turned in, lost or destroyed 


9, 


Issued to independent organizations, &c 

In possession of independent organizations, &c. 


1 
2 


_ 
1 

1 




Total property in possession of State 


3 


_ 
2 


~2 


2 


2 


4 


_ 
1 


2 


6 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 



106 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL EETUK T$ — continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster's stores, received, issued., 





Class 2 
conclu'd, 


Class 3. — Artillery imple- 
ments and equipments. 


Disposition of Ordnance Stores, Julie 1,1868. 


o 
o 

< 
"-'■ 

bp 

"3 
H 


S 

o 

> 

3 


c 

1 


1 


~ 




p 


Z 


3 

o 
3 

* 

a; 


| 


to 


-/. 


' i. 


■r. 


09 


BO 

"go 


•3 
O 
O 

3 

3 
'J 


On hand in storehouse, June 1. 1867 . 


1 


i 


2 






6 
2 

8 
2 

4 


14 
4 

18 
4 
8 


1 


2G 

8 


6 
6 


1 


6 
2 

8 
2 
4 


1 

1 


13 
2 


IS 
6 


18 

2 

■Ml 


2 
1 


In possession of independent organizations 
and public institutions, June 1, 1867....... 

Received as per abstract " A " 








i 

l 


i 
l 


1 


■:4 




1 


1 


?, 


15:24 








8 


^ 


. 

2 4 -2 






I 






16 




4 




10 4 




— 




— 


— 


















Lost or destroyed by Militia. 

Total turned in, lost or destroyed 












4 
4 


8 
10 




16 

18 


6 


1 


4 

4 
4 


i 
7 


4 

11 


.... 
4. 

4 

. . . 

141R 


2 
2 


Issued to independent organizations, &c 

In possession of independent organizations,&c 


1 

1 


i 


?, 


l 


i 
1 


Total property in possession of the State. 


i 


2 


18 


1 


'4 


"6" 


1 


13 


24 20 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



107 



ANNUAL EETU R N — continued, 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 



Class 3. — Artillery implements and equipments. 





o 

-a 

c 

3 


'5 
- 

£ 

CO 
,W 

'£, 
X 

M 


'/J 


CO 


Harnesses, and parts of. 


X 

p 

O 

o 

eg 


X 

iX 

a 
to 

S3 

ea 

11 


X 

33 

O 
-J 
-M 

■£ 

S3 

Xj 

eg 

S3 


X 

5 


i 

X 

it 

1 


x" 

p 

M 
o 


X 

il 

"is 

bJD 

1 


"S3 
ej 


X 

iJD 

3 
o 


c 

5 
c 


5 

o 

5 

CO 

S3 

72 


X 

Cv 

c 


co 

88 

"S3 


5 
<1 




^2 
3 <u 




13 

1 

o 
03 

xr 

O 
X 
fi 

'1/ 

eg 


i 

X 

-_ 

X 

c 

X. 


q3 
o 


5 


a 
1 


• 

as 


Si 
o 
° 


in 

5 


s 

1 


X 

S3 
'eg 

w 


co 

~i 

eg 

X 

(5 


"S3 

V 

x' 

O) 


9 


X 

S 

X 

J. 

X 

"S3 


CO 


i 

to 

> 
CD 
(0 

y. 

S3 
G 
G 
a 



X 

S3 

SI 

o 

-■ 

•4= 


X 

PI 
taj 

a 
to 


■ji 

■-* 
a 

N 

'% 

O 

3 

o 

a 
^* 
a 


2 


4 
2 

6 

2 


16 

2 

i 

25 
G 
12 

12 

3 
8 

25 


8 

8 
2 

2 

2 

6 

8 


2 

2 

2 
2 


12 
8 

"4 

24 
8 
Ifi 

10 

4 
4 
2! 


10 

8 

18 
8 
16 

16 

2 

is 


6 
6 

6 

G 


"8 

i 

9 
8 

8 
1 
9 


28 
8 

36 
16 

24 

'8 

8 
10 

12 

28 


6 
6 

6 




6 


16 


25 
25 

25 

25 


12 

_ 

12 
12 


14 

4 

18 
4 
8 

8 

10 

is 


1(1 

10 

10 
10 


10 
10 

10 

10 


2 

2 

2 

_ 

2 


24 
4 

28 
4 
8 

8 
20 

JS 


6 

2 

s 
2 

2 

8 


2 

2 
2 
2 

2 

2 


2 

2 

2 
~2 


4 
4 

4 
4 


5 

5 

5 
5 


2 

2 

2 

2 


11 
3 

14 
2 

5 

5 

9 
14 


5 
5 

2 

12 
2 
7 

3 
3 
4 

2 
3 

9 


18 

IS 

18 


2 

2 

2 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


2 
2 

2 

2 


i 

l 

1 

i 

i 


4 

4 
3 
3 

3 

1 
4 


14 
3 

17 
3 

3 

14 

17 


2 


2 


6 

1 




10 

10 
10 


2 


2 

2 


2 

4 
6 


2 
2 



108 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL UETJJ-R ^ — continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster's stores, received, issued, 





Class 3. — Artillery implements and 
equipments. 




8,2 

3 <8 
c > 
Cm C 
SO O 


S3 




id 

DO 


id 

>. 

% 


on 


T. _1 


L 


'£ r 




Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 


'Jl 

1 

3 
9 
s 

u 
c 

"c 
o 

C 

i 


■fi 

> 
o 
« 




ft 


3 
c 

11 


X 

'- 

o 

"3 
*i 


£ 


3 
"3 

be 

T 


3 

tx 

"3 

r. 

s 

3 


On hand in storehouse, June 1,1867 

In possession of Militia, June 1, 1867 

In possession of independent organizations and 


2 




10 

5 

2 


2 


4 


2 


12 


12 
4 


6 


■i 

3 


4 


819 

; 4 


4 
1 


8 6 

2 2 














1 
1 


2 

19 


2 


4 

4 
4 


2 

— 

H 


12 


1G 
4 
8 


6 














2 


11 __L 

16 2 2 

3 


4 23 


*M 


8 




6 4-1 


9 O 


Total to be accounted for by Militia 






5 




6 


-- 

..i 


2- 8 


5 




4 4 
































Total turned in, lost or destroyed 


ill 




f! 




4 


L 

2 


12 

5 


8 

8 
16 


1 


6 
1C 


i 

21 
22 


1. 

2 8 

1 

2 15 
42S 


5 

5 1 


4 4 








h 


2 
2 


11 
4 




In possession of independent organizations, &c. 

On hand in storehouse, June 1, 1868 

Total propjrty in possession of State 


1 


1 


i 

- 

< 

19 


6 4 
8 












STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



109 



ANNUAL BE TURN — continued, 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 



Class 
3. 


Class 4. — Small-arms. 


Class 7. — Accoutre- 
ments. 




5 


6 

ft 

cc' 

o 

1 




c/T 
o 

CO 

13 

2 

CD 

cp 


3c 

a> 
/. 

c 

cc' 

y 
« 

02 


cc 

CO 

co 
P 

© 

fcJO 
02 


co 

<o 

c3 
a 

P 
o 

"S) 

S 
M 


CO 

3 

CO 

>> 

a 

p 

o 

"So 
s 

£ 


2 

b 

0) 
P 

p 

M 


>> 

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3929 
1211 

180 


200 


500 




2 
96 

6 


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2 


8 


8 


49 


49 


3929 
1270 

180 


200 


200 


150 
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59 


59 

328 




14 32 

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338 






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907 


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89 

427 




























i 

1 


50 594 

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19 


5320 
208 
1419 

49 

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500 


101 


4168 
1212 
26 44 

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8 


i 


49 

49 

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49 


4!) 

49 

49 

49 


5379 
218 

1488 

49 
28 

77 

1411 


200 


200 


200 


32 


154 

48 
148 


1500 


_ 
3 


— 







96 







50 


111 





__ 


— 

















1111 


1^1 


















— 


















~ 

















50 


~ 


148 




s 


59 




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96 


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2 

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180 
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427 


*" 6 

2 
104 


11C 

10 6 
6 20 


2 
2 


8 
8 


s 
8 


49 
49 


49 
49 


180 
3760 
5351 









— 


6 

154 







50 


■ 






200 

200 


200 

'.'00 


150 

200 


.32 
32 


1500 


5 


594 


59 


200 


500 


4->7 


41 


;s 


1500 



110 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL RETURN — continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster's stores, received, issued, 





Class 7. — Accoutrements. 




Infantry. 










03 














Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 








"St 
















tc 


03 

'E. 




■2 

t/3 




DO 

o 


^ 


^ 


fit 






M 

1 

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2 


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03 


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12 




,£ £ 


- 


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& 




■§ 


c 


£ .22 


DO 


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PQ 








O 


£|£ 


> 


* $ 



I . I I 'I I I 

On hand in storehouse, June 1, 1867 6357 7392 5123 646 5457 2 6398 60 60 

In possession of Militia, June 1, 1867.:' 1-.69 1-.69 1270 1269 1208 46 1275 .... 

In possession of independent organizations andj 

public institutions, June 1, 1867 33ft 325' 314' 244 133 14 328 

Received as per abstract "A" 1 ' 45 

Received as per abstract " B " I 34 34: 39 34 34 ... . 



1500 



Total to be accounted for 7990 9020 6746 7793 6798 107 8035 60 60 1500 



Issued to Militia 

Total to be accounted for by Militia. 



250 1 250 250 250 201 21 250 ... . 250 
11519 1519 1520 15191409 67 1525.... 250 



110 



loo; 101 loo 

111 ill Hi 



49 3, 100 

18... 11'. 



Ill 112 111 67 3 111 

)9 1408 1408 1408 1342 64 1414 .... 250 



Turned in by Militia 

Lost or destroyed by Militia 

Total turned in, lost or destroyed 

In possession of Militia, June 1, 1868 

Issued to independent organizations, &c J 1 l j.. 

In possession of independent organizations, &c.j 36l| 359 353 278 133 14 362 

On hand in storehouse, June 1, 1868 6207 7242 4974 6096 5305 29 6248 60 60 1250 

Total property in possession of State J7980 9009 6735 7782 6780 107 8024 60 60 1 500 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



Ill 



ANNUAL EETUE N— continued. 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 











Class 7.— 


Appendages. 










Class 7 


— Horse 
ments. 


equip- 


Carbines. 


Muskets and rifles. 


Cavalry. 


u 

> 

'u 

•d 

i 


6 

T. 

"> 

be 

'u 
& 
DC 


S3 
c 
o 
■g 

-d 

9 

co 
u 

CD 

p 
? 

GO 
S 

W 


CO 
O 

Pi 

d 

9 

cd 

.C 
o 

o 

p 
p 

C3 

O 


CO 
CD 
.d 
O 
F5 
0> 

% 

c 

e8 

CO 
(H 

CD 
Vi 

V 

<s 
u 
o 
CO 


GO 

CD 

■o 

S3 
S3 
P 
CD 

u 

'$ 

Ed 

c 

cc3 
M 
CD 

S 
En 


GO 

CD 

c 


CD 

CD 
Fh 
eg 
P 

&o 


CO 

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_C 

P 
02 


GO 

CD 
t- 

CD 

co 

% 

PQ 


CO 

CD 

p 


GO 

bX) 

.5 
"C 
p 

CO 

a 
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H 
ce 

X 


GO 

be 
H 

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p 

co 

% 

CD 

CO 

X 


CO 

& 

CD 

u 

CD 
CO 

u 

CD 

S 

cS 
X 

H 


c 

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a 



3 

CD 
co" 


co 

& 
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O 

U 

3 
O 


2 

3 


GO 

03 
S-t 

CO 

d 

c« 

CD 

C3 

w 


CO 

CD 

CO 



CD 
CO 



H 


1 

CD 

GO 




200 


20 


200 


200 


4398 
1168 

180 


639 '4411 
1161140 


387 
117 

16 


389 
112 

6 


3892 
1171 

252 


1004 
251 

50 


765 
233 

40 


111 '3850 
183,1115 

55 122 


150 
50 


150 


150 

50 


150 

50 


150 


80 
16 










36 


210 


















































1 


















































200 


20 


200 200 

7777(7777 


5746 
249 


7915761 

22 228 


520 
23 


5(7 5315 

23 242 


13051038 3495088 

48 40 48 223 


200 
8 


150 ( 200; 200 150 
. ...1 ft! 8i~~" 


96 
~7« 






i 










...1... 


1417 


1381368 


140 


1351413 


299 273 231,1338 


58.... 58 58 


.... 


•^9 


















46 
63 


13 45 

9 72 


"21 


8 

7 


40 
80 


12 
25 


18 
33 


9 5 
10 170 


| 




































1 














... .... 


109 
1308 


22 117 
116.1251 


21 
119 


15 120 
120 1293 


37 51 19 175 
262 222 2121163 


........L....I.... 









— 


........ 


1 iimim _ mi 

58 1 ! HSl 58 ! ..._ 


^9 




















....!.... 












........ ....I....L... ....!....!...... 








i 




........ 

T 








1 ! ! 1 1 1 








....77: 


180 
4195 


36 210 


16 
364 
499 


6 

374 
500 


252 
3690 
5235 


50| 40! 55 : 192 


....L..L..L. ..!.... 




200 
200 


20 

:o 


200, 200 
200 200 


630, 

78 


4228 

5689 


\ 
968 

1280 


743 

1005 


72 
339 


3633 
49!8 


1 111" 

142 150 142| 142; 150 
200! 150' 200 j 200 150 


64 

96 



112 



ADJUTANT-GENERAI/S REPORT. 



ANNUAL RETURN— continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster f s stores, received, issued, 





Class 7. — Horse equipments. 




Cavalry. 


Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 


a 

u 

02 
V. 

3 

'$ 

05 
<D 

1 

co 


03 

<s 
"3d 

'3 
u 

to 


"eg 

of 

t 

1 

co 


6 

3 

<£ 

o 

3 

CO 


u 
log 

a 

e! 

ci 

03 

5 
a 

CO 


"3 
% 

~02 

<a 

c 
Q 


2? 

H 

OS 

S3 

93 
P 

! 

3 
5 


3 

i 

— 

1 


On hand in storehouse, June 1, 1867 150 

In possession of Militia, June 1, 18(57 | 50 

In possession of independent organizations and 


150 

50 


150 

50 


1000 
50 

200 


150 
50 


150 
50 


150 
50 


■• 




























S 
















900 


•-00 


900 


19.-.0 9oo -no 9oo 


3 












8 


8 


8| 82 8 8.... 








Total to be accounted for by Militia 


58 


58 


58 82| 58} 58 50 










... ! i 













....::;:. .|.. .:::..:::: 


















...J....L..I.... 






1 




58 58 58, 82| 58 58 ! 50 








. ..!..!....! ' ^ 






1 1 ! 1 










200 i I 


S 




i 








142 149 149 9fiS 14?! 149. 1S0 























Total property in possession of State. 



200 200| 200 1?50 200| 200 200 3 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



113 



ANNUAL RETURN — continued, 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 



Class 8. 
Ammunition. 


Class 10. 
Parts of articles. 


Materials. 






Ropes, thread, &c. 






"3 

B 


1-e 
u 


X 

O 

3 


a: 

B 
3 
bx 

CO 

o 

5 

e8 


c 

SX) 

3 
1 


fl 
o 
x 
•j. 

« 

co" 

-a 

c 


s 
be 

& 

a> 

o 


CO 


6 
§ 
xT 
•/. 

"3 

9 


Ironmongery. 


o 

<£ 

fcJD 

"B 

ee 
o 
-(J 

b 
<^ 

Ph 


3 

.5 

H 


| 

ct 
1 


X 




x 


X 

c? 

X 

C 
«6 

X 

o 


x' 

'2. 


c 

"x 
"3 

50 

3 


_x 


fi 

c 

x' 

r 


J. 

£ 

3 
o 

X 

5 


"5 


o$ 
.O 

ce 

05 

O 

02 
4> 
02 

C 

S3 


co 
jO 

a? 
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B 

<u 
o 
,B 
hi 

<D 

CO 

Sh 
O 

w 


02 

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o 

CO 

cS 

.a 

B 

o 


03 

o; 
s-i 
c 

X. 
X 

5 

1 


x" 

53 

C 
X 

c8 
x' 


© 

o 
/. 

CD 


X 
CO 

o 

u 

bo 

o 
o 

X? 
CO 

02 


3000 


17500 


10000 
1000 


14 
4 


4 


1 


1 


8 


1 


6 
2 


2 


5 


,3 


35 


2 


5 


12 


02 
62 

62 


4 


22 


7 * 


2 


300 


50 


200 


22 

22 

22 

22 


44 
14 

44 




1 








3000 


17500 


11000 


18 

4 
8 


4 


1 


1 


8 

s 
8 


1 

1 

1 


8 
2 
4 

4 

4 
8 


2 

2 
2 


5 

5 
5 


13 
13 


3|! 2 

I 


5 

5 
5 


12 

12 
12 


4 

1 


22 
22 


7» 

7| 


2 

2 


300 

300 
300 


50 

50 
50 


200 

200 
200 


1 






















1000 








































1000 


8 
















1 

1 


1 

1 












3000 


17500 


loooo 


10 
18 


4 
4 


3i 2 


n,! 


3000 


17500 


11000 


13 


3^ 


2 


4 


22 


44 


7.\- 


1 



114 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL EETUEN- continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster's stores, received, issued, 





Materials. 




Ironmongery. Leather, &c. 


Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 


x 

s 

3 
w 


03 

o 

o 

02 


2 

i ^ 

5 as Hr 

6 ti- 
cs = .E . x 

. fjMoh x 

s m 3 te « *t * ~ 
■". i i 1 1 * * s 
| s s 1 1| if 1 1 

H p p p p p 3 w 


— 
c 

* X 


1 

3 x 

- Eh 




5 


5 


3 20 2 4 


14 « 7 3 i 


2 23 


1 44 






In possession of independent organizations and 
























































5 


5 


3 20 2 4 


4 8 7 3 | 


223 


4+4 








1 














- 


_ 






















1 














1 















r 












. .. *..r 










| 




1 






















i 










Issued to independent organizations, &c 














1 ! i 








5 

5 


5, 
5' 




r 










3 20 2 4 
3 20 2 4 


1 8 7 3 | 

1 8 7 3 A 


2 23 


}44 


Total property in possession of State 


2 23 


J 44 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



115 



ANNUAL KE TU EN — continued, 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 



Materials. 
















Tools. 


Paints, oils, 
&c. 




*31 

3 

S- 
Ti 

o 
oT 

< 


DO 


30 

1 
< 


o 

p 
31 

B 

if. 

3 

< 


X 

o 

3 

- 
it 

< 


Awls. 


Axes. 


3 

d 
2q 


c 

r: 

o 
u 


o 
c 

31 

c§ 

31 

o 
cS 

- 

X 


53 
c 

X 

= 

X 

i' 

31 
U 


S 

X 
X 

3 

X 

X 




ri 

3 
.-: 

X 


X 

3 



p 






o 
s. 

o 


3c 

3 

O 


M 
ft 

I 


a? 

"3 

1 


1 


Boxes. 


x 

s 

3 
ft 
a. 

31 

11 

K 

o 


ft 

to 

o 

o 


as 

So 

X 

if 

o 


05 

c 
o 


c 

X 

X 

3 

< 


3 

X 

"x 

3 
3 


- 
o 

03 
03 

<! 


3 

c 

X 
X 

3" 

X 

_x 

% 

< 


u 

X 

3 


c 
u 

< 


c 

3 


31 




03 

i 

o 


3 
| 

OS 


a 

oj 
;- 
c 

a 

o 

be 
- 
> 

x 

5 


.5 

sS 
ft 

of 
<D 

O 

M 


3 

03 

3 
o 


1 
1 


4 

4 


1 


5 

5 


50 
50 


1 

1 


6 

6 


9 

9 


66 

100 

19 
4 

189 
56 
156 


5 

5 


i 

1 


2 
2 


9 

2 

■ 

•• 
!•■ 


1 

] 

1 

11 


1 
1 

1 

1 


2 
2 

2 


3 
3 

2 


3 
3 


1 

1 

•• 

•'• 
L 

i — 

"L 


12 

ii 

12 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 
1 


9 
2 

•• 

» 
i 

11 

F 

• 
■ 


1 

1 


1 
1 


24 

24 


8 
8 


4 

4 


1 

:: 
i 


1 

1 

1 
1 


1 

1 




4 
4 


5 








( 
6 


! 




156 

19 
14 

189 


5 
5 


- 

1 




1 
1 


50 


1 

1 


2 

1 


9 

s 


1 

h 


\ i 

5 1 1 


i 12 
12 


1 
1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


n 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2- 
2' 


8 


I 1 


i 
1 


1 
1 



116 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



ANNUAL RETURN — continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster 's stores, received, issued, 





Tools. 




U 

5 


ce 

ci 
aa 

u 
o 

O 


Chisels. 


- 

5 


DC 

be 
O 


DC 


on 


1 

DC 


J. 

— 
— 




Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 


7- 

c 


MP 

5 o 


7. 

fci 

sc 

■j. 

t 


X 


Cm 
O 
f. 

- 
as 

1 

f. 
© 


On han 1 in storehouse, June 1, 18G7 


l 


24 


2 


2 


2 


'1 


2 


l 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


In possession of independent organizations and 




























































































l 


24 


2 


2 


9 


~o 


9 


11 


1 


-- 


1 


1 












_ 


~r 






Total to be accounted for by Militia 
























• 




ill 






















































— 


" 


— 


— 









— 


— 


| 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


Issued to independent organizations, &c 

In possession of independent organizations, &c. 


l 

l 


.... 

24 

~2l 


2 
2 


2 
2 


_l_ 
9 . 


9 


1 


1 


l 


1 


1 


" 

1 


1 


Total propei'tv in possession of State 


2 


h 


2 


l 


1 


1 
ll 


i 


1 


1 


i 






STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



117 



ANNUAL RETURN— continued,.. 

and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 

Tools. 



Files. 


X 

"2 


to 

3 
43 

5c 

3 
O 


?. 

K 

A 

Z 


M 

1 


3 

5 
c 

5 

'Us 

c 

X 

5 


Hammers. 


"E 


CD 
CO 

u 

X 

% 
t"2 


iX 

3 

05 

o 


IS 


*cg 
a 

X 
X 

6 

X 

o 


Knives. 


c 

5 

© 

z 


X 


Z 

X 

z 
5 

x" 

03 


% 

a 
« 

'3 


03 

O 
co 
x 

«S 

xT 

^03 

13 


X 

03 

c 

c 




t5 

a> 

u 
o 

1 

1 

to 

• 03 
g 


<£. 

PI 

03 


> 

a 

X 


"x 

E 

X 

56 

03 

s 
s 

w 


&J0 

'3 

s 
a 

3 


Z 

S 

3 


fee 

~7. 

■/. 

Z 

3 
z 


03 

5 

X 

s 

3 


*x 

X 

x' 

03 


x 

_i 

In 


3 

X 


r.' 

'5 

M 


03 

"x 
x' 

-2 


"x 


-x 


13 

3 

o 

3 


26 
26 


12 
12 


1 

1 


1 
1 

7 
■ 


V. 
12 

12 

12 


1 
1 

77 
77 

.. 

i 
i 


i 

i 

77 
77 

i 
! 


1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 
1 


i 

i 

i 
i 


2 

2 
2 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 

l 

1 

l 


1 

1 

77 

z_ 

77 

i 

i 


1 

1 

1 

1 


l 
l 

l 
l 


1 

1 

1 
1 


3 
3 

3 
3 


4 

: 

4 

1 


2 

2 

2 


1 

1 

1 
1 


1 

1 

1 
1 


o 

3 


1 
1 


l 
l 

i 
l 


4 
4 

4 
1 


3 
3 

.. 


1 
1 

77 


1 
1 


100 
100 

100 
100 


2 
2 


8 
2 

10 
2 
4 


p.... 

El- 
El... 


■•I- 

... 


HZ 


4 


26 
26 


12 
12 


i 

i 


1 

1 


i 

3 


1 
1 


3 
3 


1 

i 


1 

~1 


6 

10 









118 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL RETURN— continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster 's stores, received, issued, 





Tools. 


p 


lanes Pin< 


;'rs 


Punches. 


x~ 




Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 18G8. 


si 

■i. 


m a . 

s ■ s> * 
_ '3 -g 9 £ 

x - 3 "x '- 

g » 7. /: = 


f 


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vT X X X 




* 




1 1 


2 1 


111 


1 1 1 


1 1 


1 2 


1 


2 






In possession of independent organizations and 






















































Total to be accounted for 


1 1 


2 1 


111 


1 1 1 


1 1 


1 2 


1 


] 









































— 




























— — 






- 


~ 































r 









~~ 


























1 1 1 
1 1 1 


1 1 


1 ' 1 






1 1 

ill 


2 1 

111 


1 1 1 

1 11 1 


9, 


Total property in possession of State 


1 2 


1 


2 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



119 



ANNUAL RETURN — continued, 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 



Tools. 


Clothing. 




CD 

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X 

xi 

K 
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Saws. 


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X 


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1 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 


2 


1 


1 
1 

1 


2 
2 

2 


1 
1 

1 


4 

4 

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4 


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4 

4 


4 
4 

4 


2 

2 

— 1 
111 

2 


1 

1 

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1 


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1 

1 

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2 

6 

2 
4 

4 

2 
6 


1 
1 

1 
1 


6 

(i 

6 
6 


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1 

1 


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1 

1 


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1 

1 


4 

4 


4 
4 


3 
3 


3 
3 


1 

1 


1 

1 


2 

2 


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1 


90 
1164 

'250 

1504 
295 
1459 

45 

15 

60 


99 








1155 

'250 

1504 
253 

1408 

37 
36 

73 


96 

*24 

120 
22 
118 

2 

5 

7 


1037 
'350 


2 


2 


1 
1 


1387 

294 

1331 

36 
25 

61 










1399 


1335 


111 


1270 




4 

4 


4 
4 


3 
3 


3 
3 


1 
1 


1 

1 


2 

2 


1 
1 


80 
1489 


133 

1468 


1^1 


_ 


2 


4 
115 


92 


2 


1 


I 


2 


1 


i! 


2 


1 


4 


4 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1362 



120 



adjutant-general's report. 



ANNUAL RETURN — continued. 
Of ordnance, ordnance and quartermaster 's stores, received, issued, 





Clothing, camp and garrison 
equipage. 


Disposition of Ordnance Stores, June 1, 1868. 


03 

% 

e3 

Q 


to 

CD 

3 


03 

3 


3 
o 

03 

03 

o 


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x — 

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x — 


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of 














1286 


..49 
..26 


i 
11 10 29 




1114 


833 


763 


64 


50 


27 28 27 


In possession of independent organizations and 


8 8 

| 


8 




300 


550 


900 


50 


50 


200 


10.. 
























40 75 


.... 






14141383 
196 194 


1663 114 
231 1 50 


100 


1558 


46 46 64 




252 14 S 
1538 14 31 

32.. 1 


10 6 20 


Total to be accounted for by Militia 


1310 


1027 

47 
95 


994 114 50 

rzbrfc 


37 34 47 

"ifTfi 




81 


96 1 ... 


1..L. 






1 




81 
1 29 


14-2 

885 


96! 1 


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1500 14 3C 

! 


2 1 




1 

898 113 


50 


35 33 46 




— 


8 


In possession of independent organizations, &c 












8 - 
















104 


403 


669.... 


50 


26 26 4^ 


2 510 






Total property in possession of State 


I333J12N8 


15671 us! ion 


1526 40 71 


45 46 64 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



121 



ANNUAL EETUE N — concluded, 
and remaining on hand during the year ending June 1, 1868. 

Clothing, camp and garrison equipage. 



w 

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100 














3 


3 


2 
23 

1 

10 
5 


2 

24 

1 


6 
24 

1 


3 

22 

2 

10 

1 


50 
54 


268 
115 






8 


100 


54 
112 


50 


54 
162 


2 
4 






















































3450 


100 


300 
300 


100 
100 


30 

30 


.to 


2 


2 






1010 






250 


250 














1 






















1 
























3450 


00 


2 
2 
2 


2 
2 

2 


3 


3 


41 
4 


37 
4 


41 
4 


3S 
7 


104 

8 


383 
12 


250 
102 


250 
107 


8 


100 


166 
50 


50 


•216 
50 


7 
2 


1 
1 




— 





— 


— 


— 










27 


?8?8 


29 


62 


127 


102 


107 






162 


50 


212 

63 
1 


6 

2 


1 


























1 
1 


i 

i 


1 


i 


4 
4 


5 
12 










62 
2 


















































1 


1 


8 


17 










64 




6 


2 














































2 


2 






2f> 


27 


27 


28 


54 


110 


102 


107 






98 


50 


148 


4 


1 
























1 


1 


1 
























































- 


— 





- 




1 
2 
























7 
8 
41 


2 

7 

30 


2 

12 
41 


3 
6 

37 












3450 


100 


300 


100 


30 


90 


— 


— 


3 


3 
3 


46 


261 


148 


143 


8 


100 


66 


— 


67 





3450 


100 


300 


100 


30 


90 


2 


2 


3 


100 


371 


250 


250 


8 


100 


164 


-,l 


215 


7 


1 









122 



CONCLUSION. 

Since I have had charge of the affairs of this department, 
I have studied with great care the pecuniary interests of 
the State, and have economized as far as possible' in all 
expenses connected with our militia system and this office. 
Where a dollar could be saved to the State, I have taken 
no less pains to save it than I should were it a personal 
rather than a public transaction. In the purchase of mili- 
tary equipments, I have not only corresponded with various 
parties, but have visited them and made careful and per- 
sonal inquiries at my own expense. I have spent days with 
parties in Boston and other places in examining the quality 
and prices of articles required by law to be purchased, pay- 
ing my own fare and expenses. But I do not speak of this 
matter as in any way grumbling, but to prove that, in all my 
transactions with and for the State, I labor to make the 
expense as small as possible. During the past year I have 
saved to the State one thousand dollars in postage, which 
is referred to under the head of " Testimonials." This has 
put me to no little trouble and personal expense ; but, while 
I am a servant of the people, or have in my care, so far 
as the duties of my office go, their interest and protection, 
I shall deem it not only a pleasure, but a solemn duty, to 
manage the affairs of this department with the strictest 
economy, and for their good, to the best of my ability. 

And in this connection I am happy to say that, during 
the year, there has been obtained from the General Govern- 
ment, through the persistent efforts of Col. C. H. Roberts, 
our efficient State agent, the sum of seventeen hundred 
dollars on account of office expenses incurred by this depart- 
ment on account of the late war, the payment of which 
depended upon the vouchers and certificates furnished by 
this office. 

The amount thus far obtained from the General Govern- 
ment, on account of office expenses incurred by this depart- 
ment in raising, organizing, and mustering out of troops, is 
eight thousand four hundred thirteen dollars and three 
cents. 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 123 

Of the two thousand four hundred and fifty-four dollars 
and sixty-nine cents, shown in the Report of the State 
Treasurer as having been expended by this department for 
clerk-hire during the past year, five hundred accrued prior 
to 1867 in obtaining back records, and three hundred and 
thirty-nine dollars and ninety-nine cents has been paid for 
filling out soldiers' testimonials ; thus reducing the current 
expense of the office for the past year, for clerk-hire, to 
one thousand six hundred and fourteen dollars and seventy 
cents, which, deducted from the amount recovered from the 
General Government on the strength of evidence furnished 
by the office during the year, leaves a balance of eighty- 
five dollars and thirty cents saved to the State ; thus mak- 
ing the office a paying institution rather than one of 
expense. 

In relation to the expense of the militia for the past 
year, as shown by the Treasurer's Report, justice demands 
that I make a brief explanation. 

The entire amount paid to the volunteer militia for ser- 
vices rendered at May inspection, fall drill and encamp- 
ment, for rent of armories and for miscellaneous expenses, 
is $19,035.17, as will be seen by deducting, from the sum 
total (124,003.15), the $1,967.98 paid for military equip- 
ments. These equipments are now on hand, and, so long 
as kept in use, will remain in good condition, and the 
expense of the same will not again have to be made. Then, 
again, the expense of transportation to and from encamp- 
ment is full one half of the amount paid for the several 
drills, encampments, and armory rents ; which, as the 
law now stands, can be saved hereafter, as, instead of 
mileage being allowed, transportation is to be furnished by 
the Quartermaster-General ; and I am confident that it can 
be done with little or no expense to the State, so that the 
entire expense of the militia for the ensuing year need not 
exceed $15,000, even though the additional pay recom- 
mended be allowed by the present Legislature, as in all 
conscience sake it should. 

In Massachusetts there has been paid for compensation 



124 adjutant-general's report. 

of the militia, during the past year, over $121,000.00 ; for 
rent of armories, $25,275.45 ; and for other military ex- 
penses, $37,373.22,— making a total of $183,648.67, aside 
from the militia bounty of over $80,000.00; which, when 
compared with similar expenses of our own State, must, I 
think, convince all that the cost of the militia of New- 
Hampshire is at a remarkably low figure. It is true that 
Massachusetts is a more wealthy and enterprising State 
than ours, and that we cannot expect to maintain such an 
extensive militia ; but I do think that, when ours are com- 
pared witli the expenses of any other State, no one has 
reason to complain. 

As I remarked in the early part of this Report, the duties 
of the office during the past year have been onerous, much 
more so than I anticipated ; and, although my clerks have 
labored persistently, it has been found absolutely necessary 
that they should work evenings, and, with but very few ex- 
ceptions, have been in the office until late in the evening, 
and oftentimes until midnight, and this, too, without extra 
compensation, and without grumbling. 

The correspondence of the office has been so heavy that 
much important work has, of necessity, been neglected, 
and even now some seventy-five letters are on my desk 
awaiting replies, which, owing to the pressure of other 
office business, have accumulated during the last week. 
On the information asked for in these letters depends up- 
wards of two thousand dollars for bounty, back pay, and 
pension, and 1 hope in a few days to be able to answer 
them. 

The books containing the description and full history of 
our volunteers, having been in daily and constant use for 
seven years, are rapidly assuming a sad and alarmingly 
worn appearance ; and, unless they are copied, the records 
of many will soon be obliterated. 

The necessity of immediately opening a new set of books 
is imperative ; and I purpose to do so, as the clerks now in 
the office are conversant with the many complications, and 
they alone are competent to perform the task, as to their 



STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 125 

care has been left the duty of transferring the information 
and data received to the books ; and, owing to the style and 
inadaptation of those first started, one must be perfectly 
familiar with them, or else he could not decipher them. 

With this Report I conclude the military history of our 
State from 1623 to the present date ; and for the many fa- 
vors received at the hands of the people, and especially 
from the officers and soldiers of the late war, I desire to 
express my sincere thanks. 

While I have had charge of this important department 
of our State government, my intercourse with the rank 
and file of our brave volunteers has been of the most 
pleasant nature, and all have generously aided me in my 
work. I am aware that some of the calls made upon them 
occasioned a great amount of labor ; but I am happy to 
know that while, at the time, these calls were deemed hard, 
all now see their importance, and feel grateful for the privi- 
lege of aiding me in making up a correct record of the 
noble part taken by this State in the war of the rebellion. 

The services rendered and the sacrifices made by them 
entitle them to the grateful remembrance of our people, 
and no act of appreciation should be left undone. I have 
ever labored to promote their interest ; and, if I have been 
instrumental in doing them justice, and of placing upon 
record the tale of their noble deeds, I shall be amply re- 
paid for my endeavors. 

In closing, allow me to tender to your Excellency my 
grateful acknowledgments for the confidence you have at 
all times reposed in me, and for the kind and courteous 
treatment I have received at your hands. 

I would also express to Lieut. John M. Haines, my chief 
clerk, my obligations and thanks for the earnestness and 
interest he has ever shown in aiding me to perfect and 
complete the record of our brave soldiery, and for the 
faithfulness and intelligence with which he has discharged 
lis every duty. He entered the service early in 1861, 
shared the hardships and glory of the Third Regiment 
Sew-Hampshire Volunteers for three years ; was mus- 






126 adjutant-general's report. 

tered out with his regiment, August 23, 1864, and at once 
entered this office as clerk, since which time he has la- 
bored with untiring zeal for the good of the soldier and our 
people at large. 

And to Mr. Charles G. Remick, too, my acknowledg- 
ments are due for the faithful manner in which he has dis- 
charged his duties since he has been connected with the 
office. 

Hoping this Report, and the conclusion of our military 
history herewith published, may meet with your approba- 
tion and that of the public, 

I have the honor to remain, with high regard, 
Your obedient servant, 

NATT HEAD, 
Adjutant, Inspector, and Quartermaster General. 



PART SECOND. 



MILITARY HISTORY 



OF 



NEW-HAMPSHIRE, 



ITS SETTLEMENT IN 1623, 



THE YEAR 1861 



CONCLUDED 



IILITAEY HISTOKY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE: 

WAR OF 1812-1815. 



A series of aggressions on the part of England, long 
continued, without apology or redress, convinced the Amer- 
ican government of her hostile intentions, and led it to 
make preparations for the coming conflict. An extra ses- 
sion of Congress was called in November, 1811, by Presi- 
dent Madison, who laid before them by message the state 
of our foreign relations, and recommended preparation for 
war. The Congress, of like opinion with the President, 
enacted laws augmenting the navy, increasing the regular 
army, accepting the service of volunteers, detaching the 
State militia, and . in other ways increasing the national 
defenses. At length, in the early part of 1812, insults 
having been added to injuries, by the assumed mistress of 
the ocean, the American Congress, convinced that there was 
no hope of a change of policy on the part of that haughty 
power, and that a resort to arms was the only alternative 
for maintaining our rights, sustaining the national honor, 
and protecting our citizens, on the 18th day of June of that 
year, passed an act declaring war against Great Britain. 

Meantime, in anticipation of this result, active prepa- 
rations for war had been carried on by our government. 
President Madison made requisition upon the government 
of New Hampshire for its quota of militia to be detached, 
under act of Congress of April 10, 1812 ; and His Excellency, 
John Langdon,* the Governor, issued General Orders under 

*For notice of Gov. Langdon, see Report of 1866, Vol. II., page 333. 



6 adjutant-general's report. 

date of May 29, 1812, for detaching three thousand five 
hundred men from the militia of this State, and organizing 
them into companies, battalions, and regiments, the same 
to be armed and equipped for actual service, and in readi- 
ness to march at the shortest notice. The draft was made, 
and the companies, battalions, and regiments duly organ- 
ized ; but it being so near the close of Governor Langdon's 
term of office, he left the completion of the organization of 
the detached militia to his successor, His Excellency Gov- 
ernor Plumer,* who entered upon the duties of his office 
on Thursday, the 5th day of June, 1812. 

The declaration of war found the militia of New-Hamp- 
shire in a flourishing condition, as much so as at any period 
of its existence. The Governor, who from his position is 
Commander-in-chief of the militia, though not a military 
man, was one of energy, patriotism, method, and great ex- 
ecutive ability. His heart and hand were in the cause. 
His predecessors in that important office, without an excep- 
tion under the present Constitution, had been men engaged 
in the Revolutionary struggle, and had learned by experi- 
ence the worth of a well regulated militia, carried out the 
maxim of " in time of peace prepare for war," and did not 
believe in the more modern idea that "the militia system 
was a nuisance, and tended to demoralize the people. " 

* William Plumer was a resident of Epping. He was a native of Newbury. Mass., 
where he was born June 25, 1759. He was a descendant of Francis Plumer, of Boston 
in 1634, who removed to Newbury and resided there till his death. His father, Samuel 
Plumer, married Mary Dole in 1755. William Plumer moved to Epping in 1768, where 
he ever after resided. He was a lawyer by profession, and most successful in its prac- 
tice, early gaining a competency which enabled him to gratify his ambition for political 
life, and his taste for literature. He had received only an education at our common 
schools, yet few of his day had a better knowledge of English literature, or could write 
with more ease or force upon subjects that engrossed his mind. He often represented 
his adopted town in the Legislature, was a member of the Convention that framed the 
Constitution of our State, was Senator, and President of the same in 1810, was elected 
Governor of the State in convention of both branches of the Legislature in 1812, was 
succeeded by John Taylor Gilman in 1813, was re-elected Governor in 1816, 1817. and 
1818, declined a re-election in 1819, and retired to private life. In 1820 he was a Presi- 
dential Elector. This was his last public office. For near thirty years, subsequently, 
he enjoyed the pursuits of literature at his residence in Epping, and died December 23, 
1850, aged 91 years. Governor Plumer, in addition to his other qualifications, was a 
man of method and statistics, and with his administration of 1816. commenced method 
in our State records, particularly with those pertaining to the militia. The records of 
the Adjutant-General's Office commence with 1816, and, without a doubt, atthe sugges- 
tion of Governor Plumer. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 7 

The Adjutant-General was a soldier of the Revolution, and 
had been in that position since the adoption of the Consti- 
tution, and many of the officers of the militia had been his 
comrades in arms in that great struggle. Such men, taught 
in the school of experience, brought military skill and 
pride, without which skill is of little avail, to the organiza- 
tion and completion of our military system. Such being 
the situation of our militia, compliance with the requisi- 
tions of the General Government was met with the great- 
est promptness. 

The military organization of the State for 1812 was as 
follows : 

His Excellency, William Plumer, Captain-General and 
Commander-in-Chief. 

srA y ^n AidstoHi8Exceiie ^- 

' Timothy Upham was of Portsmouth. He was the son of Rev. Timothy Upham, 
of Deerfield, where he was born in the year 1783. His mother was Hannah, the daugh- 
ter of Rev. Nathaniel Gookin, of North Hampton. Timothy Upham moved to Ports- 
mouth in 1807, and opened a store in Market street. In June, 1811, he was appointed, 
by Governor Langdon, one of his aids, with rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He continued 
in business as a merchant until 1812, when, in anticipation of a war with Great 
Britain, he was commissioned a Major in the United States service in March of that 
year. In June following he was appointed to command the detachment of troops 
from New-Hampshire ordered to garrison Fort McClary, by Governor Plumer. In 
July he was commissioned as Major of the 11th U. S. Infantry. In September he 
joined his regiment at Plattsburg, N. Y. January 15, 1813, he was ordered to Portland 
as superintendent of the recruiting district of Maine. In the spring he joined his 
regiment, and was detailed to command a battalion which was to join Gen. Hampton's 
army preparing to attack Montreal. On this futile expedition, Major (now Lieutenant- 
Colonel) Upham fought his battalion with credit at Chrysler's Field. Just before this 
expedition he had been promoted to the Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the 21st Regiment. On 
the 14th of September, 1814, he was in command of his regiment at the " sortie of Fort 
Erie," and did gallant service with his regiment, in going to the rescue, by special 
order of Gen. Brown, of its former gallant commander, General Miller. At the close 
of this campaign, with impaired health, Col. Upham was ordered upon recruiting 
service. At the close of the war he resigned his commission, and in 1816 was appointed 
Collector of Customs at Portsmouth, and continued in that office for thirteen years. In 
1819, May 15, he was appointed Brigadier-General of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division New- 
Hampshire Militia, and was promoted to Major-General of the Division May 19, 1820, 
upon the resignation of General Clement Storer. This office he resigned May 13, 1823. 
After leaving the Custom-House in 1829, he again entered upon commercial pursuits, 
and in 1841 was appointed Navy Agent at Portsmouth by President Harrison. He 
soon resigned this office, and in 1845 removed to Charlestown, Mass., following his 
business of a merchant in Boston. Here his success did not meet his anticipations, 
and, impaired in health, he retired from active business. He died at Charlestown, 
November 2, 1855, in the 72d year of his age. 

t John A. Harper was of Meredith, and a lawyer by profession. He was Major of 
the 2d Battalion of the 29th Regiment in 1809-10, Lieutenant-Colonel of the same 
1811-1814, aid to Gov. Langdon in 1811, aid to Gov. Plumer 1812, and Representative 
to Congress in 1812 and 1813. 



MAJOR-GENERALS. 

Henry Butler, 1st Division. 
Samuel Hale, 2d Division. 
Philemon Whitcomb, 3d Division. 

Simeon Polsom, j Aidg fa Qeneral Butler _ 

George C. (Jopp, J 

Joseph TOton,' \ Aids to General Hale - 
Jo 1 S i iah 1 Wilklt COmb ' Jr " ! Aids t0 General Whitcomb - 



BRIG ADIER-GENER ALS . 

Clement Storer, 1st Brigade. 
Kichard Furber,* 2d Brigade. 
Asa Robinson, 3d Brigade. 
John Steele, 4th Brigade. 
Elisha Huntly, 5th Brigade. 
Moody Bedel, 6th Brigade. 

Michael McClary,f Adjutant-General, with the rank of 
Brigadier-General . 

Samuel Dinsmore,J Quartermaster-General, with the rank 
of Brigadier-General. 

* Gen. Richard Furber was of Farmington. He was born in jSewington, September 
20, 1753, and moved with his father's family, to that part of Rochester now Farming- 
ton, in 1762. In 1777 he enlisted as a soldier in the War of the Revolution, and served 
two years. He then returned home, and bought a piece of wild land hi Rochester, 
which he cleared, and brought into a well cultivated farm. He early had a command 
in the Militia. Under the present Constitution, he was Major of the 2d Battalion in 
the 2d Regiment of Militia in 1796, Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant in 1800. and 
Brigadier-General of the 2d Brigade from 1806 to September 21, 1818, when he resigned. 
He died March 13, 1848, in the 95th year of his age. 

t For notice of Gen. McClary, see Report for 1866, Vol. II., page 382. 

J Gen. Samuel Dinsmore was from Keene. He was born in Windham, July 1, 1766, 
and graduated at Harvard College in the class of 1789. Admitted to the bar, he set- 
tled in Keene, where he practiced his profession for the greater part of his life. In 
1808 he represented Keene in the Legislature. In 1808 and 1809 he was Major of the 
2d Battalion of the 20th Regiment of New Hampshire Militia. June 7, 1809, he vras 
appointed Commissary-General, with the rank of Brigadier-General, which office he re- 
signed December 7, 1816. He was a Representative in Congress in 1811 and 1812, and 
cast his vote for the declaration of war against Great Britain. Retiring from Congress, 
he devoted himself to his profession. In 1821 he was chosen to the Council of the 
State, and served one year. In 1823 he was appointed Judge of Probate for Cheshire 
County, and continued in that office until 1831, when he resigned. In 1825 he was 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 
BRIGADE-INSPECTORS, WITH THE RANK OF MAJOR. 

Edward J. Long, 1st Brigade. 
Andrew Wentworth, 2d Brigade. 
William Graves, 3d Brigade. 
Seth King, 4th Brigade. 
Eben Carpenter, 5th Brigade. 
Jeduthan Wilcox, 6th Brigade. 

BRIGADE-QUARTERMASTERS, WITH THE RANK OF MAJOR. 

Thomas Folsom, 1st Brigade. 

, 2d Brigade. 

Jonathan Piper, 3d Brigade. 
Stephen P. Steele, 4th Brigade. 

, 5th Brigade. 

, 6th Brigade. 



REGIMENTS. 

1. Gideon Walker, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Samuel Larkin, Major 1st Battalion. 
Joseph Browne, Major 2d Battalion. 

2. Joshua Allen, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Daniel Henderson, Major 1st Battalion. 
Samuel Allen, Major 2d Battalion. 

3. Thomas Lovering, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
John Dearbon, Major 1st Battalion. 
Merrill Flanders, Major 2d Battalion. 

4. Richard Hilton, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Joseph Peas, Major 1st Battalion. 
Daniel Coffin, Major 2d Battalion. 

5. Josiah Osgood, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
David McGregore Means, Major 1st Battalion. 
Eli Sawtel, Major 2d Battalion. 

appointed a Commissioner upon the boundary line between New Hampshire and Mas- 
achusetts, which was surveyed and established in August of that year. In 1831 he 
vsls elected Governor of the State, and was annually re-elected the two following 

years. Affable in his manners, of the most unexceptional habits in his private life, 

md assiduous in the performance of his public duties, few men in our State have held 
ublic office more acceptably to the people than Gen. Dinsmore. He died at Keene, 

March 15, 1835, in the 69th year of his age. 



10 adjutant-general's report. 

6. Ezra Parker, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
John Cass, Jr., Major 1st Battalion. 
Josiah Hastings, Major 2d Battalion. 

7. Jonathan Little, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
, Major 1st Battalion. 



John Bassett, Major 2d Battalion. 

8. John Miltimore, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Stephen Reynolds, Major 1st Battalion. 
Samuel M. Richardson, Major 2d Battalion. 

9. Robert Holmes, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
John Stinson, Major 1st Battalion. 
Benjamin Woodbury, Major 2d Battalion. 

10. Dudley Prescott, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
David Sanborn, Major 1st Battalion. 
John Nutter, Major 2d Battalion. 

11. Samuel Cofran, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
David Norris, Major 1st Battalion. 

Asa Foster, Jr., Major 2d Battalion. 

12. William Farrar, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Oliver Prescott, Major 1st Battalion. 
Bethuel Harris, Major 2d Battalion. 

13. John Montgomery, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
John Kimball, Major 1st Battalion. 

Daniel Patch, Major 2d Battalion. 

14. John B. Southmayd, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Jonathan Bloget, Jr., Major 1st Battalion. 
Enoch Colby, Jr., Major 2d Battalion. 

15. Timothy W. Hale, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Isaac Chapman, Major 1st Battalion. 
Lebbeus Chase, Major 2d Battalion. 

16. Oliver Hastings, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Jonathan Baker, Major 1st Battalion. 
Ebenezer Grout, Major 2d Battalion. 

17. Theophilus Lovering, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Henry Sweetser, Major 1st Battalion. 

Henry T. Eaton, Major 2d Battalion. 

18. Benjamin Butler, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Isaac Shepard, Major, 1st Battalion. 
Samuel Sherburn, Major 2d Battalion. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 11 

19. Daniel Hoit * Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Charles Little, Major 1st Battalion. 
Joseph Gilman, Major 2d Battalion. 

20. Job F. Brooks, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Nathaniel Fisk, Major 1st Battalion. 
William M. Bond, Major 2d Battalion. 

21. Isaac Chandler, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Benning Smart, Major 1st Battalion. 
Jonathan Weare, Jr., Major 2d Battalion. 

22. Abiel Wilson, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Abijah Elliot, Major 1st Battalion. 
John Steele, Major 2d Battalion. 

23. Amos A. Brewster, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Joel Joslin, Major 1st Battalion. 
Jonathan Durkee, Major 2d Battalion. 

24. Stephen Wilson, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Sylvanus Chesman, Major 1st Battalion. 
Jeremiah Eames, Jr., Major 2d Battalion. 

25. Isaac Waldron, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Daniel Smith, Major 1st Battalion. 
John Blake, Major 2d Battalion 

26. David McClure, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 

, Major 1st Battalion. 

Peter Peavy, Major 2d Battalion. 

27. Samuel Quarles, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Dudley Harvey, Major 1st Battalion. 
John Leavitt, Major 2d Battalion. 

28. Cyrus Kingsbury, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Charles Webster, Major 1st Battalion, 
Henry Train, Major 2d Battalion. 



Daniel Hoit was of Sandwich, the son of Stephen Hoit, a Lieutenant in Capt. Bald- 
win's Company of Stark's regiment in the battle of Bunker Hill. He was born in 
. He early entered upon military life. He was Lt. Colonel of the 19th regiment 
rom 1810 to 1817, Colonel of the same in 1818 and 1819, and Brigadier-General of the 
id Brigade in 1820, 21 and 22, when he resigned. He represented the town of Sandwich 
or several years, beginning with 1811, and again in 1830 and 1835. He was the Senator 
rom the 6th District in 1828, and Councilor of the 2d Councilor District in 1825 and 
826. He was a farmer and merchant, and the father of Albert G. Hoit, a noted por- 
rait painter who died in Boston some few years since. Gen. Hoit died at Sandwich, 
August 11, 1859, aged 81 years. 



12 

29. John A. Harper, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Stephen Gale, Major 1st Battalion. 
Samuel Lawrence, Major 2d Battalion. 

30. Eliphalet Gay, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Joshua Eaton, Major 1st Battalion. 
Philip S. Harvey, Major 2d Battalion. 

31. John Quimby, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Samuel Rogers, Major 1st Battalion. 
Abijah Powers, Major 2d Battalion. 

32. Aaron Hibbard, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Buckminster Drury, Major 1st Battalion. 
James Hutchins, Major 2d Battalion. 

33. Stephen Berry, Jr., Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
John Plummer, Major 1st Battalion. 
Joshua G. Hall, Major 2d Battalion. 

34. Robert McMurphy, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Ebenezer Kimball, Major 1st Battalion. 
, Major 2d Battalion. 

35. Thomas Goss, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Amos S. Parsons, Major 1st Battalion. 
Joseph Hoit, Major 2d Battalion. 

36. Stephen Dinsmore, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Samuel Stark, Major 1st Battalion. 

Silas Meserve, Major 2d Battalion. 

37. Caleb Seabury, Lieut. Col. Commandant. 
Levi George, Major 1st Battalion. 
Benjamin Choate, Major 2d Battalion. 

Thus it will be seen that only one additional regiment 
had been formed since 1808, and in fact there had been 
very little alteration in the militia lasvs from that time. 

Soon after the declaration of war, the President ordered 
the Secretary of War to request Governor Plumer to or- 
der into the service of the United States, upon requisition 
of Gen. Dearborn,* such part of the quota of the militia of 
this state, detached under the act of Congress of April 10, 
1812, as he should deem necessary for the defense of the 
sea-coast of New Hampshire. 

*For notice of Gen. Dearborn, see Report of 1S66, Vol. II.. 362. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 13 

This order was made upon the representations of Gov- 
ernor Plumer and other prominent individuals from this 
State, that our sea-board and the public works in the har- 
bor of Piscataqua were in a defenseless state and liable to 
attacks from the enemy. 

In compliance with this order, Gen. Dearborn made a re- 
quisition upon Governor Plumer for a detachment of troops, 
for the defense of the sea-coast, to be stationed at Ports- 
mouth. The requisition was complied with forthwith by 
His Excellency, as on the 20th of June, 1812, he ordered 
General Clement Storer of the first Brigade to detach two 
companies from his command for that purpose. Both com- 
panies were on duty by the 30th of the month ; one under 
the command of Capt. Robert Neal, and the other that of 
Capt. Samuel Shackford, both gentlemen of Portsmouth. 



14 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL 7 S REPORT. 



Roll op Capt. Robert Neal's Company. 



Names. 



Robert Neal, Captain, 
Robert F. Phipps, 2d Lt 
John Marden, Sergt. 
Josiah Ackerman, Sergt 
Wm. Plaisted, " 

John Goodrich, " 

Charles Reading, Corp'l, 
William Cate, 
Joseph Green, " 

Elisha Plaisted, " 

Elisha Adams, Musician. 
Samuel Foss, 

PRIVATES. 

James Brown, 
Peter Bonner, 
William Bartlett, 
John Bartlett, 
Robert Bartlett, 
William Briggs, 
Samuel S. Colby, 
Andrew Cunningham, 
John T. Dame, 
Benj. Foss, 
John Field, 
Ivory Grant, 
George Green, 
Benj. Henderson, 
John Hicks, 
John Jenness, 
Joseph Kelly, 
Richard R. Lock, 
Joseph Lock, 
Richard Langdon, 
Levi Leavitt, 
Enoch Lewis, 
Daniel Lowd, 
'Charles Marble, 
John McCann, 
Robert Mow, 
Wm. Oxford, 
Reuben Philbric, 
William Pease, 
Benjamin Philbric, 
Simeon Pottle, 
Henry S. Pitman, 
Micawbah Pailsley, 
William Petigrew, 
James Robinson, 
Benjamin Simpson, 
Theodore Seavey, 
John Sanders, 
Samuel Sherive, 
William Spinney, 
Daniel Smith, 
Jeremiah Woods, 
Daniel Dearborn, 
Charles Tucker, 



When enlisted. Discharged. Residence and Remarks. 



1812. 
June 29 
30 

28 

28 

28 

29 

28 

28 

28 

29 

28 

28 

28 

July 7 

June 28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

July 7 

June 28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

7 

1 

7 

7 

June 28 

July 1 

June 28 

29 

28 

Aug. 2 

June 28 

July 



July 



Aug. 
July 



1 

7 
4 
7 
1 

Aug. 5 

June 28 

29 

28 

28 

28 

July 7 

June 28 

28 

28 

28 

28 

28 



1812 
August 31 



July 



Fort McClart, I 
Nov. 14, 1812. ) 
Sir, — This certifies that 
I saAv Levi Leavitt. be- 
longing to Capt. Neal's 
Company of Artillery of 
N. H. Militia, sign the re- 
ceipt roll for his pav to 
Aug. 31st, 1812. 
I remain vours, 

J. H. Ham, 
Ensign at Fort Mc Clary. 



10 Excused from duty July 11th, 
1812, bv a certificate from 
Aug". 31 | Dr. Cutter. 



military history of new-hampshire. 15 

Roll of Capt. Samuel Shackford's Company. 



Names. 


Enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Residence and Remarks. 




1812. 






Samuel Shackford, Capt. 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




John H. Ham, Ensign, 


" 


" 




Matthew Clark, " 


« 


a 


Acting Lieutenant. 


John Henly, Sergeant, 


a 


a 




Joseph Lock, " 


July 8 


Jan. 8, 1813 




Wm. Smith, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




David C. Foster, " 


ee 


n 




Samuel Neal, Corporal, 


" 


u 




John Storer, " 


it 


(i 




Thomas Webb, " 


tt 


a 




William Ilsley, " 


a 


ce 




George Lang, Musician, 


tt 


'" 




Benj. Poor, " 


" 


a 




PRIVATES. 




(C 




Nath'l W. Adams, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




John Bergen, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




Wm. Brooke, 


" 


a 




Geo. Coleman, 


« 


a 




Sam'l W. Child, 


" 


a 




Nath'l Colebath, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




Daniel Davis, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




Paul Dame, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




Samuel N. Fowler, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




John Green, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




Wm. Ham, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




Fames Holmes, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




Foseph Holmes, 


" 


a 




Fohn Haines, 


" 


a 




Benj. Hobbs, 


tt 


u 




Benj. Hodgdon, 


« 


a 




Daniel Lamprey, 


" 


(i 




Sben'r Leavitt, 


" 


(C 




lohn Moody, 


it 


a 


Detached Oct. 24, 1812, 


Thomas Mace, 


« 


« 




Hark Nutter, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




Charles Nutter, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




5enj. Page, 








Samuel Parker, 


June 30 


Dec. 30, 1812 




Cben'r Shannon, 


Aug. 6 


Feb. 6, 1813 




ohn L. Sanborn, 


<■<■ 


a 




xeo. Silloway, 


« 


« 




oshua Towle, 


" 


it 




Jath'l Tarlton, 


u 


(( 




oseph Wiggins. 


<c 


(i 





Both the companies were placed, for a time, under the 
ommand of Lieut. Col. John Darrington, of the U. S. 
,rmy, who had command of that post. Subsequently two 
ther companies were added, and the battalion was placed 
nder the command of Major John Basse tt, of the Tth 



16 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



Kegiment. Capt. Neal's Company was discharged Aug. 
31, but Capt. Shackford's Company was kept on duty till 
the beginning of the following year. 

The third company of this battalion, under command of 
Major Bassett, was drafted from the 4th Regiment, and was 
under the command of Capt. Joseph Towle, of Epping. 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Towle's Company. 



Names. 


Enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Residence and Remarks. 




1812. 


1812. 




Joseph Towle, Captain, 


July 3 


August 30 




Ruel Brown, Sergeant, 


2 


a 




Joseph Came, " 


2 


« 




John Came, 


2 


a 




Reuben French, " 


2 


a 




Ephraim French, " 


2 


tt 




Hall J. Jenness, Corporal 


2 


it 




Andrew W. Doe, " 


2 


tt 




Thomas Wiggin, " 


2 


a 




Joseph Doe, Musician, 


2 


tt 




Moses C. Goodrich, " 


1 


tt 




PRIVATES. 








Israel Blake, 


1 






John Bassett, 


31 






Calvin Brown, 


Aug. 2 






John Cooper, 


3 






Daniel Cochran, 


2 






Jeremiah Eastman, 


1 






John Emerson, 


2 






Thomas Edmands, 3d. 


2 






Josiah French, 


July 31 






Thomas Flanders, 


31 






Frederic Greenleaf, 


31 






Nathan Goodwin, 


31 






John Greenough, 


31 






Joseph George, 


Aug. 2 






Israel Gilman, 


15 






Jesse P. Heath, 


July 31 






Daniel M. Heath, 


31 






John B. Osborn, 


Aug. 2 






Caleb Page, 


1 






Sampson Powers, 


3 






Alkut Perkins, 


2 






Moses Stevens, 


July 31 






Jeremiah Sias, 


Aug. 2 






Asa Shaw, 


2 






John Sleeper, 


3 






William Sleeper, 


14 






David Tolford, 


July 31 






David Williams, 


31 







MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 17 

This company entered the service July 3, and was dis- 
charged August 31, 1812, having been drafted for only 
thirty days' service. 

Meantime, Governor Plumer ordered Brigadier-General 
Asa Robinson, of the 3d brigade, to detach a company of 
artillery from the brigade under his command for the 
defense of Portsmouth. The order was complied with, 
and the company sent forward as ordered. It was under 
the command of Capt. John Leonard, of Londonderry, and 
the draft was for six months, unless sooner discharged. 
It was attached to Major Bassett's Battalion, and was 
stationed at Jaffrey's Point, which commands Little Har- 
bor, the western entrance to the harbor of Portsmouth, 
where a battery had been erected, by order of the Gov- 
ernor, consisting of " two nine-pounders." Capt. Leonard's 
Company was discharged Nov. 30, following. Its roll was 
thus : * 



* The name of Moses C. Pillsbury is upon the roll as Sergeant. This was the well 
known Capt. Moses C. Pillsbury for many years the able and efficient Warden of the 
New Hampshire State Prison. 

2 



18 



adjutant-general's report. 



Roll of Capt. John Leonard's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Residence and Remarks. 




1812. 


1812. 




John Leonard, Capt. 


August 17 


Nov. 


30 


Londonderry. 


Moses C. Pillsbury, Sergt. 




Dec. 


3 


" 


Josiah Bailey, " 






" 


New Salem. 


Keser C. Powell, " 




Nov. 


30 


Concord. 


Curtis Laws, " 




Dec. 


1 


Northwood. 


Samuel Powell, Corporal, 




Nov. 


30 


Concord. 


Elisba Clough, " 






" 


Bow. 


Gideon Moor, " 




Dec. 


1 


Northwood. 


Eben. Flanders, Musician, 




Nov. 


30 


Concord. 


Leonard Ayer. " 




Dec. 


3 


New Salem. 


PRIVATES. 










Solomon Man, 




Nov. 


30 


Concord. 


Moody Dustin, 




Dec. 


3 


Pembroke. 


Ed la Foster, 






<< 


'< 


William Abbott, 






" 


ti 


Roswell Bush, 






2 


Chester, 26 days out, absenl 


Daniel Wilson, 






" 


without leave. 


Moses Cromby, 






" 


Chester. 


Jacob Parker, 


August 18 




" 


" 


S imuel Robertson, 


August 17 


Nov. 


30 


Bow. 


Jonathan Stevens, Corp'l. 






" 


Concord. 


James Foster, 






" 


" 


William Clough, 






" 


Bow. 


Abial Bradley, 






" 


Concord. 


John Carter, jr., 








Bow. 


Joseph Kobie, 




Dec. 


2 


Raymond. 


Winthrop S. Dearborn, 








Candia. 


Wm. Turner, 






" 


" 


Josiah Whicher, 






« 


" 


Jona. Elliott, 3d, 


Nov. 30 




" 


Concord. 


Jonathan F. Elliott, 


August 17 


Nov. 


30 


'• 


Benjamin C. Walding, 






" 


" 


Ebenezer Fry, 






" 


" 


Jacob Nute, 




Dec. 


2 


Deerfield. 


Joshua Bishop, 






" 


" 


Wm. Coffin, sub. 








" 


Samuel Simpson, 






" 


" 


Mudgett, sub. E. Thurstin, 






" 


" 


Saml. Coffin sub. for 






" 




David Chase, 






" 


ti 


John Palmer, 




Dec. 


3 


Londonderry. 


Moses Messer, 






" 


" 


John Plumer, 






" 


" 


David Wilson, 






" 


" 


John Saunders for 










B. Woodbury, 






t< 


(i 


James Whittimore for 










N. Towns, 






" 


a 


James Ingalls, 






" 


New Salem. 


Frederick Hardy, 






" 


Pelham. 


Phinehas Coburn, 






" 


" 


William Balch, 






" 


Y'indham. 


Enoch Worthen, 






" 


Candia. 


Josiah H. Allen, 






" 


Epsom. 


William Stevens, 






" 


.< 


Francis Powell, 






11 


Concord. 


Daniel Weeks, 






" 




Benjamin York, 






" 


" 


Samuel W. Evans, 




" 


Allenstown. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



19 



. Fears for the safety of Portsmouth still increasing, the 
Governor ordered Brigadier-General Clement Storer, of the 
1st brigade, to detach another company from his command. 
The draft was made, and the company placed under the 
command of Capt. Joseph Towle, of Epping. It entered 
the service Sept. 1, and was discharged November 30, 1812. 
It was attached to the command of Major John JBassett 
and its roll was as follows : — 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Towle's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



Discharged. 



Residence and Remarks. 



Joseph Towle, Captain, 
Sbenezer Smith, Lieut. 
} aul Brown, Sergt. 
John Came, 
lall J. Jenness, " 
leuben French, " 
£phraim French, " 
Lndrew W. Doe, " 
Thomas Wiggins, Corp'l. 
John P. Harvy, " 
lumphrey Chase, Musi'n. 
reorge Grant. " 

PRIVATES. 

benezer Allen, 
srael Blake, 
J-eorge Beck, 
olm Bassett, 
alvin Brown, 
ohn Cooper, 
)aniel Cochran, 
>seph Doe, 
ohn Emerson, 
nomas Edmonds, 
,evi Eastman , 
saac Eastman, 
osiah French, 
homas Flanders, 
ohn C. Gates, 
athan Gooding, 
ohn Greenougl), 
loses C. Goodrich, 

ue Greenleaf, 
oseph George, 
rael Gilman, 
essee Heath, 
aniel Heath, 
ohn Hadford, 
oseph More, 
ohn B. Osborn, 
aleb Page, 
unpson Powers, 
lcot Perkins, 

lliam Sleeper, 
m Stevens, 
ohn Sleeper, 

oses Stevens, 
eremiah Sias, 
sa Shaw, 
avid Talford, 
avid Williams, 



1812. 
Sept. 1 
Aug. 18 

Sept. 1 



Oct. 1 

2 

Sept. 1 



Sept. 1 



Oct. 12 
Sept. 1 



1812. 

Nov. 30 

30 

Sep. 1 

Nov. 30 



Sept. 
Nov. 



Sept. 1 
Nov. 30 



Sept. 1 

Nov. 30 

Sept. 1 

Nov. 30 



Sept. 1 
Nov. 20 



Eben Alton Ids substitute. 

George Beck substitute. 

Substitute for I. Blake. 
Sub. for Moses Stevens. 



Sub. for Paul Brown. 
I. P. Harvy sub. 
Sub. for E. French. 



Sub. Moses C. Goodrich. 



J. Hartford sub. 

Sub. Isaac Eastman, 
Sub. for Nathan Goodwin. 
John Sleeper. 



Joseph More. 
George Grant. 



20 adjutant-genekal's eeport. 

About the same time, upon representation of the people 
in the north part of the state, that there was danger of pre 
datory excursions of the enemy from Canada, and that con 
traband trade was rife on that frontier, defrauding our gov 
ernment of its revenue and furnishing the enemy with sup 
plies, Governor Plumer informed the Government of tin 
state of things, and Gen. Dearborn made a requisition fo: 
another company of detached militia to be stationed in tha 
quarter. The requisition was forthwith complied with, anc 
through an order from Brig. Gen. John Montgomery,- of thi 
6th brigade, a company was detached to be stationed a 
Stewartstown. This company was under the command o 
Capt. Ephraim H. Mahurin.* It entered the service Jul; 
27, 1812, and was discharged January 27, 1813, behn 
drafted for six months. Its roll was as follows : — 

* Capt. Mahurin was of Stratford. He was born in Westmoreland, March 1 , 178( 
He received a good education in the academies of Chesterfield, N.H., and Middleburj 
Vt. After closing his studies at the academy he spent two years as a student at lai 
in the office of Roger Vose of Walpole. He remained there about two years, but lei 
before completing his studies and settled in Stratford, where he ever after remaine( 
Of good education, a fair knowledge of law, and a practical surveyor, he soon becam 
identified with the interests, public as well as private, of Coos County. At the breal 
ing out of the war he was appointed an officer of the Customs on the frontiers of Ne- 
Hampshire and Vermont. When acting as such he was ordered with his company 1 
take post at Stewartstown, as above mentioned. About this time Samuel Hugh, Esq 
a prominent man of Essex County, Vt., was abducted from his home and imprisone 
in Montreal. Capt. Mahurin, as agent, visited Montreal and Washington, to obtai 
Mr. Hugh's release, and accomplished the object of his mission. He repeatedly repn 
sented Stratford and other classed towns in the Legislature. He performed the durii 
of Deputy Sheriff and Sheriff for more than twenty-five years, being High Sheriff i 
the County of Coos from 1824 to 1829. As Surveyor he was employed by the Commi: 
sioners of New Hampshire during the " Indian Stream " difficulties in 1836, to exploi 
the highlands betwixt the sources of the St. Francis and Connecticut rivers, to asce: 
tain the north-western-most branch of the latter river, which duty he performed in 
satisfactory manner. He was Road Commissioner in 1850-1, which was his last publ 
office. Capt. Mahurin was a man of great energy and'enterprise, and in addition toh 
other duties was engaged, in a greater or less degree, in mercantile pursuits throug 
his varied life. He died at Stratford March 4, 1859, in the 80th year of his age. 

John Page, jr., was the Lieut, of Capt. Mahurin's company. He was the son of Jol 
Page of Haverhill, and was born May 21, 1787. His father was the first white man th 
ever "wintered" in the town of Haverhill. John Page, jr., had no great liking i 
military life. Of retired habits he was the better fitted for civil life, and residing up 
the old homestead his delight was to be a successful farmer. He represented the to\ 
of Haverhill in the Legislature in 1818, '19, '20, and '35. He was Register of Deeds f 
the County of Grafton in 1827, '29, '30, '31, '32, 33, '34, and '35. In 1835 he was elect 
Councilor for the Grafton District. The following year he was elected to the "0", 
Senate to serve the unexpired term of Governor Hill, who had resigned. He was Go 
ernor of New Hampshire in 1839, '40, and '41. To his interest in agricultural mattt 
is the State indebted for the Geological Survey of the State, and Dr. Jackson's Rep< 
of the same. He was an honest, upright man, and had the respect of the people of t 
State to a great degree. He died Sept. 8, 1865, in the S4th year of his age. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



21 






Roll of Capt. E. H. Mahurin's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Time served. 


Residence and Remarks. 




1812. 






Eph. H. Mahurin, Captain. 


July 12 


6 months. 


Stratford. 


John Page, Jr., Lieutenant. 


27 




Haverhill. Lamed by acci- 
dent, Sept. 28, 1812, and not 
yet recovered. 


Perkins Fellows, Ensign. 


27 


" 


Piermont. 


Elijah Caswell, Sergeant. 


27 


" 


Orford. 


Joshua H.Johnson, " 


29 


" 


Haverhill. 


Enoch Page, Jr., " 


27 


" 


Wentworth. 


George Libbey, " 


27 


" 


Warren. 


Richard Whiteman, Corp. 


27 


it 


Warren. 


Samuel Keyes, " 


29 


" 


Orford. 


Nath'l Merrill, Jr., " 


27 


" 


Piermont. Discharged for 
disability, October 11, 1812. 


Ithamar Pillsbury, " 


21 


" 


Piermont. 


John Abbot, Drummer, 


21 


" 


Haverhill. 


Joseph Edmonds, Eifer. 


29 


" 


Coventry. 


PRIVATES. 








Ezra Abbott, 


27 


« 


Piermont. 


David Bixby, 


27 


tt 


Piermont. 


Thomas A. Clark, 


27 


" 


Orford. 


Sanders W. Cooper, 


29 


" 


Orford. 


Jeremiah Raines, Jr., 


29 


" 


Orford. 


Jonas Flagg, 


27 


" 


Haverhill. 


A.rad Ford, 


27 


" 


Haverhill. 


Henry Hale, 


27 


" 


Orford. 


Amos Hogins, 


27 


" 


Piermont. 


Benjamin Johnson, 


27 


" 


Piermont. 


Levi Judd, 


27 




Haverhill. Burned by ac- 
cident, Sept. 6, 1812, lit for 
duty Oct. 5, 1812. 


William Leicester, 


27 


tt 


Wentworth. 


Nathaniel Ijibbey. 


27 


" 


Warren. 


James Locke, 


29 


t( 


Orford. 


Ephraim Lund, 


27 


" 


Warren. 


Joseph Mason, Jr., 


29 


" 


Orford. 


Wire McConnel, 


27 


" 


Piermont. 


Robert McKeon, 


27 


" 


Haverhill. 


William M. Morris, 


27 


" 


Orford. 


Calvin Morse, Jr., 


27 


it 


Orford. 


Daniel Pillsbury, 


27 


a 


Warren. 


Joseph Pillsbury, 


27 


" 


Warren. 


Joshua Putney," 


27 


" 


Wentworth. 


Jesse Rice, 


29 


it 


Orford. 


tfath'l Richardson, 


27 


« 


Warren. 


David Sanders. Jr., 


27 


tt 


Wentworth. 


Benj. Smith, Jr., 


27 


tt 


Wentworth. 


John Stearns, 


27 


a 


Haverhill. 


Joshua Stevens, 


29 


" 


Orford. 


■Nathan Stevens, 


29 


" 


Haverhill. 


iVilliam Tarbox, Jr., 


27 


" 


Piermont. Returned to this 








post fit for dutv, Sep. 12, 

1812. 

Piermont. 


Slias C. Warren, 


27 


a 


Jonathan Weeks, 


27 


tt 


Warren. 


Moses Welsh, 


27 


tt 


Coventry. 


Samuel Welsh, 


29 


" 


Warren. 


Jacob Which er, 


27 


" 


Coventry. 


Dbediah Whicher, 


29 


tt 


Orford. 


John Woodbury, 


27 


tt 


Piermont. Sept. 1,1812, cut 
by an axe while hewing tim- 
ber for blockhouse, and not 
vet fit for active service. 


Hoses Woodbury, 


27 


tt 


Piermont. 


5amuel Woodbury, 


27 


" 


Haverhill. 



22 adjutant-general's report. 

On the 23d of July, 1812, Governor Plumer issued a 
General Order completing the organization of the detached 
militia of the state commenced by Governor Langdon by 
his General Order of May 29, 1812. By this order, so much 
of said detached militia as was from the first, second, and 
third brigades of the militia of this State was made to com- 
pose one brigade, to be known as the Eastern Brigade, and 
to be commanded by Brigadier-General Clement Storer.* 
So much of said detached militia as was from the fourth, 
fifth, and sixth brigades was made to compose a second 
brigade to be known as the Western Brigade, and to be 
commanded by Brigadier-General John Montgomery.-) 

* General Clement Storer was of Portsmouth. He was the son of Capt. John Storei 
of Kennebunk, Me., where he was horn in 1760. His mother was a sister of Dr. Clem- 
ent March of Greenland. Clement Storer came to Portsmouth about 1781, and reac 
Medicine with Dr. Ammi P. Cutter. After passing a year in Europe he settled at Ports- 
mouth, and married Dorothy, a daughter of Dr. Cutter. Of fine personal appearance 
and urbane manners, Dr. Storer soon became a favorite of the people, not only in his 
profession but in civil life. Having no great love for his profession, and his marriage 
placing him beyond the necessity of practising his profession, he early entered publie 
life, and for many years was a prominent politician. He represented his adopted towi 
in the Legislature for several years. Was elected a Representative in Congress, in 1807 
was Speaker of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, in 1812; a Member o: 
the same, in 1813, and a Member of the U. S. Senate, 1817 to 1820, succeeding Hon 
Jeremiah Mason. Meantime he held the various offices in the New Hampshire Militia 
from Captain to Major-General, being in command of the 1st Battalion of the 1st Regi- 
ment in 1796 ; Lt. Colonel Commandant of the same from 1799 to 1801 ; Brigadier-Genera 
of the 1st Brigade from 1804 to 1813; Major-General of the 1st Division from 1813 t< 
1820, when he resigned. He was also High Sheriff of the County of Rockingham fron 
1818 to 1824. Gen Storer was an upright, honorable man, and had the esteem in the 
highest degree, of the community in which he lived. He died November 21, 1830, in th( 
71st year of his age. 

t Gen. John Montgomery was of Haverhill. He was the grandson of Thomas Mont- 
gomery, of the County of Armagh, in Ireland. His son, John Montgomery, was bon 
in 1730 in Armagh, emigrated to America in 1749, landing in Boston, and soon aftei 
settling in Londonderry, where he married Mary, the daughter of Capt. George Knox 
stationed at Halifax, and the grand-daughter of Hugh Montgomery, whose wife was i 
McGregor, doubtless a relative of the Rev. Mr. McGregor, the Minister of Londonderry 
and hence the presence of the grand-daughter in that town. John Montgomery diec 
March 4, 1802; his son, General John Montgomery, was born in 1764, and removed tx 
Haverhill, where he engaged largely in mercantile pursuits. He married a daughtei 
of Jonathan and Zilpah (Adams) Ring, and their descendants are among the most re- 
spectable citizens of the state. He engaged in early life in military affairs as an officei 
in the 13th Regiment of New Hampshire Militia, was Major of the 2d Battalion of thai 
regiment from 1804 to 1806, and was Lt. Colonel Commandant of that regiment fron 
1806 to 1812. June 15, 1812, he was appointed by Governor Plumer Brigadier-Genera 
of the 6th Brigade of the New Hampshire Militia. The 23d of July, 1812, upon the com 
pletion of the organization of the detached militia, General Montgomery was appointee 
by Governor Plumer Brigadier-General of the "Western Brigade" of the detachee 
militia of New Hampshire, and as such received the thanks of the Governor in hi: 
Message in November, 1812. In 1814, when the brigade was ordered to Portsmouth 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 23 

These two brigades, thus constituted, were made to form a 
division, commanded by Major-General Henry Butler.* 
About the middle of July, for fear of an attack upon Ports- 
mouth and the Navy Yard near, Fort McClary, on the east 
bank of the Piscataqua (then in Massachusetts, but now in 
Maine), was garrisoned by a detachment of New Hampshire 
Militia, under command of Major Timothy Upham of the 
21st Regiment of U. S. Infantry. Major Bassettf was also 
for a time in command of this detachment. 

These precautions were highly necessary, and probably 
prevented an attack upon the Navy Yard and possibly the 
town of Portsmouth, as British vessels were cruising off the 
coast and had even entered the bay of the Piscataqua. At 
any rate, great excitement and consternation existed among 
the people of Portsmouth, and upon the sea-board generally ; 
families, women and children, and valuables of every kind 
were being sent into the country for safety. Rumors of the 
landing of the enemy and predatory attacks were of fre- 
quent occurrence, and these early measures for defense sug- 
gested and carried out by Governor Plumer allayed excite- 

General Montgomery accompanied the same and rendered important service. He was 
appointed Major-General of the 2d Division, New Hampshire Militia, Oct. 18, 1818, and 
resigned in 1821. Gen. Montgomery was a man of great energy and enterprise; was 
largely engaged through life in mercantile pursuits, had a commanding influence in 
the northern section of the State, and enjoyed largely the esteem of its citizens. He 
died at Haverhill, February 25, 1825, aged 61 years. 

* General Henry Butler was of Nottingham. He took an active part in the war of 
the Revolution. He was Captain of the 8th Company in Col. Thomas Bartlett's Regi- 
ment raised in 1780 for the defense of West Point. After the Revolution, upon the re- 
organization of the militia in this State, he took an active part in military affairs. He 
was Lt. Col. Commandant of the 18th Regiment in 1796, Brigadier-General of the 3d 
Brigade from 1799 to 1805, and Major-General of the first Division of New Hampshire 
Militia from 1805 to 1812. His experience as a soldier in the field led to his appoint- 
ment by Governor Plumer in 1812 as Major-General of the Division of New Hampshire 
Detached Militia. Before called into active service as commander of the Division of 
Detached Militia, Gen. Butler died at Nottingham, July 20, 1813, in the 59th year of 
bds age. 

tCol. John Bassett was from Atkinson. He was born in Norton, Mass., April 14, 
1762. He was a house-carpenter by trade, and settling in Atkinson soon after his ma- 
jority, he followed that business through his active life. He was a man of sound 
udgment, and aside from minor offices in his adopted town, he represented it in the 
Legislature in 1807 and 1809. He was much in military life and was an excellent officer. 
From a private in the militia of Atkinson, he rose through the various grades, and in 
l804 was Major of the 2d Battalion of the 7th Regiment of the New Hampshire Militia. 
fie was Lt. Col. Commandant of the same Regiment in 1812, and as such was selected 
>y Governor Plumer to command the detachment ordered to Portsmouth, with the 
•ank of Major. In 1819 he was appointed Colonel of the 7th Regiment, and resigned 
r au. 1820. Col. Bassett died at Atkinson, Oct. 1, 1826, in the 65th year of his age. 



24 adjutant-general's report. 

nient and restored confidence among the people, so that 
they could pursue their daily avocations, if they effected 
no other purpose. But they accomplished another important 
object. Then, as now, and in all ages, there were men of sor- 
did minds and great avarice, ready to sacrifice their country 
and its interests on the altars of Treason and Mammon. 
Treasonable and illicit intercourse was carried on with the 
enemy on the sea-board and upon our northern frontier. 
Supplies for the enemy were of frequent occurrence in 
these directions. Fresh provisions passed through these 
channels from the interior, and were exchanged for dry 
goods, spices, and the like, from the enemy. Thus the 
government was defrauded of its dues, and demoralization 
was becoming rife among the people. The forces thus 
early placed at these extreme and exposed points checked in 
a great measure this illicit trade and traitorous intercourse. 
But while fears of war merely existed in this part of the 
Union, war with all its aggravated horrors raged in 1812 
on our northern and western frontiers. The Indians upon 
the Great Lakes and the rivers tributary to the Mississippi, 
under the insidious influence of emissaries of the British 
Government residing among them, had become openly 
hostile to our government, and had committed many depre- 
dations upon the persons and property of our citizens upon 
the exposed and unprotected frontiers. As early as the 
spring of 1811 our government had determined to restrain 
the turbulent intentions of these Indians by chastisement or 
negotiation. Gen. Wm. H. Harrison with a force of militia 
and regulars was ordered to Yincennes with that intent. 
Lt. Colonel James Miller, of New Hampshire, lately com- 
missioned as such, was attached at this time as Major of the 
4th U. S. Infantry, under the command of Col. John P. 
Boyd. This regiment was stationed in the harbor of Bos- 
ton and was ordered to join Gen. Harrison's army at Yin- 
cennes, by the way of Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and New- 
port, Ky. Col. Miller accompanied the regiment, and at 
Newport took command of the same, Col. Boyd having 
joined the army at Yincennes at the request of Gen. Har- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE 25 

rison. The descent of the Ohio for three hundred miles, 
and the ascent of the Wabash for one hundred and seventy 
miles more, was one of exhausting labor and the severest 
toil. The troops were transported in boats some sixty or 
seventy feet in length, and these had to be hauled past 
snags and sawyers and over bars and rapids by main 
strength, the men often wading for hours in water to the 
middle, and the gallant Colonel sharing this toil with his 
soldiers. They were from the 30th of August to the 19th 
of September in performing this toilsome voyage from New- 
port to Vincennes ! But steamers were then things un- 
known upon the western waters. Arrived at Vincennes, 
the regiment at once went into camp with the army and 
commenced drilling for Indian warfare, as the Indians were 
determined upon resistance under the influence of the able 
warrior Tecumseh and his brother " the Prophet." 

On the 27th of September, the army broke camp, and 
marched for " the Prophet's" town, in the neighborhood of 
Tippecanoe, — where they arrived the 2d of October, — 
seventy miles from Vincennes. Here they halted and built 
Fort Harrison. 

On the the 29th of October the army moved forward for 
the principal Indian town, Tippecanoe ; arriving the 6th of 
November near the town, where it was met by messengers 
Torn the Indians desiring an amicable conference. By 
greement hostilities were postponed till morning, when 
;he conference was to take place ; but the Indians broke 
he armistice, and just before break of day on the morning 
)f the 7th of November commenced a furious attack upon 
)ur camp. Nothing saved the army from defeat, but the 
)recaution of sleeping in order of battle. Aroused, and 
unning in front of the white tents, the soldiers became 
onspicuous marks for Indian rifles. The tents were 
[uickly struck, and then commenced a furious struggle for 
he mastery. Sometimes the awful struggle was main- 
ained hand to hand, and then again our soldiers had no 
nemy in sight, but only in hearing, and were obliged to 
end their leaden messengers at the flashes of the Indian 



26 adjutant-general's report. 

rifles from each bush and tree. Thus the strife continued, 
our men suffering dreadful slaughter ; but at length the 
savages gave way, and our army remained victors upon 
the field. The 4th U. S. Regiment was in the thickest of 
the fight, and in it were the men of New Hampshire.* 
Its gallant Lieut. Colonel, however, was chafing at Fort 
Harrison, having been struck down by the climate fever, 
from which he never fully recovered, but which finally 
ended in paralysis and death, f 

In May, 1812, the gallant Fourth, still under the com- 
mand of Lieut. Colonel Miller, marched to join General 



* John Langdon Eastman, of Concord, was Adjutant of the 4th Regiment. He -was 
born at the East Village in Concord, and was the son of Jonathan Eastman, Esq., 
being born November 31, 1786. He served with credit, was promoted to a mayorship, 
and, when retiring from the army, settled as a farmer in Fryeburg, Me. Subse- 
quently he removed to Concord, but after tarrying a few years, returned with his 
family to Fryeburg, where he died June 12, 1865, aged 78 years. 

t Col. Miller was a native of Peterborough, the son of James Miller, of that town, 
who was of " Scotch-Irish " stock, from the North of Ireland, and was born April 25, 
1776. After pursuing his studies in the Academy at Amherst, and for a time in the 
College at Middlebury, Vt., he entered upon the study of law in the office of James 
Wilson, Esq., of Peterborough,. Having finished his course of study, he was admitted 
to the bar of his native county in 1803. He settled in the practice of the law in the 
neighboring town of Greenfield, where he was soon in command of the company of 
artillery attached to the 26th Regiment of the N. H. Militia. His military bearing, 
aptitude, and skill in manoeuvring and drill, attracted the attention of Gen. Benjamin 
Pierce, and at his earnest recommendation, Capt. Miller was appointed Major of the 
4th Regiment of U. S. Infantry, commanded by Col. John P. Boyd, and then sta- 
tioned at Fort Independence, in the harbor of Boston. His commission bears date 
March 3, 1809, taking rank from the 8th of July, 1808. This regiment contained many 
officers and men from New Hampshire, and after Major Miller's appointment to it, 
many more joined the regiment from the interior of New Hampshire. At the battles 
of Brownstown, Chippewa, Niagara, and "the sortie on Erie," he won distinguished 
honors. After the battle of Niagara he was made a Brigadier. On the 3d of Novem- 
ber, 1814, Congress presented him with a gold medal and the unanimous thanks ot 
that body. The State of New York, through its Senate and Assembly, presented him 
with a sword. It is inscribed as follows : — 

"Presented by his Excellency, Daniel D. Tompkins, Governor of the State of New- 
York, pursuant to resolutions of the Senate and Assembly of the said State, to Briga- 
dier-General Miller, as a testimony of gratitude for his services, and admiration of his 
gallant conduct." 

Upon the close of the war, General Miller returned to his native State, and devoted 
himself to agricultural pursuits. 

In 1819, he was appointed Governor of the Territory of Arkansas, by President Mon- 
roe, but the climate not agreeing with him, in 1823 he returned to Temple in poor 
health. The following year he was appointed Collector of the Port of Salem. This 
position he held for twenty-four years, when his health becoming still more enfeebled 
by paralysis, in 1849, he resigned his office of collector, and was succeeded by his 
youngest son. Upon his resignation, he retired to his farm in Temple, where he died 
July 7, 1851, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. General Miller was a Christian and 
a gentleman as well as a gallant soldier. He won the respect of all who knew him. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 27 

Hull at Detroit, Mich., by the way of Dayton, Ohio. Soon 
after his arrival preparations were made by General Hull 
for invading Canada. Accordingly, on the 12th of July, 
he crossed the Detroit river with two thousand regulars 
and volunteers, unmolested, and encamped on the Canada 
shore. The next day he issued a vaunting proclamation 
promising the blessings of civil and religious liberty to the 
people of Canada. Col. Miller under date of July 14, 
1812, thus wrote as to the crossing of our army into Canada : 
r We remained at Detroit until Sunday morning the 12th 
inst., when we marched up Detroit river about a mile and 
a half to a convenient place to embark in boats. I, with the 
4th Regiment and a regiment of militia under command of 
Col. Cass, from the State of Ohio, with a company of artil- 
lery under command of Capt. Dyson, crossed the river very 
soon. I had the command of the whole, as the General did 
not pass until we sent back the boats for two other regi- 
ments, which were unable to pass with us for want of craft 
to carry them. We expected to meet with considerable op- 
position in crossing the river, as the British had been at 
work several days throwing up a breastwork, and had been 
seen carrying up several pieces of cannon. With a glass 
we could see their soldiers and movements from our shore, 
but were never able to see but one or two hundred troops. 
They had frequently sent up parties of Indians, but the In- 
dians dare not stay. As we were crossing the river we saw 
two British officers ride up very fast, opposite where we in- 
tended landing, but they went back faster than they came. 
They were Col. St. George, the commanding officer of Fort 
Maiden, and one of his captains. However, we landed 
safely. * * * * * I had the honor and the gratifica- 
tion, as commanding officer, to plant with my own hands the 
first United States Standard on the pleasant bank of De- 
troit river, in King George's Province of Upper Canada.* 
We have it now waving by the gentle breeze of Heaven, and 

*Col. Miller was wont to relate that as he got the flag-staff erected and. his hands 
pon the halliards, he called upon Col. Cass to assist him, and they hauled up the flag 
X)gether. 



28 adjutant-general's report. 

well supported by brave and true American soldiers. The 
common people are generally friendly disposed, and very 
glad to see us. When we shall march against Maiden is 
not yet known, but I presume not for a number of 
days."* Hull's purpose was doubtless to attack Maiden 
and then go against Montreal. A man of greater 
daring and executive ability might have done this, but Hull 
lost his opportunity by delay, giving General Brock oppor- 
tunity to call in his savage allies, collect the Canada militia, 
drill and concentrate his raw troops, and cut off Hull's com- 
munication with the lakes and Ohio, from whence he re- 
ceived his supplies. His situation became critical, and he 
determined to open his communication with Ohio. For 
this object he detached a force of regulars, with two field- 
pieces, under command of Colonel Miller. The troops 
began their march at five o'clock, P. M., on the 8th of 
August, 1812. Certain citizens of Detroit volunteered as 
spies, and the detachment moved off in the highest spirits. 
They arrived at the river Rogue, six miles below Detroit, 
about sunset, but did not succeed in crossing the river till 
ten o'clock at night. There they encamped, and at early 
dawn of the 9th, took up their march. They proceeded 
through the settlements some five miles, and entered the 
woods, which were occupied here and there by an Indian 
hut and clearing, but met with no enemy. As they passed 
from the woods into an open field covered with rank corn, 
— the clearing of a celebrated chief, Walk-in-the-water, — 
they were fired upon by ten Indians, who were on horse- 
back, and concealed behind the house of this chief, and 
one man, a volunteer from Detroit, was killed and scalped 
before his body could be rescued. The entire American 
force was quickly moved up, but the Indians had escaped. 
They were only a party sent out from the British fort at 
Brownstown to watch the movements of the Americans, 
and to give notice of their approach. The British fortifica- 
tions were in an oak opening, at the base of some rising 
ground, over which the Americans were to pass. They con- 

* Letter to Mrs. Miller. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 29 

sisted of a breastwork of trees, logs, and the like, with two 
flanks. Behind the breastwork, which lay directly in the 
path or trail, the British regulars of the Forty-First Regi- 
ment of foot were posted, two deep, under command of 
Major Muer, the officer long in command at Fort Maiden. 
The flank of the enemy's right was lined with Canadian 
militia and Indians, under the command of Walk-in-tlie- 
water and Marpot. The militia were painted, and in Indian 
costume. 

The left flank was lined exclusively by Indian warriors 
under the command of the noted Tecumseh. The British 
force amounted to seven hundred and fifty : two hundred reg- 
ulars, a hundred militia and four hundred and fifty Indians. 

At 12 M. our troops halted in an Indian clearing, its 
huts deserted, for refreshments. In an hour they resumed 
their march and had proceeded but little way when Capt. 
Snelling, of the advanced guard, found the enemy and com- 
menced the attack, firing a volley and receiving a heavy fire 
in return. Snelling maintained his ground till the Amer- 
ican force came up in line of battle, though within pistol 
shot of the British works and the bullets were falling like 
hail around him and his little company. As our first line 
advanced, it received the fire from most of the front ranks 
of the enemy, which was returned with spirit. The British 
troops with their brother savages then set up a yell, rushed 
from behind their works, and the fight became severe and gen- 
eral. In a moment silence prevailed in our ranks, broken 
by the discharge of a six pounder. This carried dismay 
among the savages ; but nearly became disastrous to us, as 
frightened by the noise, Col. Miller's horse began to rear 
and plunge and finally threw his rider. All thought him 
killed, and the Indians ran forward to take his scalp, but 
were repulsed. The Colonel soon remounted and continued 
to cheer on his men to the encounter. A second discharge 
of grape from the six-pounder broke the line of the enemy 
and the troops fled in disorder. Tecumseh and his Indians 
were so sure of victory, that they were in advance of the 
British lines, and were driven back only at the point of the 



30 

bayonet. Seeing the British troops fleeing down the river 
in disorder, Tecumseh and his Indians fled westerly into the 
wilderness. The retreating and routed enemy were hotly 
pursued, Tecumseh till he was lost sight of in the dense 
woods, and Muer to the shore of Lake Erie, where he 
took to his boats and returned to Maiden with the greatest 
precipitation. Thus ended the battle of Brownstown, giv- 
ing confidence to the Americans and disheartening the Brit- 
ish and their savage allies. Caring for the dead and 
wounded, the little army returned to Detroit. Gen. Harrison 
observed, in his report, " that the detachment led by that 
brave officer, Colonel Miller, did not exceed three hundred 
and fifty men ; and, it is very certain, that they defeated two 
hundred British regulars, one hundred and fifty militia men 
and four or five hundred Indians." 

Gen. Hull thinking his position on the Canada shore un- 
tenable, hastily retreated across the Detroit River, soon fol- 
lowed by the British General Brock, with a force superior 
in numbers, but composed mainly of militia and Indians. 

On the 14th of Aug., Gen. Brock erected his batteries op- 
posite Detroit, and the next day commenced cannonading the 
town. The following (Jay his army crossed the river, and 
meeting with no resistance marched directly forward to as- 
sault the fort. The Americans, in high spirits and confident 
of success, were prepared to meet him. What was their 
disappointment and chagrin to see suvhiteflag run out from 
the wall, in token of submission. The army, and with it 
the Territory of Michigan, was surrendered to the British. 
The officers and soldiers were filled with indignation, and 
in fact the whole people of the country, at this cowardly or 
traitorous surrender. Upon the surrender of Detroit, Col. 
Miller, under date of August 27, 1812, thus wrote : " When 
I last wrote you my feelings were very different from what 
they are now. I thought things appeared prosperous and 
flattering ; I considered we had a sufficient force to break 
down all opposition, and I still think had we done as we 
ought, we could have carried conquest to a very considerable 
extent. But, alas ! times are now altered. We are now all 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 31 

prisoners of war." ****.*,« Only one week since 
I, with six hundred men, completely conquered almost the 
whole force which they then had, but now they came and 
took Fort' Detroit and made nearly two thousand prisoners, 
on Sunday the 16th inst. There being no operations going 
on against them below us, gave them an opportunity to re- 
enforce. The number they brought against us is unknown, 
but my humble opinion is we could have defeated them 
without a doubt, had we attempted it, but Gen. Hull 
thought differently and surrendered." 

Gen. Hull, in his report of the surrender, says : " Before 
I close this dispatch it is a duty I owe to my respectable 
associates in command, Colonel Mc Arthur, Findlay, and 
Cass, and Lieutenant Colonel Miller, to express my obliga- 
tions to them for the prompt and judicious manner they 
have performed their respective duties. If aught has taken 
place during the campaign which is honorable to the army, 
these officers are entitled to a large share of it. If the last 
act should be disapproved, no part of the censure belongs 
to them." * 

But disaster followed disaster. An army of regulars 
and militia was posted at Lewiston on the northern frontier 
of New York. It was commanded by General Yan Rens- 
selaer of the militia of that state, and was intended for the 
invasion of Canada by the way of Queenstown, a fortified 
British fort opposite Lewiston. On the 13th of October, 
Gen. Yan Rensselaer crossed the river and commenced the 
assault. At first he was successful, but the enemy being 
reenforced and the militia refusing to cross the river, the 
British gained a complete victory. Of one thousand men 
crossing into Canada, but very few escaped. 

Gen. Yan Rensselaer retired from the army. His suc- 
cessor, Alexander Smith, of Yirginia, in command of the 
army of the Centre, did little else than promise to plant the 
American standard in Canada. On the 28th of November 



; He might well say this, for all of these officers begged of him not to surrender, and 
told him they could hold the Fort against all the forces the enemy could bring against 
them. Col. Cass and Lieut. Col. Miller were particularly indignant at Hull's course. 



32 adjutant-general's report. 

and the first of December, attempts were made to cross 
into Canada, but the troops did not come to time, councils 
of war were held and the attempts abandoned, and the pro- 
ject was a failure. 

Gen. Dearborn was in command of the army of the North, 
in camp at Greenbush and Plattsburg, N. Y. Little was 
accomplished in this quarter. A detachment marched from 
Plattsburg into Canada, surprised a party of British and In- 
dians and destroyed a considerable amount of military 
stores.* 

Thus the campaign of 1812 ended in discomfiture and 
disgrace. But while disaster followed our arms upon the 
land, upon the ocean our gallant little navy won victory 
upon victory, and established our superiority in naval war- 
fare. 

In the fall of 1812, Governor Plumer made a requisition 
upon the government for one thousand stand of arms. The 
requisition was answered, and on the 18th of November, 
the Commissary General acknowledged their reception at 
the Arsenal at Portsmouth. 

The 18th of November the legislature assembled at Con- 
cord, and Governor Plumer by message communicated to 
that body his action through the preceding summer and 
recommended such measures for their consideration as he 
thought the public good demanded. His action in order- 
ing out detachments of our militia at the request of the 
President was thought reprehensible by some, particularly 
as he ordered out the detachments without consulting the 
Council. The Governor in his Message went into an elab- 
orate argument to sustain his action, closing with the fol- 
lowing " summing up " which includes a quiet allusion to 
the fact of his not having consulted the Council in the mat- 
ter, — " Believing " said the Governor " that the President 
was in fact, Commander-in-Chief of the militia of the sev- 
eral States, and judge of the time when it was necessary 
to order them out, as soon as I received requisitions from 
General Dearborn, without consulting ivith flesh and blood, 

* Hale's History United States. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 33 

I promptly issued orders for calling into the service such 
portions of the detached militia as were required." He 
complimented Adjutant-General McClary, and Brigadier 
Generals Storer, Robinson, and Montgomery, for the prompt- 
ness and fidelity with which they executed his orders, rec- 
ommended that the Legislature should make additional pro- 
vision for the detached militia, and should require the 
several towns to provide " gunpowder, balls and flints, to be 
ready for use in any emergency," and to make some other 
alterations in the militia laws of minor importance. 

The Governor's message was received with favor by the 
majority of the Legislature, and this favor was pointedly 
shown in their answer to the message. " It is," said their 
answer, " the opinion of this House, that this nation had 
just cause of war against Great Britain, at the time our 
government declared it. ' The American blood which one 
bf her officers shed in our own waters, and for which no sat- 
sfaction has been made ' is a sufficient cause for war. * * * 
The impressment of our citizens into her naval service is also 
just cause for war. * * * The House of Representatives 
tre not disposed to palliate any of the aggressions which 
he Emperor of France, that scourge of nations, has in- 
licted upon the United States ; and we feel assured from 
ntimations given in the President's late message to Con- 
gress, that should the war continue longer or shorter, 
10 alliance will be formed with that power which has 
>roved destructive to the liberties of the people, wherever 
Ler arms have reached. We, Sir, would duly appreciate 
he correct conduct of your Excellency, for having promptly 
sued orders for calling into the service such portions of 
the militia ' of this State ' as were requested ' by the 
resident of the United States, agreeably to ' the laws of 
ongress of April 10, 1812.' We deem it a great un- 
appiness that different sentiments and opposite conduct 
revails in any part of the Union. If the constitution does 
ot empower Congress to enact laws for the purpose of de- 
iching certain portions of the militia, and to authorize the 
resident to call them into actual service when they are 
3 



34 adjutant-general's report. 

needed, and if his requisitions be not obligatory on the 
Governors of the several states, we are in a deplorable sit- 
uation indeed, and one very important end, for which it has 
been thought by many the constitution was adopted, is en- 
tirely lost to the nation. It is to be lamented that different 
and opposing sentiments on this very important subject 
should have been practically brought into collision when 
the nation is in a state of war." 

There was a large and respectable minority, however, 
who did not subscribe to the sentiments of this answer. 

They exercised their constitutional right of entering their 
protest upon the Journal of the House. In this protest 
they say : " We dissent entirely from the general sentiments 
contained in the answer, in relation to the policy of the 
present war. * * * We do not deem this war to have 
been necessary, because we do not believe that ' all hopes 
of securing our rights by friendly negotiation had ceased.' 
We do not believe the war to have been expedient, because 
the nation was not adequately prepared for such an event. 

* * * The answer echoes certain sentiments in regard 
to the power of the President over the militia of the State, 
to which we cannot assent. * * ■ * In respect to the 
power of the President to call out the militia, it is, in the 
first place, exceedingly clear that he cannot compel them 
to go out of the United States, because all the occasions or 
events in which he is authorized to call for the militia must 
happen within the United States. * * * If any cit- 
izen of this State, therefore, should be forced to bear arms 
beyond the limits of his country, we should deem it a gross 
violation of the rights secured to him, as well by the con- 
stitution of the United States as of this State. In the next 
place, we hold the State authorities not only at liberty, but 
bound, to inquire, whether that constitutional exigency has 
arisen which makes it their duty to place the militia of the 
State beyond their own control and under martial law. 

* * * Is the President entitled to call forth the whole 
militia of the states, and put himself or his lieutenant at 
their head, whenever he shall say that a belief of the ex- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 35 

istence of a constitutional exigency reposes in his own 
breast ? This is the true and real question. If the affirm- 
ative be maintained, then our militia is in effect a standing 
army, liable at any time to be marched to any place, and to 
perform any service the President may require. We do 
not say that such a power, if it did exist, would be observed, 
but we do say, that it is wholly inconsistent with the prin- 
ciples and spirit of the constitution to repose such a power 
in the hands of the Chief Magistrate." 

But however opposite the opinions of the majority and 
minority, they differed little in principle, the principle that 
the State, every part of it, must be defended against the 
attacks of the enemy at all hazards, with all our military 
force if necessary ; and these manifestoes of the majority 
and minority seem rather like the badges upon the uniforms 
of military men, to show to what corps of troops their 
wearers are attached. 

Meantime the patriotism of the people was completely 
aroused, and, notwithstanding the heavy draft of three 
thousand five hundred men made from the militia of New- 
lampshire, extensive enlistments in privateersmen, and in 
the regular army, volunteering on the part of our men 
went on apace. 

" The District of New-Hampshire, for recruiting," was 
under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Moody Bedel, 
who had orders to recruit seven companies. His rendez- 
vous was at Concord, where he established himself May 8, 
1812. Between that date and the 16th of September, he 
recruited 397 men, and marched them to Burlington. These 
recruits were for the 11th Regiment of U. S. Infantry, of 
which he was Lieutenant-Colonel. It was fully organized 
n the winter of 1812 and 1813, and in June, 1813, the 
egimental and company rolls were nearly as follows. We 
*ive the rolls because the regiment was mainly from this 
State : 



36 adjutant-general's report. 

*Roll of Field and Staff Officers of the 11th U. S. 

Infantry. 
flsaac Clark, Colonel. 

Moody Bedel, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Timothy Upham, Major. 

Newman S. Clark, Adjutant. 

Richard Bean, 1st Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 

Henry J. Blake, 2d Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 

Walter Sheldon, 2d Lieutenant and Paymaster. 

Jonathan W. Shaw, Surgeon. 

James Stark, Surgeon's Mate. 

John Gale, Surgeon's Mate. 

John Ladd, Surgeon's Mate. 

Theodore Gould, Sergeant-Major. 

James Goodhue, Quartermaster-Sergeant. 

Joseph C. Merrit, Paymaster's Assistant. 
JRoyal Jackman, Chief Musician. 

Adin Carey, Chief Musician. 

*It is much to be regretted that the rolls of the officers and soldiers of the War of 
1812-15 are in such a loose and mixed state. There has been great difficulty in obtain- 
ing the rolls, and when obtained they Lave usually been in such shape as to require 
much labor and great attention in arranging them, and it is feared that even now they 
may not be perfect in arrangement. 

f Col. Clark was from "Vermont. He was one of those officers who owed their ap- 
pointment to influence of friends, rather than to merit. Although he may have been 
a man highly qualified for the walks of civil life, he had no qualifications or love 
for the life of a soldier. He had neither the knowledge or skill to command his regi- 
ment on parade or in the field, or the executive ability to take charge of the same 
while in camp. As a consequence, his duties devolved upon his Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Majors. It was well for the reputation of " the bloody 11th," that in those officers 
he had men who knew their duty, and, knowing it, performed it. As it was, there was 
no regiment in the northern army that was before it in all the essentials that go to form 
" a fighting regiment;" tall and robust men, efficiency in drill, and cool and deter- 
mined courage in action. After continuing in command of the regiment until the 
summer of 1813, but seldom with his regiment, Col. Clark retired front the service, and 
the regiment was consolidated, during the fall of 1813, with Col. Ripley's regiment 
from the District of Maine. Subsequently, upon the filling up of the two regiments, 
Col. Campbell took command of the 11th Regiment, a man who well knew his duty, 
and who fell near Street's Bridge at the commencement of the battle of Chippewa, 
July 5, 1814. 

t Royal Jackman was of Canterbury. His skill with the drum, and astonishing dex- 
terity with " the sticks," keeping one in the air while its fellow was continuing its duty 
in producing correct and excellent music, must be well recollected by many men (then 
boys) within the limits of the 11th and 38th regiments. 



military history of new-hampshire. 37 

Pay Roll op Capt. John McNeil, Jr.'s Company. 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


*John McNiel, jr., Captain 


July 


1 1813 


Aug. 31,1813 


Paid on individual account. 


Valentine Goodrich, 1st Lt 




(t 


" 


Trans, to Capt. Gordon's Co. 


Henry J. Blake, 2d Lieut. 




" 


ti 


Q. M. 11th Regt. Infantry. 


David Crawford, 3d " 




" 


" 


On furlough. 


Rufus Bucklin, 3d " 




tt 


11 


Absent, sick. 


Timothy Aldrich, Ensign, 




" 


" 




Horace Morris, " 




lt 


it 




Joseph E. Merit, " 




11 


It 




Thomas Dickey, Sergeant, 




" 


ti 




Hazen Bedel, " 




a 


" 




Salmon C. Palmer, " 




11 


" 




Stephen Howard, " 




" 


li 




David Pratt, " 




" 


(( 




Henry Jones, " 




" 


" 




Henry Eastman, " 




" 


ti 




Reuben Hyde, " 


May 


1 


li 




Augustus Bowers, " 


Mar. 


1 


il 




Isaac B. David, " 






a 


No date to enlistm't entr'd. 


Jesse Marshall , Corporal, 


July 


1 


" 




Henry Ferguson, " 




" 


" 




Wm, Livermore, " 




" 


" 




John Shattuck, " 




" 


" 




Calvin Stewart, " 




a 


n 




Abraham Doolittle, " 




" 


it 




Peter Hildreth, " 




ct 


it 




Bradley French, " 


Jan. 


1 


11 




Elijah Branch, " 


May 


1 


" 




Thomas Smith, Musician, 


July 


1 


" 




David Small, " 


Mar. 


1 




Dead, date unknown. 


Dwigbt Marsh, " 


July 


1 


" 




Russell Myrick, " 




" 


" 




Jason Marsh, " 




<« 


" 




Allen Smith, " 




" 


(( 




PRIVATES. 










Samuel Ames, 


July 


1, 1813 


Aug. 31,1813 




Wells Ames, 




" 




rransferred to 4th Regt. 


Rufus Austin, 




" 


a 




Isaac Baldwin, 




" 


" 




Lotan Bartlett, 




" 


a 




Thomas Bentley, 




it 


" 




John Blake, 




" 


a 




Joseph Burke, 




" 




Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Caleb Briggs, 




" 


lc 




Benjamin Butcher, 




" 




Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


John Burgin, jr. 




tt 


a 




Isaac Brown, 


Mar. 


1 


■ 


Dead, date unknown. 


Jacob Barker, 


July 


1 


tt 




Orison Brink, 


May 


1 


" 




Solomon K. Burbank, 


July 


1 


" 





*Capt. McNeil was of Hillsborough (see Vol. II. 1866, page 118). He raised a com- 
pany in Hillsborough and vicinity, and marched the same to Concord. He was a 
powerful man, "being six feet six in his stockings," well proportioned, and weighing 
250 pounds. Arrived in Concord, he could lind no quarters fjM- his men, and was forced 
to march them to East Concord for quarters for the night. 4r/ s company there quar- 
tered at the tavern of Isaac Emery, Esq. Emery was a Republican, and one Aaron 
Austin kept the opposition tavern in the same village. In the evening some of the 
opposition collected together, with Austin at their head, and got into an altercation 
with the soldiers in Emery's bar-room. From words they came to blows. At this 
juncture, Capt. McNeil appeared in the room, and seeing Austin busy in the melee, 
seized him and threw him out of an open window upon the green. The rest of the 
party, seeing the feat so easily performed, did not wait a repetition of it, but left the 
soldiers alone in their quarters. 



38 adjutant-general's report. 

Pay Roll op Capt. McNeil's Company — continued. 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


Orlean Bell, 


July 


1, 1813 


Aug. 13, 1813 




Phineas Bacon, 




" 


" 




Joseph Butler, 




" 


•' 




Daniel Blandon, 




" 


" 




Thomas Baines, 




" 


a 




John Blanehard, 


June 


26 




Died July 18, 1813. 


David Benson, 


May 


1 


" 




James Bur ley, 


July 


1 


a 




Hazen Burbank, 




" 


" 




Oliver Bugby, 




" 


(t 




Frederick Burnham, 




" 


" 




Chester Carpenter, 




" 


" 




Samuel Caswell, 




" 


" 




Joseph Chapman, 


Nov. 


1, 1812 


" 




Caleb Currier, 


July 


1, 1813 


a 




Jesse Case, 




" 


" 




Martin L. Crandall, 




" 


" 




Samuel A. Craig, 


May 


9 


it 




Ezekiel Clough, 


July 


1 


Aug. 17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Henry Carpenter, 




" 


31 




John Clute, 




" 


" 




Eben'r Carlton, 




" 


" 




Alex'r Chase, 




" 


it 




Elias Coombs, 




" 


a 




Zebulon Caswell, 




" 


" 




Daniel Cross, 




" 


17 


Discharged. 


James Cummings, 




it 


31 




Lewis Charles, 




" 


" 




Guy ( ' ark, 




" 




Dead, date unknown. 


James Chase, 




" 


" 


Discharged Aug. 8, 1813. 


Benj. Davis, 




" 


31 




Jonath. Dow, 




" 


" 




Henry Dodge, 


June 22 


" 




Silas Sutton, 


July 


1 


July 26 


Discharged Julv 27, 1813. 


Phineas Davenport, 






Aug. 18 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Samuel Daniel, 






17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Abner Davis, 






31 




David Dickey, 






31 




Oliver Darby, 






Julv 17 


Discharged July 18, 1813. 


Jacob L. Eaton, 






Aug. 31 




Ezra Eaton, 






31 




Calvin Ed son, 






17 


Discharged Aug. 18. 1813. 


Ethan P. Eddy, 






31 




Phineas Fogg, 






17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


John Fox. 






31 




Nicholas Trimmer, 






" 




Nathan Fitch, 






" 




Aaron Foster, 






" 




Gardner Foster, 






u 




Joshua Graves, 






27 


Discharged Aug. 28, 1813. 


Moses Glazier, 






31 




Morris German, 






17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


John Goodwin, 






31 




Francis Grandau, 










Samuel Gibson, 










Jonathan Goff, 










Richard Griffin, 










Benjamin Hall, 










Peter Hamilton, 


May 


1 


31 




Nathaniel Hoit, 


July 


1 






Ebenezer Hubbard, 




" 






Benj. Howe, 




it 






Joseph Haskell, 




" 






Samuel Hearly, 




c« 






Martin Hatch, 




" 






John Harriman, 




" 






Charles Howes, 




a 






Stephen Howard, jr. 




n 


17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Timothy B. Henderson, 




a 


31 




George Hyde, 




" 






Benj . Holly, 


May 


1 







MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE 39 

Pay Roll op Capt. McNeil's Company — continued. 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Hudson, 


July 


1,1813 


Aug. 17, 1813 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


John Holmes, 


May 


1 


31 




Williard Huntoon, 




" 


" 




Neb. em i ah Houghton, 


July 


1 


" 




Uriah Higgins, 




24 


" 




Alexander Jones, 


May 


1 


" 




Simeon Jones, 


July 


1 


" 




Wm. H. Judd, 




" 


11 




Cyrus Knapp, 




" 


** 




William Keyes, 




" 


" 




Sylvan us Lamed, 




" 


** 




Isaac Littlehale, 




n 


" 




Ephraim Leonard, 




" 


** 




Roswell Loveland, 




" 


" 




John Lamphire, 




" 


" 




Levi Lane, 




" 


u 




John Lovel, 




" 


n 




Alfred Leonard, 




" 


" 




Thomas Lethbridge, 




" 


" 




Benj. Lynde, 






u 


No date to enlistm'tenter'e 1 


Daniel Lee, 


Aug. 


14 


" 




Samuel Linsey, 


July 


1 


tt 




Samuel Loveland, 




tt 


tt 




James Marsters, 




" 


tt 




William Moody, 




" 


tl 




Elihu Mott, 




" 


li 




Moses B. Morrison, 




<< 


a 




Thomas Marstin, 




<< 




Deserted Aug. 28, 1813. 


Stephen Maynard, 




u 


17 


Discharged Aug. 58, 1S13. 


Jonathan B. Merritt, 




a 


31 


Prisoner of war. 


Elisha Martindale, 




" 


" 




Truman McGee, 


June 


1 


" 


Prisoner of war. 


David McKnight, 


May 


1 


" 




James McNight, 




" 


" 




James McNight, jr. 




" 


July 8 


Died July 9, 1813. 


Ellis Maxham, 


Jan. 


1 


Aug. 31 




David Moody, 


July 


1 






Ebenezer Mudge, 


May 


1 


" 




John W. Moore, 




" 




Absent, never joined. 


Joseph Manor, 


July 


1 


*t 




Asa McNamarra, 




it 


tt 




Jonath. Nichols, 




" 


'< 




Stephen Nesmith, 




" 


" 




James Nesmith, 




" 




Deserted previous to last in- 


John Newton, 




it 


" 


spection. 


Josiah Nichols, 




a 


a 




Ebenezer Orn, 




" 


tt 




David Pratt, jr. 




" 


tt 




Kobert Purple, 




tt 


" 




John Pierce, 




it 


17 


Discharged August 18, 1813. 


Francis Pilkey, 




a 


" 


Discharged August 18, 1813. 


Shadrach Place, 




" 


31 




Augustus Place, 




" 


" 




Sandford Place, 
John Palmer, 




t' t 


17 
31 


Discharged August IS, 1813. 


James Perkins, 




a 






Ezra Porter, 




tt 


u 




John Parker, 




" 


" 




Alpheus Paul, 


Jan. 


22 


tt 




Henry Perry, 


July 


1 


a 




William Phillips, 




» 


n 




Daniel Richardson, 




" 


a 




Jonas Richardson, 




" 


a 




Samuel Race, 




" 


n 




Benj. Roe, 


May 


1 


a 


Prisoner of war. 


William Reed, 


July 


1 


ti 




Francis Rock, 




tt 


n 




Daniel Richardson, 




" 


tt 




Ezekiel Rogers, 




" 


] 


deserted. 


Aaron Rumsey, 




tt 






Alexander Reynolds, 




tt 


] 


Deserted. 



40 



adjutant-general's report. 



Pay Roll op Capt. McNeil's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


From 


when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


Robert H. Robertson, 


July 


1, 1813 


Aug. 17, 1813 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Isaac Robertson, 




" 


31 




Josiab Richardson, 




" 


" 




Asa Russell, 




" 


" 




Sterling Sargent, 




n 


a 




John D. Small, 




" 


" 




Edward Small, 




a 


(t 




Samuel Small, 




" 


" 




Bantield Scott, 




" 


" 




Zuinticus Skinner, 




" 


" 




James Staples, 




" 


it 




John Stanley, 




" 


" 




Stephen Sherman, 




" 


it 




Billey Stearns, 




" 


" 




Henry Skinner, 




" 


" 




Nathan Stearns, 


May 


12 


" 


Prisoner of war. 


Jacob Sperry, 




" 


" 




John Swain, 


July 


1 


" 




Samuel G. Summer, 




" 


17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Jeremiah Sprague, 


Mar. 


1 


31 




Hazael Shaw, 


July 


1 


" 




Jotham Stebbins, 




a 


" 




Ambrose Lerrette, 




" 


" 




Abel Stearns, 


July 


1 


31 




Elam Simons, 




" 


" 




Abel Steele, 


May 


1 


a 




Reuben Stevens, 


June 


8 


a 


Discharged. 


Gideon Thomas, 


July 


1 


ti 




Loran Temple, 


May 


1 


" 




John Thompson, 1st, 


April 


7 


" 




Horace B. Tower, 


July 


1 


" 




William Town, 




" 


" 




John Thompson, 2d, 








Deserted. 


Daniel Atley, 


July 


1 


17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Isaac Whitcomb, 




" 


31 




Moses T. Willard, 




" 


" 




Benj. Woodbury, 




" 


" 




Levi Whitmore, 




" 


n 




Philander Wood, 




" 


17 


Discharged Aug. 18, 1813. 


Oliver Wright, 




" 


31 


Prisoner of war. 


Eph'm Wood, 




" 


" 




John Wood, 




it 


" 




Benj. Wood, 




a 


" 




Samuel Wilber, 




" 


" 




Cato Williams, 


May 


1 


a 




Abiather Witherell, 


July 


1 


a 




Harrison B. Warner, 




" 




Deserted. 


William C. Wait, 




'• 


a 




Silas Whitney, 




" 


it 




George Warren, 




" 




Deserted July 16, 1813. 


Simeon Warner, 




it 


a 




Joseph Weed, 




" 


" 




John Whitney, 




« 


a 




Salem Wheelock, 




" 


tt 




Uriah Wright. 




" 


« 


Hospital steward. 


Abraham Fuller v Sergeant, 




" 


" 


Absent on command. 


Calvin Aldrich, ji\ 




" 


" 




John Prince, 




" 


ti 




David Larned, 




" 


a 




Joseph Dunkin, 




it 




Discharged. 


Eben'r Green, 




" 


a 




Sam'l Cleveland, 




(( 


a 




Jacob Allard, 


June 


1 


" 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 41 

Roll of Capt. John W. Weeks's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


*John W. Weeks, Captain, 


Mar. 12, 1813 






Richard Bean, 1st Lieut. 


12 




On detachment. 


James Green, 2d Lieut. 


12 






F. A. Sawyer, Ensign, 


12 






Ben]. Stevenson, Sergeant, 


June 1, 1812 


5 years 




William Smith, " 


May 18 


* " 




Daniel Bailey, " 


Sept. 28 


" 




Amaziah Knights, " 


June 8 


" 




Elisha B. Greene, " 


Jan. 18, 1813 


" 




Win, W. Bailey, Corporal, 


May 22 


a 


Reduced to the ranks, May 


Peter Gambsly, " 


June 12 


a 


18, 1813. 


Obed S. Hatcli, " 


May 23, 1812 


" 




Josiah Reed, " 


June 6 


" 




Ben.j. Wilson, " 


June 9 


" 




Robert Hoskins, " 


Sept. 30 


2 years 




Alva Smith, Musician, 


Aug. 20 


5 years 


At Burlington, Vt., trans- 


Orrin R. Dexter, " 


Oct. 29 


2 years 


ferred. 


Silas Whitney, " 


May 23 


5 years 




Solomon B. Clark, " 


Mar. 24, 1813 


During war 




PRIVATES. 








Henry Alden, 








Samuel Abbott, 


Feb. 10, 1813 


1 year 




Thomas Alverson, 


April 2 


5 years 




Daniel Bennett, 


July 3, 1812 


" 




Zerah Bennett, 


June 12 


" 




John Brown, 


Sept. 3 


2 years 




Chester Bennett, 


June 19 


5 years 


Absent, sick. 


Hazen Burbank, 


May 23 


" 


At Burlington.] 


Daniel Burbank, 


Aug. 17 


it 




Stephen Bullard, 


Jan. 19, 1813 


2 years 




Benj. T. Baker, 


Aug. 22, 1812 


" 




Ebenezer Ball, 


Aug. 28 


5 years 




Thomas Brigham, 


Mar. 26, 1813 


2 years 




Bad Beacher, 


10 


" 




John Burns, 


3 


During war 




John Burgin, 2d, 


3 




Sick at Lancaster, N. H., 


John Bickford, 


Feb. 13 


2 years 


transferred, paid 3 months 


Nathaniel Bennett, 


Apr. 17 


During war 


in advance from enlist- 


John Brainard, 


Mar. 10 


1 year 


ment. 


Sebulon Carter, 


June 20, 1812 


5 years 


Detached as a marine on 


Stephen Chase, 


Oct. 1 


" 


Lake Champlain. 


Levi H. Christian, 


Aug. 23 


1 year 




Seth Clark, 


June 15 


6 months 




iVinthrop Collins, 


Sept. 29 


5 years 




John Collins, 


Sept. 29 


" 




luy Clark, 


Jan. 13, 1813 


it 




Jere Clough, 


Jan. 9 


During war 




jharles Collins, 


Feb. 27 


5 years 





Capt. John W. Weeks was from Lancaster. He was the son of John and Deborah 
Brackett) Weeks, and was born in Greenland in 1799. He was bv trade a house-car- 
enter, and carried on that business prior to the war of 1812. In that war he raised a 
ompany of men and was commissioned as its Captain in June, 1812. He was attached 
o the llth U. S. Infantry, and his company had the right of the regiment at the battle 
f Chippewa,, and the honor of first repeating the command of its Major in that noted 
ank movement, that so quickly broke the British column by its deadly fire. Capt' 
Veeks was brevetted for gallant service in this battle, and commissioned as Major at 
close of the war. He was one of the Commissioners to run the boundary line be- 
wixt Maine and New-Hampshire, aiid was Treasurer of Coos County from 1818 to 

22, and Sheriff of the same from June, 1819, to June, 1824. He was elected to the State 
enate in 1827, and again in 1828. He was elected to Congress as Representative in 
829, and served two years. Major Weeks was a man of marked character and great 

fiuence in his county. He died in 1853, aged 74 years. 



42 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Weeks's Company — continued. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Feb. 22, 1813 


2 years 


Sick at Burlington, Vt., 


22 


5 years 


transferred- 


Mar. 13 


During war 




Feb. 9 


" 




10 


5 years 




May 23, 1812 


" 




July 12 


" 


Deserted Apr. 20, 1813, from 


Feb. 22, 1813 
18 
10 


18 mont is 


Burlington, Vt. 


« 




25 


5 years 




Mar. 9 


" 




Sept. 27, 1812 


6 months 




Jan. 29, 1813 


" 


Confined at Lancaster, X. 


Mar. 27 


18 months 


H., and transferred. 


9 


During war 




8 


" 


Deserted Mav 26, 1813. 


Feb. 26 
20 
Aug. 19, 1812 




Died April 17, 1813. 


18 months 




Feb. 11 


During war 




Jan. 28, 1813 


18 months 




Jan. 22 


" 




June 26, 1812 


a 


Claimed by the Marine 


May 25 


it 


corps on Lake Ontario, 


17 


5 years 


June 15, 1813. 


Aug. 14 


" 




May 23 


a 




Jan. 30, 1813 


6 months 




12 


5 years 




18 


18 months 




27 


5 years 




19 


18 months 




Feb. 6 


During war 


Died Mav 2, 1813. 


23 
27 


18 mouths 


Died May 6, 1813. 


8 
Mav 17, 1812 


5 years 




Mar. 10, 1813 


18 months 




Jan. 18 


" 




Aug. 29, 1812 


" 




Feb. 12, 1813 

16 
July 18 


" 


Sick at Burlington. 


« 




Sept. 29 

1 

July 22 


5 years 








Sept. 13 


18 months 




Feb. 3 


" 




3 


a 




15 


During war 




11 


5 years 




July 4, 1812 


18 months 




Jan. 31, 1813 


" 




Aug. 26, 1812 


5 years 


Died at Burlington. Mav 23, 


Jane 1 


" 


1813. 


Aug. 19 


18 months 




June 10 


5 years 




Oct. 28 


"" 




29 


18 months 




Feb. 25, 1S13 


During war 


Deserted May 26, 1813, from 


28 


5 years 


Burlington. 


May 18, 1812 






Jan. 25, 1813 


it 




Mar. 1 


" 




Jan. 1 


During war 


Absent without leave. 


Dec. 26, 1812 


18 months 




June 17 


5 years 




Mav 16 


' " 




July 4 


" 




Oct. 29 


18 months 





Moses Cooper, 
Sylvanus Currier, 
Otis Chaffee. 
Samuel Abraige, 
Benj. Cross, 
Phineas Davenport, 
Eliphet Day, 
John Dodge, 
Moses Davis, 
Eli Davenport, 
Luimer Dodge, 
John English, 
James French, 
Luther Fuller, 
Jer'h Faller, 
Joel Farnham, 
John French, 
Timothy Fuller, 
Lemuel Fuller, 
Abner Gay, 
Wells Goodwin, 
Samuel Gotham, 
Robert Gotham, 
Samuel Henry, 
John Holmes 
Neh. Houghton, 
Willard Huntoon, 
Alpheus Hutchins, 
Joseph Henderson, 
James Harvey, 
Sheldon Holbrook, 
Henry Hall, 
J dm Hicks, 
John M. Holmes, 
Daniel Holmes, 
Greenleaf Huntoon, 
Geo. Huntoon, 
Warren Cassin, 
Joshua Knapp, 
Peter Labare, 
Joseph Labare, 
Samuel Linsey, 
Geo. W. Lucas, 
Jacob Mclntire, 
James Mellen, 
Harry Moore, 
Shephard Morse, 
Ebenezer Mudge, 
Jucob B. Moore, 
John W. Moore, 
William Merriam, 
Nathaniel Moore, 
James Nesbit, 
Stephen Orr, 
Daniel Perkins, 
James Perkins, 
Theodore Philips, 
Benoni Potter, 
Orange Pixley, 
Caleb Prouty, 
Daniel Pinkham, 
Levi Pratt. 
Albert Rathbone, 
Anthony C. Readfield, 
Abram Rogers, 
Martin Ray, 
Geo. Shirland, 
Edmund Sanborn, 
John Sanford, 
John Shirley, 
Job Smith, 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 43 

Roll of Capt. Week's Company — concluded. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



For what time, 



Remarks. 



Luther Southworth, 
Elihu Spencer, 
Jacob Sperry, 
James B. Stanley, 
Joshua Stephens, 
Abram Sanborn, 
Reuben Stevens, 
David Stodard, 
John C. Swain, 
Israel Sanderson, 
Daniel Stratton, 
Jacob Trussell, 
Daniel Utley, 
Samuel Vanschork, 
Jere Wheeler, 
Barney B. Whipple, 
James Whitney, 
Jeremiah White, 
Jotham Wilkins, 
John Wilkinson, 
Absalon Wilson, 
John Wilson, 
James Witherell, 
John R. Wyatt, 
John M. Williams, 
Joseph Weed, 
Allen White, 
Andrew Woods, 
Thomas Whitton, 
&eo. Warren, 
Simson Warren, 
Josiah Washburn, 
Robert H. Robertson, 
Alexander Jones, 
Peter Hamilton, 
Jedediah Robinson, 
Samuel Wright, 
Samuel Stackpole, 



Nov. 5, 1812 
Sept. 2 
June 12 
Jan. 30, 1813 

26 

2-1 
9 

19 

27 
3. 

12 

27, 



Mar. 



Sept. 



1812 



Mar 
Aug 
Oct. 
Aug 
July 11 
May 20 
Aug. 17 
19 
July 9 
June 13 
Oct. 30 
May 15 



1813 
19, 1812 
29 
19 



Dec 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

April 2 

Feb. 21 

April 4 

July 6, 1812 



21 

5, 1813 
26, 1812 

9, 1813 
19 



5 years 

18 months 

During war 

5 years 

During war 

5 years 
During war 
18 months 

5 years 

18 months 
5 years 



18 months 
5 years 

During war 

5 years 
18 months 



During war 



Jan. 1, 1813 18 months 



Died May 26, 1813, at Bur. 
lington, Vt. 

Sick at Unity, N. H. 



Sick at Westminster, Vt. 



Sick at Burlington, Vt. 



Sick at Burlington, Vt. 
Sick at Burlington, Vt. 

Discharged May 28, 1813. 



44 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Beeman, Jr.'s, Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Jos. Beeman, jr., Capt. 


Mar. 


12, 1812 


5 years 




V. K. Goodrich, 1st Lt. 




" 


" 




Dan'l Crawford, 2d Lt. 


May 


8 


" 




Thos. Gwake, Ensign, 


Mar. 


12 


" 




Eobert Austin, Sergeant, 


June 


29 


" 




Migs Guy, 




2 


" 




Howard Stephen, " 




22 


« 




John Hooper, 




19 


a 




William Blake, " 


July 


4 


" 




Ansel Burge, 




1 


(( 




Salmon C. Palmer, Corp. 


June 


2 


it 




Joel Tucker, 




22 


18 months 




Samuel Storey, 


July 


8 


5 years 




Elizhab Hoyt, 




6 


" 




Jacob Baker, Eifer, 


June 


10 


a 




Nath'l Parker, Drummer, 




18 


" 




PRIVATES. 










Joseph M. Butler, 


June 


3, 1812 


5 years 




EYederick Burnham, 




19 


" 




John Bisell, jr. 




9 


(C 




Orson Brink, 




25 


18 months 




Reuben Brown, 




23 


" 




Joseph Clark, 




2 


5 yea^s 




Elijah Chapman, 
Bates W. Chittenden, 




10 


18 months 






6 


5 years 




Richard Estus, 




8 


" 




Edward Carey, 




2 


it 




Amasa Eollett, 




8 


" 




John Foss, 




18 


« 




Zebulon Hubbard, 




13 


" 




Stephen Howard, jr. 




23 


u 




Peter Jameson, 




18 


a 




John Lampher, 




24 


(i 




Asahel Lyon, 




22 


18 months 




Robert Miller, 




8 


5 months 




John Martin, jr. 




23 


18 months 




Timothy Burdick, 
James Collary, 


July 


15 


5 years 






4 


" 




Nathaniel Ereshet, 




25 


18 months 




Ansel Salearan, 




4 


5 years 




David Older, 




11 


* a 




Amos Squire, 




11 


" 




Stephen Berry, 




3 


18 months 




Bradish Watson, 




23 


5 years 




Joseph Webber, 




26 


" 





military history of new-hampshire. 
Roll of Capt. George Howard's Company. 



45 



Names. 


When enlisted 


For what time 


Remarks. 


George Howard, Capt. 


Mar. 12, 1812 






Henry Dyer, 1st Lieut. 


" 






John G. Munn, Ensign, 


<< 






Samuel Holcomb, Sergt. 


May 28 


5 years 




Horace Filer, " 


25 


" 




Joseph Dudley, " 


26 


" 




Eliphalet R. Hunt, " 


21 


18 months 




Abel Stubbed, " 


30 


5 years 




Horace Hambleton, " 


20 


' 41 




Peter Flandreau, " 


30 


" 




Selah Barnard, Corporal, 


20 


18 months 




Charles Goodsell, " 


20 


5 years 




Lewis Odell, " 


June 6 


" 




Horace Stocking, " 


24 


" 




PRIVATES. 








James Brown, 


May 21, 1812 


5 years 




Elisha Button, 


26 


18 months 




Jacob Brooks, 


June 11 


5 years 




Joseph Booth, 


May 26 


" 




Joel Cook, 


22 


" 




Stephen Cobb, 


29 


" 




Alma Chapman, 


June 8 


" 




Isaac Derve, 


May 20 


" 




Asa Doud, 


June 1 


" 




Walter Downs, 


17 


it 




James Ellsworth, 


Mav 22 


" 




Henry Evans, 


28 


18 months 




Nathan Foot, 


20 


5 years 




George Flandreau, 


30 


" 




Josiah Goodrich, 


22 


18 months 




[saac Gilbert, 


June 26 


5 years 




Joseph Gorham, 


12 


" 




Pliney Holcomb, 


16 


ti 




Warren Holcomb, 


May 15 


18 months 




David P. C. Hathaway, 


30 


5 years 




Levi Hall, 


June 28 


" 




Stephen Hunt, 


29 


18 months 




Andrew Hendrich, 


30 


5 years 




Wm. Johnson, 


May 25 


" 




John Johnson, 


June 13 


" 




Joseph Knapp, 


15 


■« 




Abraham Kinney, 


17 


" 




Stephen Knapp, 


20 


" 




David Lines, 


15 


a 




A r m. Lockwood, 


30 


" 




ilisha Miner, 


20 


" 




3rideon Morehouse, 


6 


" 




John W. Morris, 


13 


18 months 




Joseph Nichols, 


16 


5 years 




Jliver Olds, 


May 21 


" 




Jbadiah Olds. 


June 6 


a 




jyndes Pettibone, 


17 


18 months 




lohn S. Perry, 


May 23 


5 years 




Slisha Pierce, 


18 


18 months 




VEunson Peck, 


June 3 


5 years 




\llen Rising, 


May 29 


< ; 




Sath. Swan, 


27 


a 




Arnold Stafford, 


June 30 


" 




vVarren Smith, 


3 


" 




Anthony Spinks, 


17 


" 




Fames Slawson, 


29 


" 




ferny Ste])hens, 


May 28 


" 




ibn'r Tripp, 


20 


" 




lohn Wall, 


June 25 


" 




•ianstbrd Whitney, 


30 


" 




reorge Weaver, 


17 


" 





46 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll op Capt. Samuel H. Holley's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. For what time. 


Samuel H. Holley, Captain, 


Mar. 12,1812 




Rufus Hatch, 1st Lieut. 


" 




Walter Sheldon, 2d Lieut. 


" 




Charles Bachus, Sergeant, 


May 16 


5 years 


M. de Lafayette Rogers, Sgt. 


28 


" 


Enoch Cooper, Sergeant, 


June 1 


tt 


Leonard Howes, " 


" 


" 


Philo Perry. •« 


May 29 


" 


Isaac Clark, jr. " 


June 5 


a 


Isaiah Goodno, " 


2 


" 


John Reed, " 


22 


" 


Adin Cady, Fifer, 


May 26 


" 


Alpheus Spicer, Drummer, 


June 15 


" 


PRIVATES. 






Nathaniel Parker, 


June 18, 1812 


5 years 


Samuel Axtill, 


2 


" 


David Blanchard, 


4 


" 


Simon Blanchard, 


2 


u 


David Benson, jr. 


June 9 


a 


John Bell, 


May 16 


it 


Jonathan Belding, jr. 


June 3 


it 


James Ellis, 


23 


a 


Moses Emerson, 


20 


a 


Odel Flemming, 


18 


" 


Edward Green, 


May 27 


" 


Ebenezer Green, 


26 


u 


James Gormans, 


June 18 


" 


Rufus Humphreys, 


22 


" 


Benjamin Holley, jr. 


June 17 


18 months 


Ezra Hamlin, 


4 


5 years 


Nathaniel B. Haryey, 


23 


"" 


Marcus D. Hewit, 


3 


" 


Joseph Hudson, 


4 


" 


William H. Judd, 


30 


18 months 


Jonathan Lawrence, 


15 


5 years 


Jonathan Mosier, 


2 


" 


Amos S. Mills, 


17 


" 


Thomas Miles, 


3 


u 


Ellis Maxham, 


2 


li- 


Daniel Mason, 


8 


lt 


Amasa Owen, 






John Powers, 


May 29 


It 


Jonathan N. Palmer, 


June 5 


" 


John Prew, 


25 


" 


Davis Prieu, 


29 


" 


Titus Richardson, 


17 


18 months 


Russell P. Rogers, 


1 


5 years 


Ezekiel Rogers, 


27 


" 


Aaron Ramsey, 


32 


u 


Druses Shumway, 


3 


a 


Eliakim Sprague, 


6 


11 


Horatio Sprague, 


8 


18 months 


Jeremiah Sprague, 


2 


5 years 


Samuel G. Sumner, 


6 


" 


Artemas Tyler, 


2 


" 


John B Tyler, 


5 


•< 


Horace B. Tower, 


16 


a 


Jason Thayer, 


3 


11 


Nahum Tiittle, 


May 26 


" 


Thomas Wood, 


June 17 


18 months 


Cato Williams, 


May 24 


5 years * 


Abiather Wheeler, 


June 16 


" 


Caleb A. Wilton, 


23 


" 



Remarks. 



military history of new-hampshire. 47 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Griswold's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Griswold, Capt. 






Absent on recruiting ser- 


Wm. S. Foster, IstLt. 


Mar. 12, 1812 




vice. 


James Wells, 2d Lt. 


" 




Absent on rect'g service. 


Ezekiel Jewett, Ensign, 


ee 




Absent on rect'g service. 


Joseph Hopkins, Sergt. 


May 25 


5 years 


Absent on rect'g service. 


Warren Sautwell, " 


June 11 


u 


Absent on rect'g service. 


Jeremiah Kimball, " 


May 18 


a 




Wm. Livermore, Corp. 


19 


<( 




Jas. McLane, Drummer, 


18 


u 




PRIVATES. 






* 


Benj. Barker, 


June 10, 1812 


5 years 




Nathaniel Boutwell, 


11 


" 




Wm. C. Belding, 


May 18 


" 




Stephen Cummings> 


June 17 


" 




aaines Cresson, 


3 


« 




Samuel Daniels, 


May 15 


u 




Rhineas Fogg, 


22 


" 


Not mustered, absent on 


Rufus Graves, 


20 


11 


duty. 


Wm. B. Herrick, 


20 


ec 




James Hiries, 


June 4 


« 




David T. Hopkins, 


3 


ti 


Absent recruiting, not 


Lewis Hastings, 


May 19 


" 


yet mustered. 


Joel Jones, 


June 11 


u 




Daniel Mixter, 


May 18 


" 




?eter Mason, 


June 24 


18 months 




STathan Puffer, 


May 27 


5 years 


At Fort Constitution, 


Reuben Pain, 


22 


a 


Great Island. 


Jacob Reed, 


30 


ti 




Samuel Rice, 


15 


u 




Wm. Smith, 2d, 


June 3 


« 




Nathaniel Winslow, 


15 


u 




3benezer Watson, 


May 26 


" 


[absent on duty. 


Thomas Barnes, 


June 27 


(I 


Not yet mustered, being 


Timothy Barnard, 


25 


(I 


" " " 



48 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Samuel Gordons' Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Samuel Gordon, Captain, 


Mar. 26, 1812 






Rufus Buckland, 2d Lieut. 


26 






Thomas Stamford, Ensign, 


Oct. 12 






Reuben C. Hyde, Sergeant, 


June' 5 


5 years 




Augustus Powers, " 


May 5 


" 




Perry S. Sandford, " 


8 


" 




James Goodhue, " 


June 11 


" 




Benjamin Tozer, " 


May 29 


" 




Elijah Branch, Corporal, 


27 


a 




Elial Bond, " 


June 6 


a 




Bern. Rogers, " 


9 


a 


Died April 20, 1813. 


Mason Young, " 


6 


" 




Oliver Emerson, " 


May 28 


" 


Absent on command. 


David Hartshorn. " 


June 24 


" 




Horatio Emmons, " 


Mar. 14, 1813 


" 




Prentiss Coats, Drummer, 


Aug. 10, 18 .2 


" 




Isaac Wright, Fifer, 


July 4 


" 




Jarvis Hanks, Drummer, 


Mar. 31, 1813 


Close of war 




PRIVATES. 








John Ballard, 


May 29, 1812 


5 years 




Isaac Brown, 


Sept. 23 


18 months 




Oliver Bugbey, 


23 


" 


Absent on command. 


John Bishop, 


May 20 


5 years 




Charles Bell, 


Mar. 25, 1813 


Close of war 




Orlean Bell, 


Feb. 8 


5 years 




James Bashford, 


Mar. 29 


Close of war 




Ebenezer Brown, 


Feb. 17 


5 years 




David W. Bates, 


Mar. 8 


Close of war 




David Benson, 


April 14 


5 years 




Josiah Conner, 


Feb. 11 


Close of war 




John Collins, 


12 


" 


Died March 23, 1813. 


Samuel Corliss, 


Mar. 30 


5 years 




Alex. Chase, 


11 


" 




Daniel S. Cushman, 


25 


" 




Elias Coombs, 


29 


" 




Thomas Davis, 


Julv 4. 1812 


" 




Joel Den smore, 


Sept. 21 


18 months 




Silas Dutton, 


Aug. 22 


" 


Absent with leave. 


Asa Edmonds, 


Mar. 25, 1813 


Close of war 




Jacob Eaton, 


Feb. 2' 


5 years 




George Forbes, 


Oct. 21, 1812 


" " 




John Fish, 


Mar. 11, 1813 


" 




David Fuller, 


April 7 


Close of war 




Reuben Gideons, 


May 25, 1812 


5 years 




P. B. Goodrich, 


June 22 


" On command. 


Samuel E. Godfrey, 


July 29 


" Confined in Vermont State 


Samuel Gibson, 


Feb. 8, 1813 


Close of war 


Prison for three years. 


Thomas Goodwin, 


Mar. 15 


5 years 




Jonathan Goff, 


29 






Hezekiah Golf, 


29 


" 




Abner Glines, 


14 


Close of war 




Martin Glines, 


14 


" 




Uriah Higgins, 


April 24 


" 




John Herriman, 


Jan. 21 


5 years 




Asa Hill, 


April 14 


Close of war 




John Herri ck, 


Mar. 22 


5 years 




John Hunt, 


10 


" 




Abraham Hobhs, 


16 


Close of war 




Simeon Herrick, 


15 


5 years 




Eri Howe, 


6 


Close of war 




Moses Heath, 


Feb. 12 


<< 


On command. 


Wm. L. Heath, 


11 


<< 




Jeremiah Heath, 


11 


<< 




Peter Heath, 


11 


" 




George Jaunee, 


May 27. 1812 


5 years Died March 23, 1813. 


Francis Tet'ts, 


June 29 


" '• 


Sheldon Lockwood, 


May 26 


u 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



49 



Roll of Oapt. Gordon's Company — concluded. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



For what time Residence and Remarks. 



Alfred Leonard, 
Silas Lovell, 
John Lovell, 
Benjamin Lynde, 
Calvin S. Miller, 
Stephen Maynard, 
Guy Morgan, . 
Wm. P. Morey, 
John Mosher, 
John Martin, 
Jonathan B. Merritt, 
John W. Mighell, 
David McCoy, 
Joseph Needham, 
William Newman, 
Erastus Norton, 
Mo.ses Nichols, 
Stephen Northrop, 
Daniel Noyes, 
Elisba Plumb, 
Ezra Porter, 
George Pelsue, 
Sylvester Pond, 
Benj. M. Parks, 
John Parker, 
Ira Remmington, 
George Roberts, 
Asa Russell, 
Russell S. Robinson, 
Joseph Richardson, 
Moses Smedley, 
Elam Simon, 
Samuel Stevens, 
Levi Stevens, 
Joseph Snow, 
Franklin Spencer, 
Jobn Thompson, 
James Thompson, 
David White, 
Philander Wood, 
Potter Wvght, 
Uriah Wfight, 
Simeon Wood, 
Cephas White, 
Simeon Warner, 
Jonathan Ward, 
Daniel Ward, 
Omer Washburn, 
William Warner, 
Oliver Wright, 
Jacob Wheeler, 



June 

Sept. 

Feb. 

April 

July 

June 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

April 

Mar. 

April 

June 

Sept. 

June 

April 

Mar. 

Mar. 

June 

June 

Aug. 

June 

April 

Mar. 

May 

June 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

July 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

April 

Mar. 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

May 



22 
28 
13 

2 

28 
27 

8 '13 
22 

9 

2 
18 
13 
25 
28 
29 

2 
31 
10 
23 
30 
22 
16 



'12 



April 5 '13 

April 7 

Mar. 24 

Mar. 22 

Mar. 22 

Mar. 29 

Mar. 31 

April 13 



5 years 

n 

close of war 

5 years 

close of war 

5 years 



2 years 6 mos, 

5 years 

18 months 

5 years 

close of war 



5 years 
it 

a 

close of war 
5 years 

close of war 

5 years 
close of war 



5 years 
close of war 

5 years 



close of war 



Deserted from Wallingford 
before he joined. 



On command. 



50 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Phinehas Williams' Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


For what time 


Residence and Remarks. 


Phinehas Williams, Capt 


March 12 '12 




Dismissed from the arm 


Malachi Corning, IstLt. 


March 12 




May 27, 1813. 


Abel Farwell, 2d Lt. 


March 12 






Hernias S. Clark, Ensign, 


March 12 




Adjutant 11th Regimes 


Eufus T. Lillie, Serg. 


July 6 


5 years 


Infantry. 


Henry Minar, " 


May 28 


18 months 




Abner Eaton, " 


Jan. 9 '13 


a, 


Discharged June 9, 181c 


Elijah Packard, " 


March 26 


During war 




Benj. Putnam, " 


Sept. 7 '12 


18 months 




Ira Butler, " 


March 17 '13 


During war 


Prisoner of war. 


Josiah Clark, Corporal, 


June 6 '12 


5 years 




Bela Sprague, " 
Benj. Child, 


June 9 


" 




May 27 


18 months 


Died May 30, 1813. 


Wm. Humphrey, " 


Sept. 11 


5 years 




Henry S. Wait, " 


June 10 


" 




Wm. Messenger, " 


July 10 


a 




Aaron Gardner, Music'n, 


June 2 


18 months 




Dexter Dimmock, " 


June 18 


" 




PRIVATES. 








Daniel Bagley, 


July 4 


u 




Henry Bentley, 


June 8 


5 years 


Absent, sick. 


Richard Boynton, 


June 25 


" 




Job Barnet, 


Jan. 29 '13 


18 months 


Absent, sick. 


Alfred Barrell, 


July 4 '12 


" 




Timothy Bradford, 


March 23 '13 


During war 




Benj. Brown, 


July 11 


5 ^ears 




Thomas Clark, 


Oct. 3 '12 


" 


Absent without leave. 


John Clark, 


May 27 


18 months 




John Cummins, 


Sept. 27 


" 


Mustered for discharge. 


Reuben Clough, 


Sept. 30 


5 years 




William Currier, 


Oct. 2 


18 months 




Aaron Crandall, 


Aug. 31 '12 


" 




William Cheeney, 


March 30 '13 


During war 




William R. Call, 


March 18 


" 




Isaac Churchill, 


March 27 


5 years 




George Dean, 


Sept. 1 '12 


18 months 




Joseph Dodge, 


March 15 '13 


During war 




Peter Darling, 


Sept. 27 '12 


5 years 




George Fuller, 


June 6 '12 


" 




Wilson Fisher, 


June 28 


tt 




Nathan Gould, 


Sept. 2 


18 months 




Oliver Galusha, 


Sept. 27 


" 




Peter Goodrich, 


Aug. 17 


5 years 




Joel Greeley, 


Jan. 29 '13 


18 months 




John Guptil, 


March 26 


During war 




Abbot Gould, 


Feb. 1 


" 




William Harvey, 


July 19 '12 


5 years 


Prisoner of war. 


Ira Houghton, 


May 27 


u 




Israel Houghton, 


Feb. 12 '13 


During war 




Asa Hopkins, 


March 13 


5 years 




Seth Ingraham, « 


June 27 '12 


" 




Abraham Jackson, « 


June 27 '13 


18 months 




Tohn Johnson, 


March 29 


During war 




3arnabas Keith, 


Feb. 20 


5 years 




isa Kinney, « 


Jan. 15 '13| 


18 months 








MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 51 

Roll of Capt. Williams' Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Roswell Lampher, 


Dec. 22 '12 


18 months 




Charles Lampher, 


Aug. 31 


« 




Shubael Lampher, 


Feb. 2 '13 


During war 




Zerlina Logan, 


Feb. 12 


a 




William (illegible), 


Aug. 24 '12 


5 years 




Eliphalet Maxfield, 


Sept. 18 


18 months 




John Mc Cloud, 


June 7 


5 years 


Died June 19, 1813. 


Samuel Millan, 


Sept. 11 


18 months 




Moses McPherson, 


Jan. 27 '13 


a 




Love Maxfield, 


March 26 


During war 




Anthony Miller, 


March 5 


u 




Benj. H. Ordway, 


Jan. 14 


18 months 




Joseph Patterson, 


Sept. 2 '12 


" 




Thomas Perkins, 


July 13 


5 years 




Ahoyer (1) Perkins, 


March 20 '13 


During war 




William Plaisted, 


Feb. 13 


5 years 




John Proctor, 


April 23 


During war 




Jonathan C. Parker, 


March 3 


a 




Ebenezer Rogers, 


Sept. 27 


18 months 




ELosea Remington, 


Aug. 21 


a 




Jonathan Remington, 


Aug. 21 


" 




James Rich, 


April 13 


During war 




Martin Rogers, 


March 19 


5 years 




Warren Ransom, 


March 3 


" 




James Shriens, (?) 


June 14 '12 


tt 




Lemuel Spooner, 


Mav 30 


a 




James Stow, 


July 11 


18 months 




Abel Sanderson, 


June 19 


" 




Ezra Smith, 


July 11 


a 




Samuel Sparling, 


Sept. 27 


" 


Absent without leave. 


Senj. Silver, 


July 16 


a 


Transferred to Capt. Ed- 


Stover H. Shaw, 


June 13 


5 years 


gerton's Co., April 30, 


[saac Spooner, 


Feb. 12 


18 months 


1813. 


John Taylor, 


Aug. 31 


" 


Absent without leave. 


James Tarbell, 


Feb. 13 


" 




William . Vaughan, 


Feb. 20 






Jesse White, 


June 9 


During war 




Cornelius White, 


June 9 


18 months 




Jacob Willes, 


Sept. 30 


5 years 




Austin Willey, 


Sept. 28 


18 months 




Henry T. Wheeler, 


Aug. 31 


5 years 




Nathan Woodbury, 


Sept. 3 


18 months 




William West, 


Feb. 10 '13 


" 




Nathan West, 


Feb. 20 


During war 




David White, 


Feb. 28 


18 months 




Benjamin White, 


Feb. 28 


During war 




Caleb Willard, 


April 2 


« 




Roland Wright, 


April 2 


u 




Joseph P. Clark, 


Sept. 11 


5 years 




Isaac Collier, 


June 9 


18 months 


Discharged May 28, 1813. 


Hezekiah Havens, 


April 15 


During war 




Jethro Smith, Corporal, 


Oct. 1 '12 


5 years 


Joined May 1, 1813. 



52 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



Roll of Lieut. V. R. Goodrich's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks 


V. R. Goodrich, 1st Lieut. 


March 12 '12 




On command at Sacket 


David Crawford, 2d Lieut. 


May 8 




Harbor. 


Rufus Buckland, Jr. " 






Absent, sick. 


Horace Morris, Ensign, 


Dec. 2 






Zalmon C. Palmer, Sergt. 


June 2 


5 years 




Stephen Howard, " 


22 


" 




Reuben Hyde, " 


15 


" 


Absent, sick. 


Augustus Powers, " 


May 25 


" 


Absent, sick. 


Henry Jones, " 


March 10 '13 


During war 




William Livermore, Corp. 


May 17 '12 


5 years 




John Shattuck, " 


Feb. 15 '13 


" 




Elijah Branch, " 


May 27 '12 


" 


Absent, sick. 


Calvin Stev/art, " 


July 7 '12 


it 




Russell Myrick, Musician, 


Feb. 18 '13 


" 




D wight Marsh, " 


12 


" 




Jason Marsh, " 


27 


18 months 


Beating bass drum. Sup< 


Allen Smith, " 


May 20 '12 


5 years 


nunierary. 


PRIVATES. 








Rufus Austin, 


Oct. 19 '12 


18 months 


On command in the navy 


John Burgin, 


Mar. 3 '13 


During war 




Isaac Brown, 


Sept. 23 '12 


5 years 


Absent, sick. 


Jacob Baker, 


June 16 


" 




Orison Brink, 


22 


" 


On command in the navy 


Solomon D. Burbank, 


Feb. 20 '13 


18 months 




Orlean Bell, 


10 


" 




Phineas E. Baker, 


17 


" 




Joseph M. Butler, 


June 3 '12 


5 years 




Daniel Blandon, 


Jan. 18 '13 


" 




John Blanchard, 


March 26 


During war 




John Ballard, 


May 29 '12 


5 years 


On command in the navy 


David Benson, Jr. 


June 9 


" 




James Burley, 


Feb. 20 '13 


During war 




Hazen Burbank, 


May 25 '12 


5 years 




Oliver Bugbey, 


Sept. 21 '12 


18 months 




Thomas Barnes, 


June 27 


5 years 




Frederick Burnham, 


9 


" 




Barnard Converse, 


March 1 '13 


« 




Martin L. Crandall, 


Feb. 20 


During war 




Samuel A. Craig, 


9 


5 years 




Ezekiel Clough, 


Jan. 26 


" 




Henry Carpenter, 


Feb. 4 


a 




John Clute, 
Eben'r Carlton, 


12 


" 




Aug. 30 '12 






Alex'r Chase, 


March 11 '13 


" 




Elias Coombs, 


29 


" 




Zebulon Caswell, 


June 20 '12 






Daniel Cross, 


Feb. 13 '13 




Deserted from Eagle Sloe 


James Cummings, 


June 5 '12 






Lewis Charles, 


5 


u 




Guy Clark, 


Jan. 13 '13 


« 




James Chase, 


June 19 '12 






Silas Dutton, 


Aug. 22 


18 months 


Died May 27, 1813. 


Phineas Davenport, 


May 23 


5 years 




Samuel Daniels, 


15 


" 




Joseph Dunkins, 


Feb. 22 '13 


it 




Abner Davis, 


March 10 '13 


During war 




David Dickey, 


Aug. 30 '12 


18 months 




Oliver Darby, 


Feb. 27 '13 


5 years 




Jacob F. Eaton, 


2 


it 


Sick in hospital. 


Ezra Eastman, 


June 24 '12 


it 




Calvin Edson, 


March 25 '13 


a 




Phineas Fogg, 
Ethan P. Edson, 


20 


ti 




22 


it 




John Fox, 


April 3 '12 


During war 


(Two names illegible.) 






Nahum Fitch, 


Feb. 1 '13 


5 years 




Moses Glazier, 


March 2 


ii 




John Goodwin, 


March 4 


<< 


Mustered for discharge, t 


Morris German, 


Feb. 18 


K 


ing deaf. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 53 

Roll of Lieut. Goodrich's Company — continued. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Francis Granaan, 


Feb. 18 


'13 


5 years 




Joseph Granaan, 


18 




" 


Deserted about the last of 


Samuel Gibson, 


8 




During war 


May, 1813. 


Jonathan Goff, 


March 29 




5 years 




Eichard Griffin, 


Jan. 2 




During war 




Eben'r Green, 


May 26 


'12 


5 years 




Samuel Heartley, 


Feb. 27 


'13 


' ; 




Martin Hatch, 


March 18 




<( 




John Heriman, 


Jan. 21 




(< 




Charles Howes, 


27 




18 months 




Stephen Howard, jr. 


June 23 


'12 


5 years 


Mustered for discharge; in- 


Timothy B. Henderson, 


Feb. 5 


'13 


" 


firmity and want of size. 


George Hyde, 


March 6 




«( 




Benj. Hull ey, jr. 


June 7 


'12 


18 months 


Absent, sick. 


Joseph Hudson, 


4 




5 years 


Absent, sikc. 


John Holmes, 


May 25 




" 


Absent, sick. 


Willard Huntoon, 


Aug. 14 




a 


Absent, sick. 


Nehemiah Houghton, 


May 17 




«c 




Uriah Higgins, 


April 24 


'13 


During war 


Sick, at Charlotte. 


Simeon Jones, 


Sept. 1 


'12 


18 months 


Mustered for discharge ; old 


William H. Judd, 


June 30 




" 


age. 


Cyrus Knapp, 


Feb. 8 


'13 


(< 


William Keyes, 


March 29 




5 years 




Ephraim Leonard, 


June 15 


'12 


18 months 




Roswell Loveland, 


Feb. 11 


'13 


" 




John Lampher, 


June 24 


'12 


5 years 




Levi Lane, 


Feb. 19 


'13 


" 




John Lovel, 


13 




" 




Alfred Leonard, 


June 22 


'12 


" 




Alfred Leonard, 


6 




« 




Daniel Lee, 


May 24 


'13 


«' 




Samuel Linsey, 


Feb. 12 




During war 




Samuel W. Loveland, 


Jan. 11 




5 years 




Stephen Maynard, 


June 28 


'12 


" 




Jonathan Merrit, 


April 2 


'13 


<( 




Elisha Martindale, 


Jan. 19 




« 




Truman McGee, 


March 1 




« 




David McKnight, 


Feb. 27 




During war 




James McKnight, 


27 




18 months 




James McKnight, Jr. 


27 




a 




Ellis Maxham, 


June 23 


'12 


18 months 




David Moody, 


Feb. 11 


'13 


5 years 




Eben'r Mudge, 


Sept. 13 


'12 


" 




John W. Moore, 


Feb. 3 


'13 


18 months 




Joseph Manor, 


Oct. 11 


'12 






Asa McNamarra, 


April 1 


'13 


<< 




John Newton, 


June 30 


'12 


5 years 




Josiah Nichols, 


Feb. 28 


'13 


" 




Eben'r Orn, 


Oct. 10 


'12 


During war 




Francis Pilkey, 


June 12 




5 years 




Shadrach Place, 


March 3 


'13 


" 




Augustus Place, 


22 




During war 




Sandford Place, . 


22 




" 




John Palmer, 


Sept. 19 


'12 


tt 




James Perkins, 


June 9 




18 months 




Ezra Porter, 


30 




5 years 




John Parker, 


March 29 


'13 


<< 




Ali>heus Paul, 


22 




" 




Henry Parry, 


Feb. 10 




18 months 




William Philipps, 


Sept. 29 




" 




William Reed, 


March 11 


'13 


" 




Francis Rook, 


Feb. 8 




5 years 




Daniel Richardson, 


March 19 




During war 




Ezekiel Rogers, 


June 27 


'12 


5 years 




Aaron Ramsey, 


22 




a 




Alex Reynolds, 


Feb. 7 


'13 


a 




Robert H. Robinson, 


July 6 


'12 


18 months 




Isaac Robinson, 


Sept. 30 








Josiah Richardson, 


Feb. 27 


'13 


5 years 




Asa Russell, . 


10 




During war 




Henry Skinner, 


March 11 




5 years 


On command in the navy. 



54 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Lieut. Goodrich's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Nathan Stearns, 


Feb. 12 


'13 


During war 


On command in the navy. 


Jacob Sperry, 


June 12 


'12 


5 years 




John C. Swain, 


March 17 


'13 


a 




Sam'l G. Sumner, 


June 6 


'12 


a 




Jeremiah Sprague, 


2 




" 




Hazael Shaw, 


Aug. 2 




18 months 




Jotham Stebbins, 


Feb. 25 


'13 


5 years 




Ambrose Levett, 


Jan. 19 




" 




Abel Stearns, 


March 3 


'13 


" 




Elam Simmons, 


July 21 


'12 


" 




Abel Steele, 


Jan. 13 


'13 


18 months 




Reuben Stephens, 


March 8 




During war 




John Thompson, 1st, 


April 7 




" 




Horace B. Tower, 


June 16 


'12 


5 years 


Absent with leave. 


John Thompson, 2d, 


Jan. 12 


'13 


" 


Deserted June 25. 


William Town, 


March 15 




During war 




Philander Wood, 


Aug. 10 


'12 


5 years 




Oliver Wright, 


April 1 


'13 


During war 




Ephraim Wood, 


Aug 24 


'12 


5 years 




John Wood, 


March 19 


'13 


During war 




Benj. Weed, 1st, 


Feb. 18 




5 years 




Samuel Wilber, 


Aug. 23 


'12 


18 months 




Cato Williams, 


March 17 


'13 


5 years 


On command in the navy. 


Abiatha Witherell, 


Jan. 10 


'13 


<( 


On command aboard the 


Harmon B. Warner, 


Feb. 27 




«« 


Little Bell. 


William C. Wait, 


May 20 


'12 


K 




Silas Whitney, 


April 2 


'13 


(( 




George Warren, 


March 3 




" 




Simeon Warner, 


10 




u 




Joseph Weed, 


Jan. 5 




a 




John Whitney, 


March 2 




u 




Salem Wheelbck, 


Feb. 21 




18 months 




Uriah Wright, 


May 28 


'12 


5 years 




Daniel Utley, 


March 21 


'13 


During war 




Abraham Fuller, 


April 30 




5 years 


Joined June 30. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 55 * 

Roll of Capt. Charles Follett's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


. For what time 


Residence and Remarks. 


Charles Follett, Captain, 


March 26 'Y. 


> 


Resigned June 10, 1813. 


Benj. Smead, 1st Lieut. 


26 






Henry T. Blake, 2d Lieut. 


" 




Transf 'd to Capt. McNeil's 


Berge Ansell, Sergeant, 


July 1 


June 30 '17 


company. 


John Hooper, " 


June 19 


18 


Died June 19, '13; sup'n'y. 


Hiram Hare wood, Sergeant 


May 23 


May 22 


Supernumerary. 


Frederick Tiffany, " 


June 10 


June 9 


Supernumerary. 


Jared Sears, " 


Feb. 22 '1C 


During war 




Nathan Thompson, " 


20 


Feb. 19 '1? 




Samuel Corliss, " 


March 30 


March 29 


Joined from Capt. Gordon's 


Samuel Thompson, " 


Feb. 20 


Feb. 19 


Co. Received no pay 


Ira Dota, Corporal, 


25 


24 


In the navy, by order of 


Thomas Coats, Corporal, 


Sept. 15 '15 


March 14 '14 


Col. Clark. 


Caleb Bailey, " 


Jan. 26 'IS 


Julv 25 




Oliver Pomroy, " 


Feb. 18 


Feb. 17 '18 




Elisha Taylor, " 


March 20 


March 19 




Nath'l Brown, " 


Feb. 8 


During war 




Smith Vethro, " 


" 


. " 


Transferred to Lieut. Com- 


Isaac Bulliss, Musician, 


March 9 


" 


ing's Co., April 30, 1813. 


V. Parmenter, " 


April 2 '13 






PRIYATES. 








Lyman Hull, 


March 27 


During war 




Joseph Marsh, 


Sept. 13 '12 


March 17 '14 




Marshal N. Blasdel, 


April 24 '13 


During war 




John W. Anderson, 


Feb. 17 


" 




Seth Andrews, 


March 18 


March 17 '18 




Simeon Atwater, 


24 


During war 




Joel Bixby, 


Feb. 15 


" 




Jonathan Baker, 


7 


Feb. 6 '18 




Benjamin Blanchard, 


March 9 


During war 




Salmon Brown, 


15 


" 




Warren Brown, 


13 


" 




Ephraim Brown, 


15 


" 




James Brown, 


Jan. 7 


July 6 '14 




Aaron Bissell, 


March 25 


During war 




John Bulliss, 


April 5 


" 


Mustered for discharge, be- 


Joseph Bulliss, 


9 


" 


ing under age and size. 


Timothy Blake, 


Jan. 9 


<< 


Furloughed by Col. Clark. 


Harvey D. Blake, 


8 


" 




Archibald Black, 


March 13 


" 


Mustered for discharge ; in- 


David Black, 


Jan. 11 


July 10 '14 


firmity. 


Stephen Barnard, 


Feb. 9 


Feb. 8 '18 




David Ball, 


March 6 


During war 


Deserted May 19, 1813. 


Leonard Butler, 


11 


March 10 '18 




Jonathan Bailey, 


16 


15 




John Barrett, 


12 


During war 




Daniel Crister, 


Nov. 20 '12 


Nov. 19 '17 




Simeon Cook, 


June 15 


June 14 




Shubael Cook, 


March 30 '13 


During war 




Samuel Couch, 


20 


March 19 '18 




Jarrel Chaffee, 


20 


During war 




Isaac Clark, 


Feb. 15 


Feb. 14 '18 




John Congdon, 


March 27 '13 


March 26 '18 




Martin Cooley, 


27 


During war 




Peter Carvey, 


16 


" 




Rufus Coder, 


Feb. 9 '13 


" 




David Church, 


Sept. 27 '12 


March 26 '14 




George Dennis, 




Feb. 24 '18 




Darling Peter, 




During war 




Benjamin Davis, 


March 18 


March 17 '18 




John Dewey, 


April 6 


April 15 




Daniel Drain, 


Feb. 8 


Feb. 7 




Abiah Eaton, 


22 


During war 


Mustered for discharge ; be- 


Joseph Emery, 


15 


" 


ing infirm. 


Erastus Fling, 


13 


Feb. 12 '18 




Josiah Folsom, 


March 12 


During war 




Sfoah Finch. 


Feb. 5 


Feb. 4 '18 




William Fuller, 


Jan. 22 


Jan. 21 


Deserted June 16, 1863. 


rhomas Farrand, 


March 3 


March 2 




Daniel French, 


Sept. 23 


Sept. 22 '17 




William Fairfield, 


Oct. 1 


30 





*56 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Follett's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


James Food, 


March 17 


12 


March 16 »18 


James Fisher, 


May 23 




May 22 '17 ( In the navy, by order of 


James Fordham, 


Feb. 9 


'13 


Feb. 8 '18 Col. Clark. 


Silent Graves, 


March 22 




During war 


Ephraim Garvin, 


30 




" 


Elislia Griswold, 


Feb. 20 




" 


John Glynn, 


March 3 




" 


Hezekiah Goff, 


29 




March 28 '18 


Joined from Capt. Gordon's 


Jonathan Hunter, 


Feb. 15 




During war 


company, May 1. 


Minard Milliard, 


23 




Feb. 22 '18 




John Harris, 


March 9 




During war 


In the navy, by order of 


Smith Hedden, 


19 




" 


Col. Clark. 


David Hynes, 


11 




March 10 '18 




Sylvester Holdridge, 


17 




16 




Zenos Jones, 


4 




3 




Zenos Jones, Jr. 


10 




9 




(Illegible), 
Nathaniel Hall, 


Feb. 23 




Feb. 22 '18 


Mustered for discharge, be- 


Thomas Low, 


June 6 


'12 


June 5 '17 


ing inlirm. 


Calvin Leavens, 


March 20 


'15 


During war 


Died June 6, 1813. 


Hezekiah Lambert, 


Feb. 20 




Feb. 10 '18 




Ezekiel Leonard, 


March 19 




June 18 




Samuel Lines, 


1 




Feb. 28 




Chilson W. Lackey, 


June 8 


'12 


June 7 '17 




Charles C. Sain, 


May 23 




May 22 




William Marston, 


June 16 




June 15 




Amasa McCoy, 


20 




19 




Daniel McCollum, 


March 16 


'13 






Silas Moses, 


Feb. 26 




During war 




John Moses, 


26 




Feb. 25 '18 




Ibrook Miller, 


14 




" 




Dennis McBride, 


March 22 




Aug. 13 '14 




Jeremiah Martin, 


20 




During war 




David Manchester, 


17 




" 




John Nurse, 


27 




" 




John Oatman, 


June 27 




June 5 '17 




Nathaniel Oliver, 


March 4 




March 3 '18 


Died May 21, 1813. 


Simon Petol, 


Feb. 9 




Feb. 8 




Stephen Punnington, 


20 




19 




Ebenezer Pierce, 


20 




During war 




John S. Post, 


March 27 




March 26 '18 




Simeon Pope, 


April 20 




April 19 




John Rensallaer, 


March 8 




March 7 


Died May 21, 1813. 


John Ross, 


5 




4 




Amos Randal, 


Feb. 7 




During war 




Thomas Robinson, 


March 18 




March 17 '13 




Patrick Roach, 


Feb. 13 


'13 


unknown 


In the navy, by order of 


Elihu Riddle, 


June 5 


'12 


" 


Col. Clark. 


Stephen Rice, 


Jan. 4 


'13 


" 


Sick at Bennington. 


Asa Stiles, 


Feb. 16 




" 




Reuben Stiles, 


18 




a 




Ezra Stiles, 


17 




a 




James Smith, 


22 




(( 




Alpheus Smith, 


March 12 




a 




William Smith, 


April 4 




" 




Solomon Sharp, 


Feb. 2 




" 


Supposed prisoner in Cana- 


Henry Sumrix, 


May 29 


"12 


" 


da. 


Joseph Sumrix, 


Feb. 24 


'13 


it 




Robert Sitertson, 


26 




a 




John Tibbets, 


20 




" 




Francis Thompson, 


March 29 




" 




John Tinney, 


1 




a 




John Titus,' 


April 25 




" 


Furloughed by Col. Clark. 


John Withey, 


March 27 




CC 


In the navy/ bv order of 


Rixford Wittum, 


Feb. 4 




" 


Col. Clark. 


George Whiteman, 


March 8 




" 


Deserted June 2. 1813. 


Jacob Wheeler, 


3 




" 




Lewis Wright, 


April 4 




" 




John Wait, Jr. 


Feb. 8 




« 




Ephraim Walker, 


May 29 


12 


" 




William Hamilton. 


March 30 


13 


" 


Deserted April 30. 1813. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 57 

Roll of Capt. Benj. F. Edgerton's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Benj. S. Edgerton, Capt. 
Horace Hall, 1st Lieut. 


April 4 '12 






13 




Pro. to Capt. Aug. 15, '13. 


Win. S. Heaton, 2d Lieut. 


1 




Promoted Mar. 13, '13, died 


Enoch Cooper, " 


June 20 '13 




Nov. 13, of a wound re- 


Nathan Young, Sergeant, 


27 '12 


18 months 


ceived in action of the 11th 


John P. Burnham, " 


1 


5 years 


Nov. 1813. 


Eben'r W. Bohonon, " 


July 14 


8 months 


Absent, sick. 


Harry B. Webster, " 


June 1 


5 years 




John Chamberlain, " 


March 10 '13 


During war 




Joseph Ohamberlin, jr. Cor. 


June 1 '12 


18 months 




Eben'r White, jr. " 


July 4 


" 




Elisha Sawyer, " 


Oct. 18 


" 




Alden Earns worth, " 


Feb. 10 '13 


5 years 




Alfred Sloan, " 


June 29 '12 


18 months 




John Moody, " 


Feb. 12 '13 


5 years 




Joseph M. Sanborn, Hus'n. 


June 27 '12 


18 months 




Ira Johnson, " 


1 


5 years 


Abset, sick. 


Clement S. Minor, " 


Feb. 8 '13 


" 




Rufus Whitcomb, " 


22 


During war 




PRIVATES. 








Henry Allard, 


9 


During war 




Jacob Allard, 


March 1 


" 




John Arlin, 


Feb. 2 


5 years 




Elijah Bigelow, 


June 2 '12 


18 months 




Aretus Belding, 


15 


" 




William Briggs, 


July 4 


" 


Missing since action of the 


William Burt, 


Sept. 30 


5 years 


11th Nov., 1813. 


Thomas Burks, 


4 


18 months 




Andrew Bradford, 


28 


" 




James Bassett, 


Dec. 31 


5 years 




John Boles, 


30 


18 months 




Solomon Clark, 


May 20 '13 


During war 




Jonathan Clark, 


July 4 '12 


18 months 




Alanson S. Cogswell, 


June 19 


<< 


« it a 


Cheney Coburn, 


Feb. 15 '13 


5 years 




Cyrus Chamberlain, 


June 2 '12 


18 months 




John Collins, 


Sept. 29 '12 


" 




Aaron Cadwell, 


March 21 '13 


During war 


Absent, sick. 


Eben'r Chamberlain, 


17 


" 




George Conant, 


5 


" 




John Dain, 


Nov. 4 'i. 


18 months 




Cushman Downer, 


June 3 


5 years 


Absent, sick. 


John Depau, 


5 


" 


U (i 


Love Dennet, 


March 8 '13 


During war 




Israel Daggett, 


Jan. 15 


5 years 




Joseph Eliery, 


Feb. 12 


'< 




Otis Franklin, 


June 13 '12 


18 months 




John L. Fisher, 


16 


5 years 




Abel Fletcher, 


Sept. 28 


18 months 




Anson Frazier, 


Nov. 26 


<< 




David French, 


June 18 


<< 




Charles Fox, 


March 17 '13 


During war 




James Grimes, 


June 23 '12 


18 months 




Daniel Griffin, 


Jan. 6 '13 


a 




James Griffin, 


2 


During war 




John Green, 


Feb. 15 


5 years 




John Giles, 


March 9 


During war 




John Hall, 


June 3 '12 


18 months 




Moses Hall, 


9 


a 




0. Hall, 


" 


a 


Missing since the action of 


Eleazer Hawes, 


6 


5 years 


Nov. 11., 1813. 


John Hibbard, 


Jan. 18 '13 






Joshua Hyde, 


" 


(< 




Eli Hinds, 


March 12 


<( 




Nathan S. Hinds, 




et 


«< a a 


Samuel Hawkins, 


Feb. 23 


n 




Mansel Hazeltine, 


March 29 


18 months 




David Jewell, 


July 8 '12 






Amos Kyle, 


23 


<( 





58 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



Roll of Capt. Edgerton's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Beals Killicut, 


Feb. 1 


'13 


18 months 




Horatio Lord, 


June 2 


'12 


" 


Missing since the action of 


David Lathe, 


Feb. 11 


'13 


5 years 


Nov. 11, 1813. 


Enoch Little, 


April 7 




During war 




Samuel McMaster, 


June 30 


'12 


18 months 




Calvin Morse, 


March 5 


'13 


During war 




John McMelly, 


10 




" 


Sick at Sackett's Harbor. 


John McMelly, jr. 


23 




" 


Missing since action of the 


Thomas Nash, 


August 8 


'12 


18 months 


11th Nov. 1813. 


John Nichols, 


March 22 


'13 


During war 




Elisha Norton, 


" 




18 months 




Erasmus Osborn, 


July 12 


'12 


" 




Joseph Orn, 


8 




" 


a a a 


Eben'r Orn, 


Oct. 10 




5 years 


a a « 


Amos Phillips, 


Feb. 2 


'13 


18 months 


Sick at Sackett's Harbor. 


James Pingree, 


16 




During war 


Deserted Oct. 1, from Sack- 


Ami R. C. Ransom, 


May 28 


'12 


5 years 


ett's Harbor. 


Samuel Ransom, 


June 1 




" 




Jed'h H. Robertson, 


July 6 




18 months 




Wm, Richardson, 


Feb. 11 


'13 


5 years 




Joel S. Richardson, 


" 




" 




Reuben Strong, 


June 2 


'12 


18 months 




Chas. H. Stacey, 


Feb. 1 


'13 


" 




Aaron Scott, 


11 




5 years 




Nath'l Sias, 


March 4 




a 


Missing since action of the 


Luther L. Stockwell, 


27 




" 


11th Nov. 1813. 


Zebediah Silver, 


29 




During war 




Christopher Silver, 


27 




" 


Sick in the country. 


Putnam Silver, 


Feb. 27 




u 




Benjamin Silver, 


July 9 


'12 


18 months 




Joseph Smith, 


Feb. 18 


'13 


During war 




Levi Smith, 


March 9 




5 years 




Burnice Snow, 


17 




During war 




Obed Snow, 


24 




" 




Jotham Stevens, 


April 5 




n 




Roderick Taylor, 


Jan. 31 




5 years 




Abraham Thayer, 


March 15 




During war 




John Tohn, 


April 7 




" 




Christopher Tohn, 


" 




ii 


Missing since the action of 


Paul Varney, 


March 29 




March 29 


Nov. 11., 8113. 


James Weaver, 


Sept. 11 


'12 


Sept. 26 '12 




Daniel Woodbury, 


29 




29 


a a a 


Samuel Wylie, 


Feb. 13 


'13 


Feb. 13 '13 




Svlvester Washburn, 


April 2 




April 2 




Nicholas C. Wells, 


Feb. 12 




Feb. 12 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



59 



In July, the 11th and 21st Regiments seem to have been 
consolidated — first under the command of Col. Smith, and 
the last of the year under Col. E. W. Ripley. This con- 
solidation was necessary in consequence of the decrease of 
the number of men in the two regiments from death, dis- 
ease, desertion, and other causes ; and accounts, probably, 
for the decrease of the number of companies. Consolidated, 
the following companies seem to have been, for a time at 
least, all that constituted the regiment : 

Roll of Capt. Jonathan Stark's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Jonathan Stark, Captain, 


March 12 '12 






John V. Barron, Ensign, 


May 


15 






3ela Young, Sergeant, 




15 


5 years 




5dm und Day, " 




9 


" 




lazen Harriinan, Sergeant, 


Aug. 


15 


18 months 




saiah Forest, " 


May 


27 


5 years 




William Mitchell, " 




25 


" 


Assisting public store-keep- 


John Knox, " 


Feb. 


27, 1813 


During war 


er. 


John L. Sanborn, " 


July 


11, 1812 


18 months 


Captured on I^ake Cham- 


Josiah Drew, Corporal, 




21 ' 


" 


plain, 3d June, 1813. 


Joseph S. Danforth, " 


Aug. 


27 


" 


Captured on Lake Cham- 


Joseph P. George, " 


March 


1, 1813 


During war 


plain. 


Jenjamin Fisk, " 


May 


15, 1812 


5 years 




Moses Harriinan, " 




23 


18 months 




juther Park, " 


Aug. 


4 


" 


Captured on L. Champlain. 


Tohn Dinsrnore, Musician, 


July 


12 


" 


Sick in Regt'l hospital. 


juther Swan, " 


May 


19 


5 years 




PRIVATES. 










Matthias Avery, 


March 


4, 1813 


During war 


On fatigue in town. 


Shadrach Avery, 




10 


" 




Jacob Avery, 




8 


" 


Sick in Regt'l hospital. 


Jenry Allard, 




22 


" 




benjamin Brown, jr. 


Aug. 


18, 1812 


18 months 




Villiam Bailey, 


June 


12 


" 




Nathaniel Barnard, 




9 


" 




Villiam Burbank, 


May 


21 


" 




Joseph Burnham, 


July 


4 


5 years 


E. duty Cl'k to Adj. 11th. 


Joseph Burgess, 


Feb. 


27, 1813 


" 


Deserted 4th March, 1813. 


Enoch Bickford, 


Jan. 


1 


18 months 




William Bickford, 




2 


" 




[saac Bickford, 




8 


" 




Tosiah Bridges, 




14 


" 


Discharged 14th Aug., 1813. 


Samuel Cook, 


Aug. 


15, 1812 


" 


Sick in hospital, Burlington. 


Thomas Cole, 




26 


" 


Sick in Regt'l hospital. 


John Clone, 




18 


" 


Deserted 1st Sept., 1813. 


Moses Cothiss, 


June 


10 


" 




Dnoch Colby, 


Feb. 


8, 1813 


" 


Deserted 1st March, 1813. 


Samuel Carpenter, 


March 


6 


During war 


On fatigue in town. 


James Cook, 




28 


5 years 




)aniel Collins, 


Feb. 


9 


During war 


Deserted 10th Feb., 1813. 


Nathaniel Cook, 


Jan. 


11 


18 months 




James Drown, 


Aug. 


13, 1812 


" 




Micajah Drown, 




13 


" 




saac Drown, 




13 


a 




laron Drown, 




1 


(t 




Moses Drown, 


Jan. 


13, 1813 


a 





60 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Oapt. Stark's Company — continued. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what ti . e. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Samuel Drown, 


Jan. 1 1813 


18 months 




Benjamin Day, 


May 11, 1812 


5 years 




Thomas Dearborn, 


June 2 


" 




Miles Dolloff, 


May 21 


18 months 


Deserted 30th Aug., 1813. 


Thomas Drew, 


Jan. 6, 1813 


" 




Andrew Durgin, 


4 


u 




Caleb Downing, 


Feb. 11 


5 years 


Deserted 14th April. 1813. 


David Dolloff, 


Jan. 9 


During war 


On board flotilla, Burling- 


Ephraim Douglass, 


Feb. 8 


" 


ton Bay. 


Solomon Davis, 


April 4 


5 years 




Joel Ellis, 


June 30, 1812 


18 months 




Joshua Furbush, 


July 4 


18 months 


Deserted 30th Aug., 1813. 
Captured on Lake Cham- 


Isaac French, 


May 27 


5 years 


Francis Fifictch, 


24 


" 


plain, 13th June, 1813. 


Thomas Foster, 


15 


a 


On command, waiter to Col. 


William Fall, 


March 1, 1813 


a 


Clark, and with him. 


Moses Fall, 


Feb. 12 


During war 


On command, flotilla Bur- 


Stephen Fellows, 


Jan. 20 


" 


lington Bay. 


Abner Gee, 


May 21, 1812 


18 months 




Joseph Godfrey, 


Aug. 8 


" 




Moses Garvin, 


8 


a 




David Gerald, 


March 5, 1813 


" 


Oncommand.Colchester Pt. 


John Glines, 


Feb. 12 


During war 


On command, flotilla Bur- 


James Goodwin, 


20 


" 


lington Bay. 


John Gilman, 


June 26, 1812 


18 months 




Leonard Harriman, 


Aug. 17 


" 


Deserted 30th Aug., 1813. 


Luther Harriman, 


1 


a 




James Hoit, 


May 25 


a 


Ex. duty, G. hospital, Bur- 


Moses Heall, 


March 22, 1813 


5 years 


lington. 


David Hodgdon, 


Feb. 1 


During war 


Sick in Regt'l hospital. 


William Hill, 


March 16 


" 




Lewis Heath, 


Feb. 11 


" 


Deserted August, 1813. 


Edward Higgins, 


10 


18 months 




William Healy, 


Jan. 30 


" 




Joseph Ham, 


2 


5 years 


Deserted 5th March, 1813. 


Nicholas Hodsdon, 


March 28 


" 




John Hunt, 


Sept. 3, 1812 


18 months 


Captured on Lake Champ- 


Henry Jewell, 


Aug. 11 


" 


lain, 3d June, 1813. 


Gilbert Jones, 


Jan. 30, 1813 


" 




John Jewell, 


March 18 


5 years 




John Johnson, 


5 


During war 


Deserted 14th April, 1813. 


Zebulon Johnson, 


11 


18 months 




James Kinnison, 


1 


During war 




John Kinnison, 


1 


5 years 


Sick in Regt'l hospital. 


Pardon King, jr. 


April 3 


During war 




Solomon Liscomb, 


Aug. 7, 1812 


18 months 




Eliphalet Maxfield, 


March 7, 1813 


During war 


On fatigue in Burlington. 


Stephen Maxell, 


Feb. 16 


" 




Eliphalet Maxfield, 3d, 


8 


18 months 


On fatigue in Burlington. 


Caleb Marston, 


25 


During war 


On furlough. 


Francis Mathers, 


March 4 


" 




George Martin, 


Feb. 1 


ti 


Discharged 14th Aug.. 1813. 


Joseph Maxfield, 


8 


18 months 


Discharged 14th Aug., 1813. 


Moses Maxfield, 


10 


" 


Extra duty at hospital. 


Diamond Pearl, 


Aug. 8, 1812 


it 




William M. Parker, 


Oct. 8 


5 years 


On command, flotilla Bur- 


John Perkins, 


March 6, 1813 


During war 


lington Bay. 


David Patch, 


16 


" 




Lemuel Perkins, 


10 


a 




Jonathan Prime, 


3 


a 


On command, flotilla Bur- 


Nathaniel Palmer, 


Jan. 9 


18 months 


lington Bay. 


Jacob Peary, 


7 


" 




John Pearl, 


March 6 


" 




Benjamin Perkins, 


2 


<< 




Stephen Quimby, 


Feb. 8 


« 




Elijah Randall, 


July 4 


18 months 


Discharged Aug. 14. 1813. 


Plenoyer Ray, 


June 10, 1812 


5 years 


Ex. duty assisting P. store- 


David Rumery, 


Jan. 4, 1813 


" 


keeper. 


George W. Sanborn, . 
Enoch Stephenson, 


May 21, 1812 


5 years 




Feb. 25, 1813 


18 months 




Noah Smith, 


Jan. 20 


" 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE 61 

Roll of Capt. Stark's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Nathaniel Sanborn, 


Feb. 25, 


1813 


18 months 


On command, flotilla* Bur- 


Benjamin Seavy, 


9 




" 


lington Bay. 


Benjamin Sanborn, 


Aug. 10, 


1812 


" 


On command, flotilla Bur- 


Hiram Stevens, 


March 9, 


1813 


During war 


lington Bay. 


Daniel Sergeant, 


Jan. 12 




" 




Samuel Standley, 


Feb. 6 




18 months 




Stephen Smith, 


Aug. 15, 


1812 


" 




John Sanders, 


July 21 




c( 




John Sterling, 


Aug. 13 




" 


On piquet guard, Colchester 


Ervine Stearns, 


July 1 




" 


Point. 


Caleb Thompson, 


Aug. 8 




" 




Obediah True, 


March 9, 


1813 


During war 


Sick in Regt'l hospital. 


John Thompson, 


Dec. 29, 


1812 


" 


Sick in Eegt'l hospital. 


Levi Wentworth, 


Aug. 8 




18 months 


Deserted 30th Aug., 1813. 


Thomas Wedge wood, 


Feb. 20, 


1813 


During war 




Robert Willey, 


19 




" 


Deserted 3d March, 1813. 


Stephen Whipple, 


March 4 




« 




Nathaniel Young, 


Aug. 11, 


1812 


5 years 


On command, Quartermas- 


Elijah Young, 


Feb. 23 




During war 


ter-General's Departm't. 



62 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Lieut. Malichi Cornlng's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Malichi Corning, 1st Lieut. 


Mar. 


12 


'12 






Abel Far well, 2d Lieut. 


Mar. 


12 






Resigned. 


Rufus I. Lillie, Sergeant, 


July 


6 




5 years 




Henry Miner, " 


May 


28 




18 months 


On command. 


Elijah Packard, " 


Mar. 


26 


'13 


During war 


[from April 30, 1813. 


Benj. Putnam, " 


Sept. 


7 


'12 


18 months 


Prisoner of war, pay due 


Ira Butler, " 


Mar. 


17 


'13 


During war 


On leave. 


Josiah Clark, Corporal, 


•June 


6 


'12 


5 years 




Bela Sprague, " 




7 




" 




Wm, Humphrey, " 


Sept. 


11 




" 




Jethro Smith, " 


Oct. 


15 




tt 


Nurse in General hospital. 


"Wm. S. Messenger, " 


July 


10 




" 




Aaron Gardner, Musician, 


June 


2 




18 months 




Dexter Dimmock, " 




18 




" 




PRIVATES. 












Daniel Bayley, 


July 


4 




18 months 




Henry Bentley, 


June 


8 




5 years 


Absent, sick. 


Richard Boynton, 




25 




" 




Job Barnett, 


Jan. 


29 


'13 


18 months 




Alfred Barrett, 


July 


4 


'12 


" 




Paul Brewster, 


Mar. 


22 


'13 


During war 




Timothy Bradford, 


Mar. 


23 




" 




Ben,]'. Brown, 


Feb. 


11 




5 years 




Thomas Clark, 


Oct. 


3 


'12 


" 


Deserted Feb. 14, 1813. 


John Clark, 


May 


27 




18 months 




John Cummins, 


Sept. 


27 




" 


Discharged, July 1, 1813. 


Reuben Clough, 


Dec. 


29 




5 years 




"Wm. Currier, 


Oct. 


2 




18 months 




Aaron Crandall, 


Aug. 


31 




" 




"Wm. Cheney, 


Mar. 


3 


'13 


During war 




"Wm. R. Call, 




18 




" 




Isaac Churchill, 




27 




5 years 


Died July 12, 1813. 


Joseph P Clark, 


June 


9 




18 months 




George Dean, 


Sept. 


1 


'12 


" 




Joseph Dodge, 


Mar. 


15 


'13 


During war 




George Fuller, 


June 


6 


'12 


5 years 




"Wilson Fisher, 




28 




" 




Nathan Gould, 


Sept. 


2 




18 months 




Abbot Gould, 


Feb. 


1 


•13 


During war 




Oliver Galusha, 


Sept. 


27 


'12 


18 months 




Peter Goodrich, 


Aug. 


17 




5 years 




Joel Greeley, 
John Guptil, 


Jan. 


29 


'13 


18 months 






26 




During war 


Discharged Aug. 25, 1813. 


"Wm. Harvey, 


June 


19 


'12 


5 years 


Prisoner of war. pay due 


Ira Houghton, 


Mar. 


27 




" 


from April 30, 1813. 


Israel Houghton, 


Feb. 


19 


'13 


During war 




Asa Hopkins, 


Mar. 


13 




5 years 


Discharged June 25, 1813. 


Hezekiah Havens, 


Apr. 


15 




During war 




Seth 1 1 gram, 


June 


27 


'12 


5 years 




Abraham Jackson, 


Jan. 


27 


'13 


18 months 




John Johnson, 


Mar. 


29 




During war 




Barnal>;:s Keith, 


July 


12 




5 years 




Asa Kinney, 


Jan. 


15 




18 months 




Roswell Lampher, 


Dec. 


22 


'12 


" 




Charles Lampher, 


Aug. 


31 




" 




(Three names illegible.) 


June 


17 




5 years 




John McCloud, 


Mar. 


18 




18 months 




Eliphalet Maxtield, 


Jan. 


27 


'13 


" 




Moses McPherson, 


Mar. 


26 




During war 




Love Maxtield, 




5 




" 




Anthony Miller, 


Jan. 


14 




18 months 




Benj. H. Ordway, 




14 




" 




Joseph Patterson, 


Aug. 


2 


'12 


" 


On extra duty rep'g boats. 


Thomas Perkins, 


July 


13 




5 years 


In confinement. 


Eleazer Perkins, 


Mar. 


20 


'13 


During war 




"Wm. Plaisted, 


Feb. 


13 




" 




John Pratt, • 


April 


23 




" 


Discharged Aug. 5, 1813. 


Jonathan C. Parker, 


Mar. 


3 




a 




Ebenezer Rogers, 


Sept. 


27 


'12 


18 months 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 63 

Eoll of Lieut. Corning's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Horace Remington, 


Aug. 


21 


'12 


18 months 




Jonathan Remington, 


April 


13 




" 




James Rich, 


Mar. 


17 


'13 


During war 




Martin Rogers, 


May 


3 




" 




"Warren Renshaw, 


June 


24 


'12 


" 




James Stevens, 


May 


30 




5 years 




Lemuel Spooner, 


Feb. 


11 




" 




James Stow, 


June 


19 




18 months 


Deserted Oct. 20, 1812. 


Abel Sanderson, 


July 


11 




" 




Ezra Smith, 


Sept. 


27 




" 




Samuel Stirling, 


June 


13 




" 


Deserted Feb. 14, 1813. 


Stephen H. Shaw, 


July 


12 


'13 


5 years 


Discharged July 1, 1813. 


Isaac Spooner, 


Aug. 


31 


'12 


18 months 




John Taylor, 


Feb. 


13 


'13 


" 




James Tarbell, 


July 


20 




" 


Discharged July 15, 1813. 


Wm. Vaughn, 








During war 




Zena White, 


June 


7 


'12 


18 months 




(Illegible.) 












Jacob White, 


Aug. 


30 


'12 


18 months 




Austin Willey, 




28 




5 years 


Discharged July 1, 1813. 


Henry T. Wheeler, 




31 




18 months 




Nathan Woodbury, 


April 


3 




" 




William West, 


Feb. 


10 


'13 


During war 




Nathan West, 




20 




18 months 




David White, 




28 




During war 




Benjamin White, 




28 




" 




Caleb Willard, 


April 


2 




" 


Discharged July 1, 1813. 


Robert Wright, 


Sept. 


4 




5 years 




Jehial Ware, 


Mar. 


19 




18 months 




HenryS. Wait, 


June 


10 


'12 


5 years 





64 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. John Bliss's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted . 


Tov what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


May 12 '13 


Dur. Presid'cy 




August 15 




Joined from tbe late Capt 
Eager's Co.. Dec. 20. '13. 


Sept. 22 




Joined from Capt. Smead's 


March 13 




Transf 'd to Capt, Smead's 


Sept. 21 


5 years 




May 28 '12 


" 




June 1 


" 




15 


During war 




March 10 '13 


5 years 




10 


" 




June 1 '12 


5 years 




27 
22 


(i 


Discharged Dec. 26, 1813. 


July 7 


18 months 


Left at Burlington. Vt. 


Oct. 23 


18 months 




Feb. 27 '13 


5 years 




July 4 '12 


" 




June 13 


" 




Feb. 6 '13 






August 19 '12 


5 years 




Sept. 24 '13 


" 




March 29 


" 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's C< 


May 16 '12 


il 


" " " 


June 3 


" 


11 it il 


August 24 


il 




24 
Nov. 2 


It 

a 




June 4 


a 


9 
Feb. 20 '13 


18 months 




Dec. 29 '12 


" . 




Feb. 20 '13 


During war 


it ft it 


March 1 


5 years 


a a a 


Feb. 2 


" 




April 29 


During war 


Waiter to Ensign Beale. 


Feb. 27 


5 years 


Transferred to I-t. Green 


August 30 '12 


18 months 


Co., Dec. 20, 1813. 


March 8 '13 


During war 




Dec. 13 '12 


5 years 




24 


" 




April 5 '13 


it 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's C 


March 17 


it 




June 13 '12 


" 


Deserted March 16. '13. job 


Feb. 5 '13 
March 9 
Feb. 12 


During war 


ed August 12, 1813. 


5 years 




March 2 


" 




Dec. 28 '12 


18 months 




Feb. 6 '13 


During war 




May 26 '12 

27 
June 4 


5 years 




a 


Deserted Dec. 17. '13. fro 


23 

3 

Oct. 31 


" 


French's Mills. N. Y. 


18 months 




Sept. 21 '1C 


5 years 




March 3 


" 




June 4 '12 


a 




March 9 


" 




Sept. 24 


18 months 




June 30 '12 


I During war 




Feb. 2'K 


! 5 years 




July 17 '12 

6 
Feb. 3 


I " 




« 


Sick, in the vicinitv. 


Jan. 12 '1, 


1 " 


Died Dec. 22. '13. Fr. Mills 


| June 2 'i 


K 


|Transf 'd to Lt. Green's C 



John Bliss, Captain, 
Enoch Cooper, 2d Lieut. 

Humphrey Webster, Ens'n. 
Wm. F. Haile, 2d Lieut. 
Hazen Beale, Ensign, 
M.de Lafayette Rogers, Sgt, 
Leonard Hawes, Sergeant, 
Jonath. Lawrence, " 
Henry Jones, 
John Chamberlain, " 
J. P. Burnham, " 
Nathan Young. " 

John Reed, Corporal, 
Calvin Stewart, " 
Joseph H. Brvant, " 
William C. Wait, " 
Ebn'r White, jr. " 
Nath'l Parker, Musician, 
Joseph W. Knight, " 

PRIVATES. 

Jacob Aldrich, 
Collins Andrews, 
Wm. Brown, 
John Bell, 
Jonathan Belding, 
Calvin Bingham, 
James P. Bingham, 
Joseph Bingham, 
David Blanchard, 
David Benson, jr. 
Solomon Burbank, 
Nath'l Colbath, 
Martin L. Crandall, 
Barnard Converse, 
John Dantz, 
John Dantz Jr. 
Oliver Darby, 
David Dickey, 
Spencer Downing, 
Jason Eager, 
Hiram Eager, 
David H. Eddy, 
Gideon P. Ferris, 
Obed Fleming, 
Chancy Fox, 
Elijah Fry, 
Morris Germand, 
Moses Glasler, 
Noah Goodrich, 
Joshua Graves, 
Eben Green, 
Edward Green, 
Ezra Hamlin, 
Nath'l B. Harvey, 
Marcus D. Hewit, 
Israel Hewit, 
Joseph Horn, 
Nicholas Hoit, 
Joseph Hudson, 
Jacob Hobart, 
Richard Jacobs, 
William H. Judd, 
William Kellogg, 
Charles Kill ian, 
Nathaniel Knight, 
Abraham Lampman, 
David Linsley, 
Ellis Markhani, 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 65 

Roll op Capt. Bliss's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


John Meeder, 


Feb. 25,1813 


5 years 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Amos S. Mills, 


June 17, 1812 


" 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Thomas Miles, jr. 


3 


" 




Harris Minar, 


April 4,1813 


During war 




Bohun S. Monroe, 


Aug. 28, 1812 


5 years 




David C. Mare, 


Mar. 1, 1813 


a 




Jonathan Mosier, 


June 2, 1812 


« 


Mustered for discharge. 


Joseph B. Neal, 


Aug. 22 


18 months 




Thomas Newton, 


Feb. 2, 1813 


5 years 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


James Nicholas, 


22 


" 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Josiah Nichols, 


20 


" 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


John Powers, 


May 20, 1812 


" 




David Price, 


June 29 


(< 




John Price, 


25 


« 




Joseph Price, 


Feb. 19, 1813 


" 




Benj. Ranger, 


Mar. 11 


it 




Alexr Reynolds, 


7 


a 




Zachariah Reynolds, 


12 


" 




Seth L. Bobbins, 


Sept. 3, 1812 


" 




Russell P. Rogers, 


June 1 


" 




Aaron Kumsey, 


22 


u 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Joseph B. Sage, 


Feb. 3, 1813 


18 months 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Hazard Shaw, 


Aug. 21, 1812 


a 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Lewis Smith, 


20 


5 years 




Vansanti Smith, 


Sept. 21, 1813 


" 




Amasa Snow, 


Feb. 6 


a 




Jere'h Sprague, 


June 2, 1812 


" 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Ephraim Sprague, 


6 


<< 




Joseph L. Sprague, 


Mar. 3, 1813 


During war 




Samuel G, Summer, 


June 6, 1812 


5 years 




John Thompson, 


Jan. 12, 1813 


" 




Horace B. Tower, 


June 16, 1812 


" 




John B. Tyler, 


5 


" 




Artemus Tyler, 


2 


" 




Joseph Waibridge, jr. 


Aug. 2 


18 months 




Joseph Waibridge, 


Feb. 23, 1813 


" 




Joseph Wallace, 


July 23, 1812 


5 years 




Caleb A. Welton, 


June 23 


" 




Elias Whaley, 


Aug. 23 


18 months 




Ablatha Wheeler, 


May 16 


5 years 




Phineas Whitney, 


Jan. 8, 1813 


18 months 




Samuel Wilbur, 


Aug. 23, 1812 


" 




Hardee Withe rell, 


Feb. 27, 1813 


5 years 




Cato Williams, 


May 24, 1812 


" 


Transf 'd to Lt. Green's Co. 


Henry Allard, 


Feb. 1, 1813 


During war 


This man and all whose 


John Arlin, 


2 


5 years 


names follow were trans- 


Thomas Burks, 


Sept. 4,1812 


18 months 


ferred from the late Capt. 


Andrew Bradford, 


28 


" 


Edgerton's Co. Dec. 20, 


James Bassett. 


Dec. 31, 1812 


5 years 


1813. 


Cates Blan chard, 


30 


18 months 




Solomon Clark, 


June 27 


5 years 




Chena Coburn, 


Feb. 15, 1813 


" 




Eben'r Chamberlin, 


Mar. 17 


During war 




John Collins, 


Sept. 29, 1812 


18 months 




George Conant, 


Mar. 5, 1813 


During war 


Mustered for discharge. 


Love Dennett, 


5 


" 




Israel Daggett, 


Jan. 15 


5 years 




John Depau, 


June 5, 1812 


" 




Joseph Ellery, 


Feb. 12, 1813 


" 




John L. Fisher, 


June 16, 1812 


" 




Abel Fletcher, 


Sept. 28 


18 months 




Anson Frasier, 


Nov. 26 


" 




Charles Fox, 


Mar 17, 1813 


During war 




James Griffin, 


Jan. 2 


" 




John Giles, 


Mar. 9 


" 




Richard Hibbard, 


Jan. 2 


" 




Eli Hinds, 


18 


5 years 




Samuel Hawkins, 


Mar. 12 


<< 




Mansel Hazeltine, 


Feb. 22 


" 


[1813. 


Elisha Sawyer, 


Mar. 29 


18 months 


Reduced from Corp. Dec. 17. 



adjutant-general's report. 
Roll of Capt. Richard Bean's Company. 



Names. 



Remarks. 



Richard Bean, Captain, 
James Wells, 1st Lieut. 
Ezekiel Jewett, 2d Lieut. 
Joseph Hopkins, Ensign, 
Jere'h Kimball, Sergeant, 
Warren Sartwell, " 
Silas W. C. Chase, " 
Stephen Benjamin, " 
Charles Tabor, «' 

William C. Belding, Corp. 
Nath. Black, " 

Dudley Tibbetts, " 

Hubbard Cross, " 

Henry Boutell, " 

Simeon Latham, " 

Eben'r Watson, Musician, 
Edmund Freeman, 

PRIVATES. 

Nath. Boutell, 
Timothy Barnard, 
John Barnes, 
David Brown, 
Ralph Brigham, 
Amos Booth, 
John Bonner, 
Daniel Billings, 
Stephen Cummings, 
John Canney, 
Squire Carpenter, 
Stephen Davis, 
Samuel Danforth, 
Peter Duedown, 
Jonas Dessuin, 
Samuel T. Emerson, 
Moses Emerson, 
John Fisher, 
John Franklin, 
Joseph Fuller, 
Rufus Graves, 
Daniel Guild, 
Hezekiah Goodnow, 
George Goodnow, 
Moses George, 
Samuel Hall, 
John Hart, 
Lewis Hastings, 
James Hines, 
Ben,j . Livingston, 
Isaac Locke, 
Hez. McLaughlin, 
Peter Mason, 
Elisha Muds, 
John Munsill, 
Benj. Morse, 
Solomon Otis, 
Hiram Porter, 
Joseph Putney, 
Eben'r Plan, 
Joseph Plummer, 
Joseph Reid, 
Ambrose Kennell. 
Jonathan Richards, 
James Richards, 
Abraham Richards, 
William Smith, 
Benj. Smith, 
John Smith. 
Thos. Spaulding, 
John Smart, 



April 3, 1812 




Joined Oct. 12, 1813. 


Mar. 12 , 






Mav 12 






Aug. 4, 1813 




Transferred Dec. 12, 1813, t 


May 18, 1812 


5 years 


Lieut. Green's Co. 


June 11 


" 




May 10, 1813 


a 


Promoted to Sergt. Majoi 


Mar. 20 


During war 


Dec. 19, 1813. 


Feb. 1 


5 years 




May 18, 1812 


" 




July 21 


" 




Mar. 1, 1813 


During war 




April 8 


" 




Jan. 30 


5 years 




Feb. 27 


During war 




May 26,1812 


5 years 




Jan. 8, 1813 






June 11, 1812 


5 years 


Missing since Nov. 11, 181 


29 


" 




Aug. 2 


<< 


Transf d to Lt. Green's C 


Jan. 12, 1813 

18 
Mar. 10 


During war 




18 months 




Jan. 29 


" 




Mar. 1 


" 




June 19 


5 years 




Feb. 20, 1813 


During war 




Jan. 19 


5 years 




July 11, 1812 


" 




Sept. 3 


18 months 




Mar. 25, 1813 


During war 




Jan. 1 


5 years 




11 


" 


Died Dec. 23, 1813. 


Feb. 10 


it 




Apr. 5 


" 




Jan. 11 


" 




Mar. 3 


" 




May 28, 1812 


it 




Mar. 1, 1813 


18 months 


Killed in action Nov. 11,18 


29 


During war 




30 


Sept 29 




April 7 


During war 




Mar. 25 


18 months 




Sept. 30, 1812 


5 years 




May 19 


« 




June 7 


" 


Died Dec. 9th, 1813. 


Jan. 25, 1813 


During war 




Mar. 18 


" 




Aug. 22, 1812 


5 years 




June 24 


18 months 




Mar. 24, 1813 




Died Dec. 11,1813. 


Dec. 29, 1812 


5 years 




April 1, 1813 


During war 




Mar. 5 
15 


5 years 




April 1 


" 


Deserted, Oct. 6, 1813. 


Mar. 9 


it 




Feb. 6 


During war 




Mav 30, 1812 


5 years 




Feb. 4, 1813 


During war 




10 


5 years 




o 
May 17 


During war 


Sick in hospital. 


June 3. 1812 


5 years 




April 2, 1813 

1 
Sept. 1812 


|| 




« 




April 9, 1813 


(C 


Sick in hospital. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 67 

Roll of Capt. Bean's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


George Stearns, 


Mar. 8, 1813 


5 years 




Abel Sanderson, 


Jan. 18 


During war 




Sylvan us Town, 


Mar. 5 


5 years 




John Thompson, 


Feb. 7 


" 




John Tabor, 


Jan. 11 


" 




Samuel Whitney, 


Mar. 31 


18 months 




David Woodman, 


Feb. 8 


5 years 


Died Sept. 14, 1813. 


Stephen Whipple, 


Mar. 12 


18 months 




Peter Wylie, 


Aug. 22, 1812 


" 




William Wells, 


Sept. 1 


5 years 




Joseph Woods, 


Mar. 9, 1813 


" 




3eorge Williams, 


Jan. 28 


18 months 




Danforth Worthington, 


Unknown 


Unknown 




Jonathan Clark, 


July 4, 1812 


18 months 




David Laithe, 


Feb. 11,1813 


5 years 




Enoch Little. 


April 7 


During war 




Wm. Richardson, 


Feb. 11 


5 years 




Ami R. C. Ransom, 


May 28, 1812 


" 




Samuel Ransom, 


June 1 


" 




;saac Robertson, 


Sept. 30 


18 months 




Jedediah H. Robertson, 


July 6 


" 




Bather L. Stockwell, 


Mar. 27,1813 


5 years 




Zebediah Silver, 


29 


During war 




'utnam Silver, 


Feb. 27 


" 




3enj. Silver. 


Julv 16, 1812 


18 months 


Deserted Dec. 31, 1813. 


Christopher Silver, 


Mai-. 27, 1813 


During war 




Ibseph Smith, 


Feb. 8 


" 




jevi Smith, 


Mar. 8 


5 years 




Surnham Snow, 


17 


During war 




Dbed Snow, 


24 


" 




^.aron Scott, 


Feb. 11 


5 years 




Roderick Taylor, 


Jan. 31 


" 




John Ton ( ?), 


April 7 


During war 




Ibraham Ihayer, 


Mar. 15 


" 




*aul Varney, 


29 


5 years 




Tames Weaver, 


Sept. 26, 1912 


18 months 




Samuel Wylie, 


Feb. 13, 1813 


During war 




Sylvester Washburn, 


22 


" 




John Whitne v, 


Mar. 2 


ft 




Nicholas C. Wells, 


Feb. 12 


« 





Note. In making this Muster Roll I have availed myself of all the information 
within my reach, and errors may be discovered not apparent to me, my means of ac- 
quiring accurate knowledge of the state of the company being very circumscribed, in 
;onsequence of all the company's books and papers being withheld from me by the for- 
ner commander of it. 

(Signed) Richard Beax, Capt. 11th Regt. 



68 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Y. R. Goodrich's Company. 



Names. When enlisted. For what time. 


Remarks. 


Val. R. Goodrich, Captain, « 


lune 25, 1813 






Thos. Lavake, 1st Lieut. 


Aug. 15 


Transferred Dec. 21. 1813. 


J. V. Barron, 2d Lieut. 


Tune 26 


Joined Dec. 21, 1813. 


Ben,}. Stephenson, Ensign, 


Sept. 21 




Joined Dec. 21, 1813. 


William Blake, Sergeant, 


July 6, 1812 


5 years 




Zalmon C. Palmer, " 


Tune 2 


" 


Absent, sick. 


Eben. Bohonon, " 


Tuly 14 


18 months 




Godfrey F. Belding, " 


Sept. 20 


" 


Absent, sick. 


Albert Rathbone, " 


May 18 


5 years 


Discharged Dec 22, 1813. 


Elisha Hoit, Corporal, 


Tuly G 


" 




Ashael Lyon, " 


Tune 22 


18 months 




Zera Green, " 


Jan. 21, 1813 


During war 




Noel Potter, " 


Feb. 8 


" 




John Shattuck, " 


15 


5 years 




Dwight Marsh, Musician, 


12 


" 


Absent with leave. Sick. 


Russell Myrick, " 


18 


a 


Absent with leave. Sick. 


Rufus Whitcomb, " 


22 


During war 




Jos. M. Sanbourn, " 


June 27, 1812 


18 months 


Discharg2d Dec. 26, 1813. 


Clement S. Minor, " 


Feb. 8, 1813 


5 years 


Absent, sick. 


PRIVATES. 








George Alger, 


Aug. 22, 1812 


5 years 




Alanson Adams, 


Jan. 28, 1813 


" 




Gardner Adams, 


28 


" 




Simon Allen, 


May 5 


During war 




Henry Allard, 


March 22 


" 




John Bissell, 


June 9, 1812 


5 years 




Timothy Burdick, 


July 15 


" 




George Beels, 


Oct. 3 


18 months 




Samuel Boynton, 


Feb. 17, 1813 


5 years 


Died October 21, 1813. 


John Brown, 


Jan. 1 


18 months 




Wilder Brown, 


13 


" 




Ephraim Bo wen, 


March 8 


5 years 




Phineas E. Baker, 


Feb. 17 


"" 




David Butler, 


March 22 


During war 




William Bickford, 


Jan. 2 


18 months 




Enoch Bickford, 


1 


" 




Isaac Bickford, 


8 


" 




Timothy Bradford, 


March 23 


During war 




Paul Brewster, 


22 


" 




John Clute, 


Feb. 12 


5 years 




Reuben Clough, 


Oct. 1, 1812 






Isaac Churchill, 


March 27, 1813 






Aaron Crandall, 


Aug. 22, 1812 


18 months 




Nathaniel Cook, 


July 9, 1813 






James Collier, 


5, 1812 


5 years 


Returned for discharge. 


Joseph Clark, 


June 2 


" 




Amos Coary, 


Sept. 29 


18 months 




Job G. Camp, 


Oct. 3 


" 




Robert Cockle, 


March 2, 1813 


5 years 




John Colfix, 


Feb. 8 


During war 




Abel Davenport, 


16 


5 years 


Discharged at Sacket 


Thomas Dickinson, 


Oct. 19, 1812 


18 months 


Harbor, Nov. 8. 1813. 


Oliver Davis, 


Feb. 26, 1813 


During war 


Returned for discharge. 


Abner Davis, 


March 10 


" 




Solomon Davis, 


April 13 


" 




.James Drown, 


Aug. 13, 1812 


18 months 




Moses Drown, 


Jan. 13, 1812 






Micajah Drown, 


Aug. 13, 1812 


it 




Samuel Drown, 


Jan. 1, 181c 


" 




iTsaac Drown, 


Aug. 10, 1812 


a 




Thomas Drew, 


Jan. 6, 18 U 


" 




Cary Edwards, 


June 2, 1815 


5 years 




Richard Estis, 


8 


" 




Amasa Follet, 


8 


" 




Noell Freshet, 


July 25 


tt 




Samuel Foster, 


Feb. 20, 18L* 


i " 




.'Francois Fitield, 


Julv 2, 1815 


! 18 months 




Moses Fall. 


Feb. 12, 18 K 


i During war 




George Fuller, 


|May 28, 1815 


l\ 5 years 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 69 

Roll of Capt. Goodrich's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Wilson Fi slier, 


June 22, 1812 


5 years 


Deserted Dec. 26, 1813. 


John Fox, 


18 


" 




William Godard, 


Oct. 18 


18 months 




Alex. F. Gregory, 


March 22, 1813 


5 years 




Stodard Green, 


Jan. 18 


" 




Francois Grandue, 


Feb. 18 


« 




Nathaniel Gould, 


Sept. 2, 1812 


18 months 




Joel Greely, 


Jan. 29, 1813 


" 




Peter Goodrich, 


Aug. 17, 1812 


5 years 




Oliver Gallutin, 


Sept. 9 


" 




John Gillmon, 


Feb. 20, 1813 


During war 




Joseph Godfrey, 


Aug. 8, 1812 


18 months 




Zebina Hubbard, 


June 15 


5 years 




Artiban Hoyt, 


March 11, 1813 


" 




David Hodsdon, 


22 


During war 




William Hill, 


Feb. 1 


" 




Amzi Judd, 


March 1 


5 years 




John Jewel, 


Jan. 20 


" 




David Jewel, 


July 8, 1812 


18 months 




Amos Kyle, 


July 23 


" 




Beels Killicutt, 


Feb. 1, 1813 


K 




John Lampher, 


June 24, 1812 


5 years 




Joseph Ladd, 


Oct. 23 


18 months 


Died December 9, 1813. 


Robert Miller, 


June 8 


5 years 




John Martin, 


23 


18 months 




Peter Mossey, 


Aug. 18 


5 years 


Discharged Dec. 23, 1813. 


David Martin, 


March 30, 1813 


" 




Asa McNamara, 


April 1 


tt 




John Neels, 


Aug. 29, 1812 


18 months 




Nathan Nay, 


March 11, 1813 


5 years 




David W. Older, 


July 11, 1812 


" 


Absent, sick. 


Reuben Philips, 


Feb. 12, 1813 


During war 


Returned for a discharge. 


Loran Pano, 


March 4 


5 years 


Transferred Dec. 21, 1813. 


Cyrus Pierce, 
Alpheus Paul, 


Oct. 8, 1812 


18 months 




March 22, 1813 


During war 




Henry Perry, 


Feb. 10 


18 months 




Thomas B. Reed, 


Jan. 24, 1812 


5 years 




Nathan Sears, 


Feb. 19 


During war 


Transferred Dec. 21, 1813. 


William Sears, 


19 


5 years 




Abel Steel, 


Jan. 13, 1813 


18 months 




Edward Taylor, 


March 10 


5 years 




Simon Thrasher, 


8 


During war 




Abraham Vredenburgh, 


9 


5 years 




Gardner Wright, 


Oct. 18, 1812 


18 months 




Ebenezer H. Wise, 


March 31, 1813 


During war 




Lewis Ward, 


Feb. 26 


5 years 




James Weed, 


6 


n 




Salmon Whitlock, 


6 


" 




Benjamin Weed, Jr. 


18 


" 


Joined Dec. 18, 1813. Paid 


John Wood, 


March 12 


During war 


to June 30, 1813. 


Daniel Blandon, 


Jan. 19 


5 years 




Job Barnett, 


29 


18 months 




Martin Hatch, 


March 18 


5 years 




Jotham Stebbins, 


Feb. 25 


" 




David McKnight, 


27 


18 months 




David Patch, 


March 16 


During war 





70 



ADJUTANT-GENERALS REPORT. 



A portion of the 11th Regiment was recruited by officers 
of other regiments; thus, Lieut. Jonathan Eastman of Con- 
cord, attached to the 21st Regiment, recruited certain sol- 
diers for the 11th, as appears by the following Roll : 

Roll of a Detachment of Lieut. Jonathan Eastman's 

Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



For what time 



Remarks. 



*Jonathan Eastman, 1st Lt. 
Josiah Bartlett, 2d Lieut. 
Joseph Low, Ensign, 
James Goodhue, Sergeant, 
Wm. Mitchell, Q. M. Sergt. 
F. Gerard LaFarge, Mus'n. 
Benoni Potter, Private, 



March 12, 1812 

May 26 

June 11 

May 25 

June 29 

June 10 



5 years 



In November 1812, eleven companies of volunteers were 
nearly completed in our State, and some of them at 
the rendezvous at Concord. They were enlisted for a year. 

On the 28th of that month, agreeable to notice in the N. 
H. Patriot, the " First Regiment of New Hampshire Vol- 
unteers" was organized at Concord, by the choice of the 
following officers, viz. : 

Aquila Davisf of Warner, Colonel. 

*Jonathan Eastman, Jr., born Nov. 14, 1781, at East Concord, was the son of Jonathan 
Eastman, Sen., of that village, and the great grandson of Capt. Ebenezer Eastman, the 
first settler of Concord. He was appointed Lieutenant, March 12, 1812, and Paymaster 
of Col. E. W. Ripley's Regiment, (the 21st U. S. Infantry,) raised in Maine and New- 
Hampshire, July 23, 1812. He was appointed Captain, July, 1813, of the 21st Regiment, 
then commanded by Col. James Miller. Capt. Eastman being an exact accountant was 
usually upon detached service connected with the Paymaster's department. After the 
close of the war he settled in his native village, following the vocation of farmer and 
surveyor, in which capacity he spent much time in Maine and in the " Indian Stream 
Territory," of which he was one of the proprietors. Capt. Eastman was a man of 
genial habits, much general information, and a valued citizen. He died at Concord, 
March 23, 1867, in the 86th year of his age. 

t Col. Davis was from Warner, a well-known mill-owner and lumberman. He was 
born in Amesbury, Mass., Feb. 8, 1761, and moved to Warner (then called New Ames- 
bury), at an early period of the settlement of the town. 

He was Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the 30th Regiment from 1799 to 1807, 
and Brigadier-General of the 4th Brigade from 1807 to 1809. In 1812. General Davis 
raised the 1st Regiment of N. H. Volunteers enlisted for one year, and was chosen and 
commissioned its Colonel. The law for raising volunteers having been repealed, Jan- 
nary 29, 1813, by Congress, the 1st N. H. Regiment of Volunteers was mostly trans- 
ferred to, and formed, the 45th Regiment U. S. Infantry, and Colonel Davis was com- 
missioned its Lieut.-Colonel. lt is related of Colonel Davis that while stationed on 
an Island, in Lake Champlain, he mounted a battery of huge guns, and kept the 
British at a respectful distance from the shore by his formidable battery. The chagrin 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 71 

John Carter* of Concord, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Wm. Bradford of Mont Vernon, 1st Major. 
Zabez Smith of Salisbury, 2d Major. 
Joseph Low of Amherst, Adjutant. 

The officers thus chosen were duly commissioned, except 
Joseph Low, who declined, but accepted the office of Quar- 
termaster of the regiment, and James Minot was commis- 
sioned as Adjutant. 

The regiment was ordered into camp the first of Feb- 
ruary, 1813, and early in the spring marched to Burlington. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS OF THE 1ST N. H. REGIMENT OF 
VOLUNTEERS. 

Aquila Davis, Colonel. 

John Carter, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

William Bradford, Major. 

James Minot, 1st Lieutenant, and Adjutant. 

Joseph Low, 2d Lieutenant, and Quartermaster. 

Henry Lyman, Acting Surgeon's Mate. 

John Trevitt, Acting Surgeon's Mate. 

Timothy D. Abbott, Sergeant Major. 

Nicholas G. Bean, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Thomas Bailey, Drum Major. 

Nehemiah Osgood, Fife Major. 

of the British officers was not small, when, too late to profit by the knowledge, they 
discovered that the Yankee in command had exercised his mechanical skill, and had 
improvised a battery of huge guns from pine logs, hewn, fashioned, and painted in 
imitation of ''the real article!" Upon the return of peace, General Davis retired 
to his mills, and spent his days in his usual avocation. He was a man of sound judg- 
ment and great energy and enterprise. He died Feb. 27, 1835, while on a journey to 
Sharon, Me., aged 74 years. 

* Lieut-. Colon el John Carter was a native of Concord, the son of David Carter, and 
was born in 1759. He was a soldier of the Revolution, having served in Captain Benj. 
Emery's company, Colonel Baldwin's regiment. He was Captain of the 8th Company 
of Infantry in the 11th Regiment in 1806. 

He raised a company in Concord and vicinity, and was chosen Lieut. -Colonel of the 
First Regiment of Volunteers from New Hampshire, by the members thereof, and. 
duly commissioned as such by the President. Colonel Carter was a man of great 
energy and enterprise, and an extensive farmer. He died Nov. 7, 1847, in the 89th 
year of his age. 



72 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Elisha Smith's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Time engaged. 


Remarks. 


Elisha Smith, Captain, 


Feb. 


1, 1812 


One year. 


Resigned. 


Thomas Hoit, 1st Lieut. 




" 








Wm. Lang, 2d Lieut. 




tt 






Resigned. 


Saml. Morrison, Ensign, 




a 








James T. Taylor, Sergt. 




tt 






Joined since the act was 


Jonathan Severance," 




« 






repealed authorizing a 


John Dow, " 




it 






corps of volunteers. 


Clark Foss, 


Mar. 


11 








Jonathan F. Davis, Cor. 


Feb. 


1 






Re-enlisted May 1, 1813. 


Jonathan Edgerly, " 




" 






Re-enlisted May 1,1813. 


PRIVATES. 










Amos Garland, 


Feb. 


1, 1812 


One year. 


Sick at Ossipee, N. H. 


Benj. R. Buzzell, 




" 






Re-enlisted Apr. 8, 1813. 


Benj. Peavey, 


Mar. 


11 






Re-enlisted Apr. 8, 1 813. 


David Watson, 


Feb. 


1 






Sick at Montpelier, Vt. 


David F. Gilman, 




a 






Sick at Gilford, N. H. 


Edward Rumery, 




a 






Re-enlisted May 8, 1813. 


Elijah Hanson, 


Mar. 


14 






Deserted. 


Ezekiel Hook, 




11 






Deserted. 


John Drew, 


Feb. 


1 






Re-enlisted May 8, 1813. 


Jotham Morrill, 




" 






Re-enlisted Apr. 24, 1813. 


John Leveasey, 




tt 






Re-enlisted Apr. 5, 1813. 


John S. Peavey, 




" 






Re-enlisted May 12, 1813. 


John Chase, 




u 








James Junkins, 




It 






Re-enlisted Apr. 1, 1813. 


Jason Chamberlain, 




" 








Jacob Ham, 




tt 






Died April 21, 1813. 


Josiah Colcord, 


Mar. 


11 








Joseph W. Wiggin, 




" 






Re-enlisted Apr. 21, 1813. 


James Peavey, 




It 






Sick at Tuftonboro, N. H. 


Jeremiah Prescott, 




16 






Died April 19, 1813. 


Noah Hill, 


Feb. 


1 






Re-enlisted May 8, 1813. 


Nath. Hoit, 


Mar. 


11 








Nathan Abbott, 




16 








Samuel Gilman, 


Feb. 


1 






Re-enlisted May 7, 1813. 


Stephen Stratten, 




tt 








Solomon Davis, 


Mar. 


16 






Re-enlisted Apr. 3, 1813. 


Samuel Moody, 




<( 






Re-enlisted Mav 5, 1813. 


Thomas King, 


Feb. 


10 






Re-enlisted Apr. 1, 1813. 


Theodore Evans, 




1 








Thomas Noah, 




" 








Thomas Canney, 


Mar. 


11 






Died Apr. 19, '13; joined 
since the act was repeal- 
ed authorizing a corps 
of volunteers. 


William Watson, 




tt 






Re-enlisted into the re- 
gular service May 7/13 


William Mclntire, 


Mar. 


14 






Deserted. 

Re-enlisted into the re- 


Dominicus Abbott, 




31 






gular service Apr. 21, 


William Pinkham, 


Feb. 


1 






1813. 



military history of new-hampshire. 73 

Eoll of Capt. Thomas Currier's Company. 



Names. " 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Thomas Currier, Captain, 


Feb. 


1, 1813 


Mar. 31, 1813. 


Rec'd one month's pay from 
Feb. 1, to Feb. 28, 1813. 


James Minot, 1st Lieut. 




li 




Appointed Adjutant, paid 


Samuel Rogers, 2d Lieut. 




" 




on Field and Staff Rolls, 


John Gage, Ensign, 




" 




commissioned Jan. 10, '13. 


"Wm. Gage, Sergeant, 




" 






Scribner Huntoon, " 




.it 






Daniel Woodward, " 




it 






Eben'r Eaton, Corporal, 




" 






Wm. Lamb, Priv. & Corp. 




" 




Promoted to Corporal, Feb. 


Hubbard Cross, Corporal, 




" 




18, 1813. 


Enoch Sargent, " 




a 






Cor bin Huntoon, Musician, 




a 






Jacob C. Stickney, " 




u 






PRIVATES. 










Joseph Averey, 


Feb. 


1, 1813 


Mar. 31, 1813 




Moody Brocklebank, 




ti 


" 




Simeon Blood, 




il 


" 




Jeremiah Bean, 


Mar. 


1 


it 




James Bayes, 




24 


" 




Amasa Coburn, 




10 


" 




John Clogston, 




1 


" 




John Collis, Jr. 




19 


tt 




Joseph Chase, Jr. 




22 


it 




Isaac Colbath, 




27 


it 




Edward Chadwick, 


Feb. 


1 


it 




Richmond Clapp, 




" 


" 




Enoch Church, 




" 


<< 




Thomas Cheney, 




a 


" 




Daniel Cheney, 




" 


<( 




John Cushing, 




<( 


" 




Moses Davis, 




a 


" 




Thomas Davis, 


Mar. 


21 


ti 




Samuel Evans, 


Feb. 


1 


it 




John Fisher, 




1 


it 




Samuel Fifield, 


Mar. 


1 


ti 




Sam. Folansbee, 




17 


Mar. 28 


Enlisted in 5 vears' service, 


Wm. Frazier, 




10 


31 


March 29, 1813. 


Amos George, 


Feb. 


1 






Jeremiah Gove, 




n 


a 




James Harvey, 




ti 


it 




Levi Hastings, 




" 


a 




David Jewett, 


Feb. 


15 


it 




Bradbury Kimball, 




1 


tt 




Thomas Lamb, 




" 


• " 




Daniel Marsh, 




<< 


<( 




Hezekiah Mills, 




tt 


it 




Samuel Morse, 


Mar. 


12 


a 




Daniel Muzzey, 


Feb. 


1 


tt 




Wm Pressey," 




" 


tt 




Daniel Pickernall, 




a 


a 


Promoted to Corporal Feb. 


Samuel Pickernall, 




ca 


it 


18, 1813. 


Timothy Peasley, 




a 


it 


Deserted. 


Hezekiah Peck, 




" 


Mar. 31 




Aaron Rowell, 




a 






John Stevens, 


Mar. 


23 


it 




John Sholes, 




12 


it 




Hezekiah L. Thistle, 


Feb. 


1 


a 




John M. Williams, 






ti 




Alex'r Witherspoon, 




n 


Mar. 29 


Enlisted in 5 years' service, 


Gideon Wells, 




a 


31 


March 30, 1813. 


Frederick Wilkins, 




" 


31 




James Young, 


Feb. 


15 


13 


Enlisted in 5 vears' service, 


James Young, 2d, 




1 


11 


March 30, 1813. 


Ezekiel Young, 


Mar. 


12 


11 




Daniel Emory, 




30 


11 




Aaron Atkins, 






Mar. 31 




Joseph Pillsburv, 




" 







74 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Smith's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Smith, Captain, 


Feb. 1, 1813. 


One year. 




David George, 1st Lieut. 


" 






James Bean, 2d Lieut. 


it 






Richard Patee, Ensign, 


" 






Stephen George, Sergeant, 


" 






Philip Osgood, " 


it 






David Straw, " 


It 






Daniel Flood, " 


tt 




[ranks May 12, 1813. 


Benjamin Evans, Corporal, 


<( 




Absent, sick, reduced to the 


Daniel Bean, '• 


" 




On command. 


John Barnard, " 


" 




Promoted April 1, 1813. 


Ezekiel Roby, " 


(( 




Promoted May 1, " 


Samuel Roby, " 


" 




Promoted May 12, • " 


Jeremiah Silver, Musician, 


" 




Absent, sick. 


William B. Walker, " 


ft 






PRIVATES. 








David Bagley, 


Feb. 1, 1813 


One year. 




Robert Bailey, 


" 


" 




Timothy B. Chase, 


" 


" 




Timothy Carpenter, 


« 


" 




Moses F. Colby, 


it 


" 




Charles Colby, 


<« 


<« 




Phineas Daiiforth, 


it 


tt 




Zadoc Dow, 


tt 


a 




John Davis, 


tt 


« 




Jesse Davis, 


tt 


tt 




Joshua Eliot, 


a 


" 




Stephen G. Eaton, 


tt 


tt 




Moses C. Eaton, 


tt 


" 




Enoch French, 


it 


" 


On detachment. 


Amos Flood, 


" 


tt 




Merinor Flood, 


it 


tt 




Thomas W. Freelove, 


a 


" Deserted 3d April, 1813. 


David Hardy, 


it 


*' 




James Hastings, 


a 


<• 




Richard Hunt, 


tt 


it 




Isaiah Hoyt, 


" 


a 




David C. Harriman, 


<< 


" 




Ezra Jewell, 


" 


tt 




Winthrop M. Lowell, 


" 


" 




William Little, 


" 


" Absent, sick. 


James Little, 


it 


it 




Joseph Maxrield, 


" 


" 




John Morrill, 


it 


tt 




Nehemiah Osgood, 


" 


a 


Pro. Apr. 3. '13, to Fife Maj. 


Eben Stevens, 


it 


" 


On command. 


Royal W.Stanley, 


" 


" 


On detachment. 


Samuel G. Titeomb, 


" 


" 


Overlooked on the last mus- 


Abraham Waldron, 


it 


" 


ter-roll through mistake. 


Piumer Wheeler, 


tt 


" 




Samuel Wheeler, 


" 


" 




James Wheeler, 


" 


" 


Died Mav 30, 1813. 


Ebenezer Woodbury, 


" 


« 


Died April 10, li [Tfegt, 


Humphrey Bursiel, 


tt 


" 


Enlisted Apr.'IS.into the 4th 


John Smith, 


ft 


" 


Deserted Apr. 12. 1813, sub. 


Ambrose C. Sargent, 


" 


for Joseph Folsom. 


Jona. Stevens, " 


tt 





military history of new-hampshire. 
Roll of Capt. Joseph Flanders' Company. 



75 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Flanders, Capt. 


Feb. 


23, 1813 


One year. 




Ahaz French, 1st Lieut. 




23 




On command. 


Jas. Goodwin, 2d Lieut. 




23 






Enoch Page, Jr., Ensign, 




23 






Jeremiah Hutchins, Serg. 




23 






Moody Parker, " 
John M. French, " 




23 








23 






John McLang, " 


Mar 


31 






William Cross, Corporal, 


Feb. 


23 






Moses Parker, " 




23 






Joshua Belknap, " 




23 






William Leinster, " 




23 






Daniel Eowell, Musician, 




23 






Abner Flanders, " 




23 






PRIVATES. 










Thomas Todd, 






One year. 


Not joined. 


Benjamin Gale, 








Not joined. 


Joshua Belknap, 


Feb. 


23 




Died March 6, 1813. 


Benj. Woodbury, 








Re-enlisted before must'd. 


Peter Eider, 


Feb. 


23 






James Lewis, 




23 






John Smith, 




23 






Daniel Heath, 








Not joined. 


David Whipple, 








In prison at Haverhill, 


Obediah Morse, 


Feb. 


23 




N. H. 


Benj. Morse, 




23 






Aaron Judd, 




23 






John R. Judd, 




23 






Kendrick Houghton, 




23 




Died March 16, 1813. 


Benjamin Smith, 




23 






Noah Clark, 




23 






Jacob Bo win, 




23 




Minor, discharged, 


Daniel Palmer, 




28 






Joseph Clifford, 




23 




On furlough. 


James Aiken, 




23 






Edward Putney, 




23 




Re-enlisted before must'd 


John Jackman, 




23 






Jewett Palmer, 




23 






Noah Moulton, 




23 






Lake Aldrich, 




23 






Moses Aldrich, 




23 






Gilbert Drew, 




23 






Theodore Dike, 




23 






John Little, 




23 






Benj. Bailey, 




23 






John F. M. Kendrick, 




23 






Jeremiah Fuller, 








Not joined. 


Benj. Cross, 








Not joined. 


Aaron Clark, 


Feb. 


23 




On furlough. 


Geo. W. Lucas, 








Notjoined. 


Sylvanus Currier, 
William Merriam, 








In jail at Haverhill, N. H 
Not joined. 



76 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Flanders' Co. — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Merrill, 




One year. 


Not joined. 


Peter Gambey, 








Not joined. 


Giles French, 








Not joined. 


Mathew Thornton, 


Feb. 23,1813 








John Bickford, 








Not joined. 


John Avery, Jr. 


Feb. 23 








Aden Rartlett, 


23 








Samuel Johnson, 


Mar. 11 






Sub. for Eliphalet Day. 


John Hazen, 








Substitute. 


Job Colcord, 


Mar. 12 






Sub. for Joseph Putney. 


Bathewel C. Rowell, 


31 








Joshua Kimball, 








Not joined. 


Samuel Woodbury, 








Not joined. 


Levi Judd, 


Mar. 21 






Sub. for Eph. Morrill. 


Geo. J. Flanders, 


14 






Sub for D.Moulton, in jail 


David Cowen, 








Not joined. 


Samuel Fuller, 








Not joined. 


Obed French, 








Not joined. 


Abijah Mendall, 








Not joined. 


James Stevens, 


Feb. 23 








Joseph Leavitt, 


23 






Re-enlisted Mar. 15. 1813 



military history of new-hampshire. 77 

Pay Roll of Capt. Benj. Bradford's Company. 



Names. 



From "when. 



To when. 



Eemarks. 



Benj. Bradford, Captain, 


April 1, 1813 


May 31, 1813 




Daniel Gregg, 1st Lieut. 


a 


tt 




David Campbell, Ensign, 


" 


a 




Paul Morrill, Sergeant, 


(< 


a 




Dexter Fairbanks, " 


'• 


" 




Simeon Laken, " 


" 


" 




Win. Rumrill, " 


« 


" 




Isaac Bell, Corporal, 


" 


a 




Samuel Dennis, " 


" 


" 




Eobert Marsh, " 


« 


tt 




Zebediah Shattuck, " 


" 


" 




James Brown, Musician, 


at 


tt 




George Woolson, " 


tt 


April 2 


Enlisted in the regular 
army, Apr. 3, 1813, — 
due him 60 cents. 


David Bell, 


a 


May 31, 1813 


Appointed musician Apr. 
1, 1813. 


PRIVATES. 








Joseph Atwood, 


April 1, 1813 


May 31, 1813 




Daniel Atwood, 


a 


" 




George Ball, 


a 


a 




Jonathan Barker, 


it 


tt 




Eben'r Barnes, 


« 


« 




Peleg L. Brooks, 


March 1 


tt 


Not paid on last rolls. 


Joseph Babb, 


April 1 


tt 




Joseph H. Curtis, 


u 


" 




Ziba Curtis, 


a 


a 




Daniel Campbell, 


« 


a 




Joseph Coburn, 


« 


tt 




Samuel Clogsdon, 


« 


« 




Aaron Colby, 


u 


" 




Silas Duper, 


(I 


tt 




Abel Duper, 


le 


tt 




Abraham Davis, 


it 


t: 




Daniel Ellenwood, 


a 


« 




John Felch, 


tt 


« 




Noah Farrer, 


« 


« 




Isaac Farrer, 


" 


a 




Charles Fairbanks, 


it 


« 




Charles Gates, 


" 


it 




Benj. Hopkins, 


tt 


a 




Ephraim Philbrick, 


« 


a 




Lewis F. Peabody, 


tt 


a 




Reuben Patch, 


a 


a 




William Presbury, 


a 


tt 




Lyman Robbins, 


a 


it 




John Robbins, 


a 


a 




Silas Roads, 


a 


tt 




David Smith, 


a . 


a 




Ephraim Smith, 


a 


a 




James Smith, 


a 


a 




Isaac Sargent, 


a 


a 




Thomas W. Thomas, 


a ' 


tt 




Joseph White, 


a 


a 




Nathan Wheeler, ! 


a 


a 





78 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Bradford's Co. — concluded. 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


Peter Whittaker, 


April 1,1813 


May 31,1813 




Paul Whitcomb, 


tt 


" 




Weston Young, 


tt 


tt 




William Greenleaf, 


it 


tt 




Leonard Kezer, 


tt 


tt 




Horace Whitney, 


tt 


tt 




John Stewart, 


tt 


Apr. 17 


Died April 18, 1813,— 


Moses Stratton, 


" 


May 31 


due him $4.53. 


David Leslie, 


tt 


Apr. 3 


Enlisted in the regular 


George Leslie, 


tt 


May 31 


array, Apr. 4, 1813, — 


David Monroe, 


tt 


31 


due him 80 cents. 


Robert Mathews, 


" 


31 




Nelson Patterson, 


tt 


31 




David Patch, 


tt 


Apr. 22 


Died Apr, 23, 1813,— 
due him $5.86. 


James Taggart, 


it 


3 


Died Apr. 4, 1813, — due 
him 80 cents. 



It will be seen by the above, and some of the succeeding 
rolls, that the date of enlistment, and term of service, are 
not given — from the fact that they are bi-monthly pay rolls, 
and do not contain the desired information, but simply the 
commencement and ending of pay due on that muster. 
The men were accepted and mustered into service, how- 
ever, by Lieutenant-Colonel John Darrington, at some 
earlier date, and it is to be regretted that the original 
muster-in-rolls are not to be found. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 79 

Roll of Capt. Lemuel B. Mason's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Lemuel B. Mason, Capt. 


Mar. 26, 1813 


One year 




Parker Chase, 1st Lieut. 


it 


it 




Samuel Leavitt, 2d Lt. 


" 


a 




John Prescott, Ensign, 


tt 


a 




Hugh Blaisdell, Sergt. 


ti 


ti • 


' 


Joseph Libbey, " 


" 


it 




Lem. H. Boynton, " 


ft 


" 


Apr. 22, 1813, re-enlisted. 


John Davis, " 


" 


it 


Discharged by a substi- 


Ezekiel Burnham, Corp. 


tt 


" 


tute. 


Miles Leavitt, " 


(( 


it 




John Sweet, " 


" 


tt 




Daniel Chase, " 


ft 


tt 




Saml. Mudgett, Drum'r. 


" 


a 




Kobert A.Bradley, Fifer, 


" 


a 




PRIVATES. 








John Bryant, 


Mar. 26, 1813 


One year 




William Bradbury, 


k 


a 




Joseph Conner, 


Apr. 23 


" 


Sub. for John Davis. 


Wm. Dockham, 


Mar. 26 


a 




Simeon Davis, 




a 


Not joined. 


Humphrey Eaton, 


Apr. 26 


tt 




Samuel Follett, 


Mar. 26 


tt 




Daniel Erohock, 


26 


tt 




Andrew Eolsom, 




it 


Not joined. 


Eufus Gordon, 


Apr. 26 


tt 


Enlisted in the reg. service 


Jonathan Haekett, 


26 


ft 


Apr. 26, 1813. 


Stephen Gale, 


, 


" 


Not joined. 


Jonathan Johnson, 


3 


tt 


Re-enlisted May 11, 1813. 


Joel Judkins, 




tt 


Not joined. 


John Kimball, 




it 


Not joined, 


Stephen Langlcy, 


Mar. 26 


tt 




Simeon Lovett, 


26 


tt 




Jonathan Leavitt, 




it 


Not joined. 


Richard Moulton, 


Mar. 26 


" 




Winslow Maynard, 


Apr. 26 


a 




Josiah Moulton, 


26 


« 




Parker Morgan, 




tt 


Not joined. 


Jonathan Quimby, 


Mar. 26 


" 




Joseph Quimby, 


26 


" 




Joseph Eand, 




tt 


Not joined. 


Jonathan Rundlett, 


Mar. 26 


ti 




Isaac Reynolds, 




tt 




John Sanborn, 


Apr. 26 


it 


Re-enlisted Apr. 26, 1813. 


Jonathan L. Seavey, 




tt 


Not joined. 


Samuel D. Stearns, 


Apr. 26 


a 




Jonathan Thompson, 




tt 


Not joined. 


John Til ton, 




" 


Not joined. 


Thomas West, 




a 


Not joined. 


Samuel West, 




ti 


Not joined. 


Edward West, 




it 


Not joined. 


Andrew Welch, 




a 


Not joined. 


Benning Wilkerson, 


Mar. 26 


it 




Bradbury Wilkerson, 


26 


" 




Joseph York, 


26 


tt 




Burleigh Lyford, 


Apr. 26 


" 


Sub. for Joseph Rand. 



80 adjutant-general's report. 

Pay Roll of Lieut. Jonathan Butterfield's Company, 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


J. Butterfield, 1st Lieut. 


April 1, 1813 


May 31, 1813 




Marshall Baker, 2d, " 


" 


<( 




Wells Carter, Ensign, 


a 


<c 




John Carter, Sergeant, 


" 


ft 




Henry Tukesbury, " 


a 


(< 




John Elliott, Corporal, 


" 


" 




John Andrews, " 


tt 


(( 




Samuel Glines, " 


" 


« 




Thomas Hook, " 


<( 


(< 


Promoted from privat 


Zen as Adams, Musician, 


tt 


" 


to Corp'l Apr. 12,1813 


Noah Kidder, 


a 


ft 




PRIVATES. 








Samuel Andrews, 


April 1, 1813 


May 31, 1813 




Daniel Chandler, 








James Currier, 








Charles McCoy, 








Ephriam Davis, 








John Davis, 








Allen Emery, 








Ebenezer Fry, 








Benjamin Gould, 








Benjamin Kidder, 








Allen Kidder, 








Isaac Johonnet, 








John Kies, 






Nathan Merrill, 






Benj. Mabury, 








David Mackey, 








James Ordway, 








Loammi Reed, 








Thomas Smith, 








Jonathan Wren, 








John Urin, 








Isaac Grant, 








George Colson, 






Deserted May 12, 1815 
— due him 26 cts. 


James Emerson, 






Deserted Mav 12, 1812 
—due him S10.83. 


William Hoit, 






In civil confinement. 


David Hoit, 






Died Ap. 27, '13,— du 
him S5.60. 


Nathan Stearns, 






Died Ap. 9, '13,— du 
him S2.13. 


George Sias, 






Died Mav 17, 1813- 
him S12.12. 


David Hart, 








David Dudley, 






Deserted Mav 12, 1813 
—due him S2.93. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 81 

Meantime, January 29, 1813, Congress had repealed the 
"Volunteer Act," under -which the regiment had been 
raised, and it was literally disbanded. But the soldiers 
had been enlisted for the term of one year, and were held. 
The same fate attended other regiments, among them one 
from Maine under Col. Denny McCobb, and the result was, 
that many of the volunteers enlisted in the regular service, 
while the remnants of the two regiments were consolidated, 
and formed "the 45th U. S. Regiment;" Col. McCobb of 
the volunteer regiment from Maine, being commissioned as 
Colonel of the new regiment, and Col. Davis of the volun- 
teer regiment from New Hampshire, as its Lieutenant- 
Colonel. The field and staff was as follows : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS OF THE 45TH REGIMENT. 

Denny McCobb,* Colonel. 
Aquila Davis, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
H. B. Breevoort, 1st Major. 
Daniel Baker, 2d Major. 
Joseph Low, Paymaster. 
Daniel G. Kelley, Sergeant-Major. 

♦Colonel Denny McCobb was from the District of Maine, and had command of a 
regiment of volunteers from that District, raised under the Volunteer Act of Congress, 
in 1812. When that regiment was broken up by the repeal of that act, he was ap- 
pointed to the command of the new regiment, or 45th U. S. Infantry, formed by con- 
solidating the Maine and New Hampshire volunteer regiments, as seen above. After 
the return of peace, Colonel McCobb settled in Maine, and as late as January, 1841, was 
the Collector of Customs for the District of Waldeboro, Me. 

6 



82 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Benjamin Bradford's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Benjamin Bradford, Capt. 


April 21, 1814 






Daniel Gregg, 1st. Lieut. 


" 






John W. Cushing, 2d Lieut. 
William Kendall, Ensign, 


" 






" 






William Rumrill, Sergeant, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 




Isaac Bell, 


•' 




Reduced to the ranks. June 


Robert Marsh, " 


" 


" 


18, 1814. by sentence of a 


Ephraim Smith, " 


" 


" 


Court Martial. 


Plummer Wheeler, " 


it 


" 




Moses M. Lakin, " 


March 9, 1814 


During war 


Promoted to Sergt., June 


Zadoc P. Dow, Corporal, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 


18, 1814. and pay due him 


Isaiah Hoit, " 


" 


" 


from March 9, 1814. 


Samuel Davis, 


April 7, 1814 


During war 


Reduced to the ranks. May 


Ezekiel Rohy, " 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 


21, 1814. On commission 


Stephen G. Eaton, " 


" 


" 


alter deserters. 


John Clark, " 


Jan. 7, 1814 


5 years 




John G. Lakin, " 


March 9, 1814 


During war 




David Bell, Musician, 


" 


One year 


Promoted to corporal. May 


John Choate, " 


Feb. 1, 1814 




21, 1814. On commission 
after deserters. 


PRIVATES. 








Joseph Avery, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 


Absent, sick at Wendall. N 


George Ball, 


17 


" 


H. 


Nathan Brown, 


14 


During Avar 




William Bailey, 


Jan. 11,1814 


" 




David Bagley, 


Dec. 15,1813 


One year 




Thomas Baker, 


Eeb. 18, 1814 


During war 




Truman Blanchard, 


1 


One year 




Jonathan Burbank, 


April 15 


During war 




Jeremiah S. Briant, 


12 


" 




Francis Bowman, 


1 


" 




Joseph Bennett, 


9 


" 




Isaac Colby, 


20 


" 




Timothy Carpenter, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 




Samuel Caswell, 


April 11, 1814 


During war 




Calvin Call, 


Mar. 28 


5 years 




Samuel Clogston, 


Dec. 14 


One year 




Benjamin Curtis, 


Feb. 25 


During war 




Bradbury Chase, 


26 






Moses Corser, 


22 


« 




Samuel J. Craft, 


Mar. 6 


a 




George W. Chase, 


26 


a 




William Cole, 


10 


tl 


Pav due him from March 


William Dockham, 


Dec. 16, 1813 


One year 


10, 1814. 


John Dockham, 


Feb. 21, 1814 


During war 




Isaac Davis, 


14 


One year 




Phineas Danforth, 


Mar. 1 


" 




James Dunlap, 


4 


During war 


Pav due him from March 4 


Abel Dufur, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 


1814. 


James Dow, 


Mar. 21, 1814 


During war 




Daniel Emery, 


Dec. 24, 1813 


One year 




Reuben Emerson, 


April 18, 1814 


5 years 




Joshua Eland ers, 


Feb. 21 


During war 




Edward Fletch, 


Mar. 16 






diaries Fairbank, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 




William Greenlief, 


April 11, 1814 


During war 




Henry T. Hildreth, 


Jan. 24 


One year 




James A. Hastings, 


Dec. 15, 1813 






David Hilliard, 


Mar. 21, 1814 


During war 


Absent, sick at Concord. N 


Joseph Hilliard, 


May 16 


" 


H. 


Benjamin Hopkins, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 




Jacob Jones, 


Feb. 28. 1814 


During war 




David Leslie, 


Dec. 15. 1813 


One year 




George Leslie, 


Eeb. 28, 1814 


" 




Simon Lovett, 


Dec. 15, 1813 






Winthrop M. Lowell, 


April 14, 1S14 


During war 




John McLaughlin, 


5 






Joseph Maxiield, 


Dec. 15,1813 


One year 




William Miller, 


April 1, 1814 


During war 


Absent, sick at Concord, N 


John Morrill, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


One year 


i H. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 83 

Koll of Capt. Bradford's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Daniel Muzzy, 


Dec. 


15, 1813 


One year 




Samuel Mudget, 


Feb. 


28, 1814 


During war 


Deserted June 15, 1814. 


Benjamin Mason, 


April 


19 


" 




James L. Morrison, 


Feb. 


26 


" 




James Osmer, 


March 


18 


a 




Joseph Owens, 




15 


" 




Nelson Patterson, 


Dec. 


17, 1813 


One year 


Enlisted into the 11th Regt 


Benjamin Putney, 


Feb. 


28, 1814 


During war 


June 10, 1814. 


William Presbury, 


Dec. 


15, 1813 


One year 




JolmPressey, 


March 


22, 1814 


During war 


Died May 4th, 1814. 


Joseph Quimby, 


Dec. 


15, 1813 


One year 




John Roby, 


March 


21, 1814 


During war 




David Roach, 


Eeb. 


24 


" 




John Stewart, 1st, 




23 


" 




John Stewart, 2d, 




28 


a 




Lewis Stone, 


April 


5 


a 




Jonathan Stevens, 


Dec. 


15, 1813 


One year 


Absent, sick at Warner, N 


Buswell Silver, 


March 


23, 1814 


During war 


H. 


Dudley Trumball, 


A.pril 


25 


" 




Moses Tenney, 


Jan. 


24 


One year 




John Taggart, 


Feb. 


21 


During war 




Bradbury Wilkinson, 


Dec. 


15, 1813 


One year 




Beniah Woodward, 


Feb. 


15, 1814 


" 




Theodore G. Wallace, 




25 


During war 




Ira Whitcomb, 


March 


9, 1814 


" 




David Woods, 




a 


a 


Confined in Provost Guard. 


Joseph Pillsbury, 


Dec. 


21, 1813 


One year 


Absent, sick at Springfield. 


James Bursiel, 


May 


9, 1S14 


During war 


N. H. 


Samuel Carr, 




4 


" 





84 adjutant-general's report. 

Pay Roll of Capt. Joseph Flander's Company. 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Flanders, Captain, Jan. 


1, 1814 


Feb. 28, 1814 




Jona. Butterfield, 1st Lieut 




1 


" 




Marshall Baker, 2d Lieut. 




1 


" 




Enoch Page, Ensign, 




1 


" 




Jeremiah Hutchins, Sergt. 


Dec. 


15, 1813 






John McClary, " 




19 


" 




John Carter, " 




16 


" 




William Orr, " 


Feb. 


19, 1814 






James Stevens, Corporal, 


Dec. 


17, 1813 






Seth E. Clark, " 




29 


" 




William Liecester, " 




19 


" 




Noah Kidder, Musician, 




17 


" 




PRIVATES. 










John Andres, 


Dec. 


19,1813 


Feb. 28,1814 




Thomas Hook, 




29 


" 




Thomas Leavitt, 




17 


" 




Nathaniel Merrill, 




16 


" 




Amos Judd, 




17 


" 




John Keyes, 




16 


" 




Aaron Clark, 




15 


" 




David Mackey, 




15 


« 




Zenas Adams, 




16 


IS 




John Davis, 




17 


" 




Isaac Johannett, 




17 


" 




John Elliott, 




17 


a 




Isaac Grant, 




16 


(t 




Daniel Palmer, 




16 


" 




James Ordway, 




17 


u 




Ephraim Kidder, 




15 


it 




Noah Clark, 




19 


" 




Samuel Andrews, 




16 


it 




Robert Finican, 




29 


" 




Jonathan Severance, 




18 


" 




Luther Brown, 




15 


a 




Ebenezer Page, 




17 


" 




Charles McCoy, 




17 


a 




James Emerson, 




19 


<( 




George T. Flanders, 




19 


" 




John Urin, 




16 


" 




Thomas Smith, 




16 


it 




Allen Emery, 




17 


" 




John Amey, 




15 


" 




Jewett Palmer, 




18 


a 




James Folsom, 


Jan. 


27, 1814 


" 




John Cushing, 


Dec. 


29, 1813 


" 




Jonas Kyes, 


Feb. 


1, 1814 


" 




John Small, 




26 


(( 




Charles F. Livingston, 




24 


« 




William Carter, 




16 


« 




Robert Walker, 




24 


a 




John Livingston, 




10 


a 




Jesse Christie, 




3 


" 




David Magney, 




2 


it 




Leavitt Hook, 




2 


a 




Oliver Senter, 




28 


" 




Isaac Silver, 




26 


" 




Richard Silver, 




17 


« 




Isaac Aldrich, 




23 


" 




William Hoyt, 


Dec. 


9, 1813 


" 




Charles Gage, ] 


Feb. 


23, 1814 


" 




Parker Brown, 


17 


" 




Benjamin Baily, 


18 


a 





MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



85 



Roll op Capt. Nathan Stanley's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. For what time 



Eemarks. 



Nathan Stanley, Captain, 
Andrew P. Cochran, 1st Lt, 
Dennis Patch, 2d Lt. 
John Neal, jr., Ensign, 
David Her r in, Sergeant, 
David Doe, " 

Thomas Lowell, " 
Asa Gould, " 

Stephen Pearce, " 
William Healee, Corporal, 
Moses Michels, " 

Isaac Gilley, " 

Levi Cooper, " 

Ebenezer B. Gillrey, " 
William Haney, " 

Abner Loomis, Musician, 

PRIVATES. 

Samuel Adams, 
William Annis, 
David Bump, 
John Butterheld, 
Nicholas Beale, 
Ebenezer Burges, 
Beniah Brown, 
John Bickmore, 
Lott Conant, 
Stephen Cook, 
Frederic Cook, 
Jacob Carlton, 
John Cane, 
Daniel Carlton, 
Thomas Crockett, 
Ebenezer Cobb, 
Dunham Campbell, 
Martin Curtis, 
Fessenden Chase, 
John Denin, 
John Danforth, 
Stephen Davis, 
Matthew Daggett, 
Joseph Davis, 
Shubael Davis, 
William Davis, 
Coburn Emerson, 
William Fenley, 
Robert York, 
William Fullington, 
John McLee, 
William Gwin, 
Levi Gould, 
John Greenough, 
John Gould, 
Levi Greenleaf, 
Jewett Goodwin, 
Joseph Harris, 
John Hall, 
Daniel Hardy, 
John E. Hinkley, 
Samuel Higgins, 
Elijah Higgins, 
Elijah Hunter, 
Levi Hobbs, 
William Hunter, 
William Higgins, 
Temple H. Hoit, 
Dominicus Hodgdon, 
John Jones, 
Robert Jones, 
Nathan Johnson, 



April 



Dec. 

March 

Dec. 

March 



Dec. 
March 



1814 



21. 

21 

21 

21 

30, 1813 

30 

14, 1814 

16, 1813 

25, 1814 

26 

17 

30, 1813 

23, 1814 

28 

17 

28 



March 15, 1814 

20 
April 4 
9 
March 21 

28 

29 

20 

22 
April 12 
March 14 
April 6 
6 

24 

24 
9 

10 
1 
March 15 

25 



April 

March 
April 



March 



April 
March 17 
April 19 
Dec. 17, 1813 
March 15, 1814 

20 

29 
April 9 
March 14 
Ipril 9 
6 
March 21 



April 



March 



1 year 
During war 

1 year 

5 years 

During war 

1 year 

During war 



During war 



5 years 
During war 



On command. 



1 year 
During war 



During war 



On furlough. 



86 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Stanley's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Eliphalet Jordan, 


Mar. 26, 1814 


During war. 




Ebenezer Jackman, 


April 30 


<< 




Daniel Kimball, 


11 


" 


Absent without leave. 


John B. Knight, 


Feb. 21 


a 




Thomas Kinney, 


Mar. 20 


" 




James B. Lyon, 


28 


" 




Benjamin Libbey, 


21 


a 




Stephen Lombard, 


April 7 


" 




Win. McPheters, 


16 


a 




Jonathan Michells, 


3 


" 




James Murray, 


9 


a 




James Means, 


Mar. 12 


" 




Paul Nute, jr. 


April 9 


a 




Thomas Newell, 


Mar. 22 


a 




Nathan Pratt, 


April 20 


" 




Andrew Potter, 


9 


5 years 




Andrew Potter, jr. 


20 






Richard Powers, 


Mar. 14 


During war 




Joseph Remick, 


17 


" 




Thomas Rankins, 


23 


" 




Daniel Rines, 


28 


" 




Benjamin Ramsey, 


19 


5 years 




Zacheus Richardson, 


25 


" 




Solomon Sculley, 


18 


During war 




Millard Spaulding, 


25 


" 




Charles Stewart, 


20 


" 




Israel Spiner, 


18 


" 




Allen Smith, 


April 16 


" 




Caleb Taylor, 


Mar. 25 


" 




Dudley H- Lay ton, 


14 


" 




Wm. toothaker, 


22 


(i 




Luther Turner, 


Feb. 3 


" 




Asa Thompson, 


Mar. 10 


" 




Moses H. Wardwell, 


April 25 


<( 




Robert L. Wheelwright, 


9 


" 




James Wilson, 


Mar. 20 


" 




Elias M. Kinney, 


April 9 


" 





military history of new-hampshire. 87 

Roll of Capt. Smith Elkin's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Kemarks. 




Smith Elkins, Captain,' 


Apr. 21, 


1314 


During war 






T. B. Sylvester, 1st Lieut. 


21 




it 






D. G. Kelley, Sgt. Maj. 


Mar. 29 




" 


Re-enlisted Mar. 19, 1814 


Joseph Hart well, Sergt. 


Dec. 15, 


1813 


" 






Zach. Norton, jr. " 


Mar. 24, 


1814 


ee 


Supernumary. 




William Watson, " 


11 




11 


Supernumary. 




James Costellow, " 


21 




a 


Supernumary. 




Samuel Costellow, " 


14 




11 


Supernumary. 




Mark Hutchinson, " 


29 




a 






Alexander Lerow, " 


31 




a 






Jacob Luf kin, " 


Apr. 12 




a 






Peter Lyon, jr. " 


19 




" 


Supernumary. 




Joseph Hayes, " 


Mar. 9 




a 


Supernumary. 




Wm. McFaclden, " 


14 




a 


Supernumary. 




Mark Ridout, 


14 




a 


Supernumary. 




Wm. Stanwood, " 


Dec. 18, 


1813 


1 year 






George Curtis, Corporal, 


Feb. 2, 


1814 


During war 






John Gove, " 


22 




" 






Dan'l Holden, jr. " 


Apr. 29 




a 






Eben'r White, Musician, 


Mar. 31 




a 






William Holden, " 


Apr. 18 




" 


Re-enlisted. 




PRIVATES. 












Joseph Anderson, 


Mar. 7 




During war 






Samuel Boynton, 


Apr. 19 




" 






Jonathan Haskell, 


9 




" 






Henry R. How, 


Mar. 21 




a 






Solomon Hatch, 


1G 




a 


Absent, sick. 




Fry Lovejoy, 


Dec. 15, 


1813 


1 year 


Absent, sick. 




James Merrill, 


Mar. 16, 


1814 


During war 






Stephen Milliken, 


Apr. 19 




" 






John Olds, 


19 




" 






Wm. H. Pruden, 


30 




a 






James Sweet, 


29 




a 






William Stout, 


Mar. 14 




« 






Eben'r Stanwood, 


Dec. 15, 


1813 


1 year 






Daniel Thurston, 


Apr. 18, 


1814 


During war 






John Kirby, 


Dec. 18, 


1813 


1 year 


At Burlington. 




Clemmons Eaton, 


Mar. 7, 


1814 


During war 






Thomas Crowell, 


Apr. 27 




" 







adjutant-general s report. 
Roll of Capt. Daniel Holden's Company. 



Names. 



Remarks. 



Daniel Holden, Captain, 
Henry Snow, 1st Lieut. 
Samuel Sylvester, 2d Lieut. 
Jonas G. Brooks, Ensign, 
Artemus Heald, Sergeant, 
Elisha Jewett, " 

Aleaza Cushman, " 
William Erskine, " 
Joseph Erskine, Corporal, 
David Green, 
John Henderson, " 
Isaac Small, " 

Joseph Butterfield, " 
Thomas Conant, " 
Hannibal Proctor, Music'n 
Samuel Boynton, " 

PRIVATES. 

Geo. B. Anderson, 
Nicholas Arter, 
Ebenezer Allby, 
Benjamin Allen, 
James Benton, 
Moses Brown, 
John Barnes, 
William Baker, 
Nathan Chapman, 
Jonathan Cabman, 
Joseph Creesey, 
Ebenezer Cobb, 
William Colby, 
John Chesley, 
Richard Coombs, 
Josiah Colcord, 
Ebenezer Cogswell, 
James Coffin, 
Thomas Clark, 1st, 
Stephen Cromwell, 
Bryant McCarty, 
Thomas Clark, 2d, 
John Clark, 
Patrick Darcey, 
Ichabod Delano, 
John Erskine, 
Nathan Eaton, 
Robert Erskine, 
Ebenezer Erskine, 
David Erskine, 
Robert Erskine, 2d, 
James Foy, 
Jacob Foy, 
Alexander Fuller, 
Zenas Fuller, 
Ephraim K. Garland, 
David Henry, 
Samuel Hinkley, 
William Hatch, 
John Hamlin, 
Nathaniel Hussey, 
Henry Hussey, 
Josiah Hall, 
William Hopkins. 
Benjamin Howard, 
Benjamin Jackson, 
William Jackson, 
James Kincard, 
Andrew Knowlton, 
John Leaton, 
James Lampson, 
Robert Lint, 



April 21, 1814 

21 

21 

21 
Mar. 24 
Dec. 10, 1813 
Mar. 9, 1814 
Feb. 28 
April 10 
April 18 
Mar. 21 
Jan. 15 
April 20 

30 
Mar. 15 

16 



April 19, 1814 
Feb. 9 
Mar. 26 
April 20 
Feb. 22 
April 6 

19 
Mar. 9 

14 

26 

16 

16 
April 18 
Mar. 23 

16 

18 
Dec. 22, 1813 
April 9, 1814 
Mar. 28 

31 
April 28 

26 

26 
Mar. 16 
April 14 

15 
Mar. 12 
April 9 

22 

22 

16 
Mar. 17 
April 21 
Mar. 19 
April 9 
Feb. 14 
Dec. 15, 1813 
Mar. 18, 1814 

28 
April 19 

19 
Mar. 23 
April 15 

21 
Mar. 14 

19 
April 16 
Mar. 26 
April 18 
Mar. 15 
April 18 
Mar. 14 



During war 

1 year 
During war 



During war 



I Ordered to Bath by Col. 
[ Denny McCobb. 



1 year 
During war 



Deserted, time unknown. 

Sick at Albany. 

On command at Chazy. 



Sick at Bath. 



Sick at Concord, N. H. 
Sick at Bath. 



1 year 
During war 



Sick at Bath. 



Sick at Bath. 

Deserted, time unknown. 



Deserted from the 4th Regi- 
ment ; reclaimed bv Capt. 
E. Way, June 17, 1814. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 89 

Roll of Capt. Holden's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Samuel Lishenness, 


Mar. 17, 1814 


During war 




William Meserve, 


April 10 


" 




James Morton, 


16 


" 




George L. Miller, 


Mar. 16 


" 




John Morton, 


April 18 


a 




Samuel Montgomery, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


1 year 


Re-enlisted, time unknown. 


John Munsey, 


Mar. 28, 1814 


During war 


Sick at Eath. 


Joseph Munsey, 


28 


" 




Solomon Meserve, 


April 6 


a 




Spencer Nelson, 


10 


n 




Henry Nelson, 


10 


" 




Edward Peters, 


Mar. 17 


" 




Samuel Rice, 


April 6 


" 




Ammi Ross, 


Mar. 15 


" 


Sick at Bath. 


Daniel Stewart, 


Dec. 24, 1813 


1 year 


Re-enlisted into 2d Regi- 


William Simpson, 


Mar. 15, 1814 


During war 


ment, time unknown. 


Robert Sedgley, 


19 


" 




Lemuel Small, 


17 


tt 




Nath. Stephens, 


14 


a 




Francis Small, 


15 


" 




Timothy Storer, 


17 


it 




Nathaniel Smith, 


28 


(l 




John Trask, 


April 19 


" 


Deserted, time unknown. 


Joseph Taylor, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


1 year 




Clarkson Turner, 


Mar. 19,1814 


During war 




Timothy Tibbett, 


April 1 


" 




Solomon Teague, 


Mar. 26 


" 




Jeremiah Winslow, 


19 


a 




James Wiley, 


April 25 


a 




Samuel White, 


Feb. 22 


ft 




Benjamin Waldo, 


April 9 


11 




Samuel Yeats, 


10 


• " 


- 


Ezekiel Higgins, 


Mar. 26 


tt 




Wait Weeks, 


April 24 


" 




Thomas Thompson , 


Mar. 26 


(i 




Hamraon Rogers, Waiter, 


June 1 


" 





90 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Sergt. Major Kelley's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


D. G. Kellcy, Sergt. Maj. 


Dec. 11, 1813 


1 year 




Reuben Turner, Sergt. 


a 


" 




Elisha Jewett, " 


a 


a 




Francis Gardner, Corp. 


T an. 11, 1814 


a 




Luther Turner, Private, 


Feb. 3 


During war 




Jame^ Getchell, " 


Jan. 13 


1 year 




Nathan Pratt, 


Dec. 16, 1813 


" 




William Lord, 


u 


it 




Noodis Royal, " 


" 


" 




David Herrin, Sergt. 


30 


" 




David Doe, " 


a 


a 




Jonathan Priest, Private, 


tt 


" 




Isaac Gilley, 


it 


tt 




Elias McKinney, " 


" 


it 




Isaac Condon, " 


ti 


ti 




Asa Gould, Sergeant, 


15 


" 




James Johnson, Private, 


20 


" 




Eben'r Cogswell, " 


22 


tt 


On furlough. 


Daniel Crockett, " 


19 


a 


Confined by civil authc 


James Coffin, 


29 


it 


rity, since released. 


Joseph Heartwell, Sergt. 


15 


During war 




PRIVATES. 








Joseph Bailey, 


Dec. 15, 1813 


1 year 




Daniel Knight, 


" 


it 




John Moor, 


" 


a 




Samuel Montgomery, 


" 


a 




Hezekiah Lombard, 


" 


" 




David Henry, 


a 


" 




John Trask, 


a 


" 




John Walker, 


n 


" 




Frye Lovejoy, 


it 


" 




David Dudley, 


it 


" 




Daniel Hoclgdon, 


tt 


n 




Paul Nute, 


19 


" 




Robert L. Wheelwright, 


" 


" 




Clemons Eaton, 


20 


a 


Sick at Bowdoingham. 


Eben'r Cobb, 


15 


" 




Joseph Trumbull, 


a 


ti 




John Butterfield, 


" 


n 




Joseph Butterfield, 


ti 


a 




Benj. Maines, 


a 


" 




John B. Knight, 


it 


tt 




Stephen Foot, 


a 


a 


Absent at Wilton. 


Stephen Lombard, 


tt 


" 




Win. Fenley, 


17 


" 




John Morgan, 


" 


a 




Caleb B. Barrows, 


tt 


ti 




Southard Shaw, 


15 


a 


On furlough. 


Jonathan Michael, 


" 


it 




Robert Jones, 


a 


a 




Eben'r Stan wood, 


tt 


a 




Eben'r White, 


(€ 


tt 




John Jones, 


14 


" 


On furlough. 


Hugh Blaisdell, 


16 


" 


On furlough. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



91 



Roll of Sergt. Major Kelley's Company — concluded. 




Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Sam'l Sennett, 


Dec. 16, 1813 


1 year 






John Kirby, 


18 


" 






lohn Simmons, 


" 


" 






John Taylor, 


u 


" 






Joseph Erskine, Corp. 


22 


(< 






Hobert Erskine, 


a 


tt 






3enj. Waldo, 


it 


it 






Daniel Stewart, 


n 


" 






3-eorge R. Anderson, 


Feb. 9, 1814 


During war 






[ohn Gove, 


22 


tt 






ames Bunton, 


it 


" 






fames Wiley, 


18 


" 






3-eorge Curtis, 


2 


tt 






Sphraim K. Garland, 


4 


" 






iVilliam Erskine, Corp. 


21 


1 year 






ohn Erskine, 


3 


" 






?elatian Witham, 


Jan. 27 


n 






kVm. Stanwood, Sergt. 


Dec. 20, 1813 


" 






Daniel Holden, jr. Corp. 


Jan. 1, 1814 


" 






ohn Henderson, " 


15 


a 






■samuel Wood, Eifer, 


1 


During war 






Nicholas Delchow, 


Dec. 27, 1813 


tt 






>ylvanus Cushman, 


Feb. 28, 1814 


" 






ohn Laclair, 


Jan. 4 


tt 


^ 




fohn May, 


1 


1 year 






Michael Sweny, 


Dec. 30, 1813 


" 






»Vm. Wymouth, 


Jan. 29, 1814 


" 






lannibal Proctor, Mus'n, 


Dec. 1, 1813 


tt 







The above roll is a detachment of recruits mustered into service at Portland, Me., by 
3ol. McCobb, and very many of the names appear on preceding rolls, but since all do 
tot, it is deemed advisable to insert the entire roll. 



92 adjutant-general's report. 

At the expiration of the term of service of the " on 
year's men," or the soldiers from the " 1st N. H. regimen 
of volunteers," and those from the regiment of volunteer 
from the " District of Maine," various officers from th 
45th were sent into New-Hampshire to fill up the regimen 
by recruits. The regiment was filled in a short tim( 
through the efforts of Paymaster Low, who had been d( 
tailed for that service, and early in the spring of 1814, wa 
at Burlington for service. 

On the first of December, 1812, there being less fear c 
an attack upon Portsmouth at this season of the year, th 
detached troops at Forts McClary and Constitution unde 
Major Bassett were discharged. 

In conformity to the suggestion of the Governor, th 
Legislature, Dec. 22, 1812, passed an act establishing th 
pay of men detached, or to be detached, including the pa 
from the General Government at the following rates : 
Sergeant Major, $13 per month. 
Quartermaster Sergeant, $13 per month. 
Principal Musician, $12 per month. 
Sergeant, $12 per month. 
Corporal, $11 per month. 
Private, $10 per month. 

And it was also provided that the towns that had paid 
or should pay, their detached soldiers extra pay to th' 
amount paid by the General Government, should be re 
funded by the State to the amount per month for each sol 
dier as specified above. 

As before stated,* a law was passed at this session fo 
organizing a " Voluntary Corps of Infantry," to be com 
posed of such men as were not liable by law to do militar 
duty. This corps was subject only to be ordered out by th 
Captain-General, except in case of an invasion, when the; 
were to be subject to the orders of the commander then ii 
the field. Companies were organized under this law ii 
many of the large towns, but they were not called hit 
service. 

*Sea Adjutant-General's Report for 1866, Vol. II, p. 393. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



93 



The time of service of Capt. Mahurin's company, stationed 
at Stewartstown, expiring with January, 1813, Gen. Mont- 
gomery of the " Western Brigade," was ordered by the 
Governor to detach another company to occupy that post. 
[n obedience to that order, Gen. Montgomery ordered Capt. 
Edmund Freeman, of Lebanon, to march for that post with 
x detachment. Capt. Freeman received his orders, March 
11, 1813, and the roll of his company was as follows : 



Eoll of Capt. Edmund Freeman's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


Discharged. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Mmund Freeman, Captain, 


April 1, 1813 


Oct. 6, 1813 


Lebanon. 


s eter Eastman, Lieutenant, 


6 


" 


Coventry. 


Vm. H. Latham, Ensign, 


4 


a 


Lyme. 


: oel Hemmingway, Sergt. 


21 


11 


Lancaster. 


)avid Turner, " 


26 


" 


Lyme. 


Jharles Tenny, " 


26 


" 


Hanover. 


'ohn L. Bobbins, " 


16 


" 


Plymouth. 


/Villiam Hall, Corporal, 


26 


" 


Hanover. 


]lisha H. Blodget, " 


26 


tt 


Lebanon. 


*eter H. Gamsby, " 


21 


" 


Stratford. 


it oses Burnham, " 


16 


it 


Rumney. 


VireMcConnell, Drummer, 


26 


a 


Lyme. 


teplien Hayes, Fifer, 


26 


" 


Lyme. 


PRIVATES. 








Lmasa Blodgett, 


June 26, 1813 


Oct. 6, 1813 


Lebanon. 


^benezer Brainard, 


9 


" 


Lebanon. 


ilas Curtis, 


10 


" 


Lebanon. 


Lnios Dart, 


April 21 


<t 


Colebrook. 


Merce Fobes, 


26 


tt 


Lyme. 


'orter Fobes, 


26 


" 


Lvme. 


amuel Fuller, 


27 


»< 


Stratford. 


osepli W. Green, 


26 


" 


Lebanon. 


]rasmus Hatch, 


16 


" 


Thornton. 


Edward Hatch, 


26 


" 


Lyme, 


rustavus A. Hall, 


25 


it 


Lancaster. 


lenry Hall, 3d, 


16 


tt 


Rumney. 


'rescott Hall, 


16 


it 


Plymouth. 


ohn Holbrook, 


June 7 


a 


Lebanon. 


"'rench Hall, 


25 


n 


Lyme. 


Sreo. W. Moore, 


April 25 


a 


Lancaster. 


saac Mitchell, 


16 


a 


Plymouth. 


Lmasa Page, 


25 


a 


Lancaster. 


ohn Perkins, 


21 


n 


Lancaster. 


>aul Percival, 


16 


a 


Campton. 


'eter P. Paine, 


26 


" 


Lebanon. 


)aniel Perkins, 


July 1 


a 


Hanover. 


"ohn Perry, 


Mav 17 


« 


Lebanon. 


lesse Rice, 


April 26 


tt 


Lyme. 


[enry Stiles, 


" 




Stratford. 


oseph Smith, 


" 


" 


Elanover. 


loses Straw, 


tt 


tt 


Lyme. 


amuel Sargent, 


23 


" 


Stewartstown. 


avid Taylor, 


23 




Lancaster. 


diphaletTaylor, 


June 10 




Lyme. 


ohn Turrill, 


April 22 




Stewartstown. 


enjamin Upham, 


25 




Lancaster. 


amuel Welsh, 


26 




Lyme. 


Ji Wood. 


26 


it 


Lebanon. 


toward Wheeler, 


July 1 


" 


Hanover. 



94 



adjutant-general's report. 



In the spring of 1813, great alarm existed among thi 
people of Portsmouth, and April 20, 1813, Gov. Plume 
ordered another detachment for the defense of Portsmouth 
This was a company of " Sea Fencibles," under commani 
of Capt. Wm. Marshall, of the 35th Regiment. This com 
pany was stationed at Little Harbor, and its roll was a 
follows : 



Roll op Capt. "William Marshall's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Wm. Marshall, Captain, 


May 27,1813 


Nov. 27, 1813 




John Eoy, Ensign, 


<< 


tt 




Joseph Locke, Sergeant, 


(( 


a 




James Mullen, Corporal, 


n 


a 




Samuel Foss, Musician, 


" 


(( 




George Neal, " 


(( 


it 




PRIVATES. 








John C. Yeaton, 


May 27, 1813 


Nov. 27, 1813 




William Neal, 


tt 


it 




Edward Yeaton, 


" 


« 




Richard Yeaton, 


a 


" 




John R. Mullin, 


<< 


n 




Isaac S. Yeaton, 


" 


tt 




William Neal, jr. 


it 


" 




Daniel Locke, 


tt 


(C 




Benjamin Oliver, 


<< 


it 




Joseph Tarlton, 


tt 


<( 




William Kimme, 


" 


" 




Benjamin Kimme, 


tt 


Aug. 31 




John McGridge, 


Aug. 31 


Nov. 27 




Benjamin Tarlton, 


May 27 


" 




Abraham Trefethen, 


" 


Sept. 6 




Benjamin Eoss, 


Sept. 6 


Nov. 27 




Meshack Bell, 


May 27 


tt 




John Martin, 


(t 


« 




John Card, 


a 


« 




Samuel Narrell, 


<( 


Oct. 13 




Henry Trefethen, 


Oct. 13 


Nov. 27 




Ithamar Mace, 


May 27 


" 




Edward Hall, 


tt 


u 




William Tucker, 


tt 


tt 




Mark Webster, 


a 


tt 




Samuel Odiorne, 


" 


tc 




Jonathan Woodman, 


« 


a 




Nicholas Mason, 


tt 


it 




Benjamin Lear, 


tt 


n 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 95 

But the fears of the people were not allayed, as British 
cruisers still hovered continually upon the coast ; and May 
20, 1813, a town meeting was held in Portsmouth, at 
which it was voted, after much discussion, to instruct their 
Bepresentatives to lay before the Legislature " the exposed 
situation of that town and harbor ; and endeavor to obtain 
such assistance from the Legislature, as they in their wis- 
dom might think expedient."* 

Meantime active preparations for defense of Portsmouth 
and the sea-board were taken by Governor Plumer. By his 
direction, and in obedience to a resolve of the Legislature, 
Adjutant-General McClary purchased pieces of cannon for 
each of the artillery companies in the 15th, 31st, 34th and 
35th regiments ; and removed quantities of ammunition from 
Exeter to Portsmouth for distribution among the troops, and 
provided munitions of war, and magazines, as required by 
the resolution of the Legislature. 

At the annual election, in March 1813, Ex-Governor John 

* At this meeting, Mr. Daniel Webster made a marked speech. He remarked, that 
"he had heard the discussion with interest; but talk was not what the crisis de- 
manded. The forts near the town want repairs, want men to defend them when re- 
paired. The government of the United States and the State government have been 
applied to for men to repair and defend these forts ; but we know not that either will 
attend to our application, but one thing we do know," said Mr. Webster, " the crisis 
demands labor, and we can labor, we can repair the forts, and then we know an- 
other thing, we can defend them." '• Now," continued Mr. Webster, " 1 propose that 
every man who wants these forts repaired, wants these forts, aye, the town of Ports- 
mouth, defended — appear on the parade to-morrow morning with pick-axe, spade, and 
shovel, and that they go to the Islands, and repair the forts." The meeting adjourned 
with a hurra for the pick-axe, spade, and shovel. The next morning hundreds of the 
patriotic men of Portsmouth gathered upon the parade, and with Mr. Webster, duly 
armed with his shovel, proceeded to the forts, commenced their work, and in two or 
three days the forts were repaired. 

The writer would here state another fact within his knowledge. It has often been 
said, that Mr. Webster was in favor of and supported the Hartford Convention. It was 
not so. It was mainly through his influence that the Federal State Convention de- 
clined sending delegates to that convention. After the refusal to send State delegates 
to that convention, it was proposed to send delegates from the several counties. Judge 
Farrar, of New Ipswich, and Edmund Parker. Charles H. Atherton, and Robert Read, 
Esquires, of Amherst, were of the committee for the County of Hillsborough, and had 
the subject under consideration. 

Judge Farrar wrote Mr. Webster for the committee, asking his advice in the matter. 
Mr. Webster wrote them in answer, that, in his opinion, it was inexpedient for the 
State or the counties to send delegates to the convention about to assemble at Hart- 
ford. That letter was in the hands of the Hon. Charles H. Atherton at the time of his 
death. Mr. Webster had his opinion as to the policy of the administration, but that 
opinion differing from that of the supporters of it, did not constitute a difference of 
principle. He was a true patriot, ready to act when danger threatened. 



96 adjutant-general's report. 

Taylor Gilman* was elected Governor for the ensuing polit- 
ical year. 

Gen. Michael McClary, the Adjutant-General of the State 
since 1792, resigned his commission, and May 18, 1813, 
Col. Benjamin Butler was appointed his successor. 

On Thursday the 5th day of June, 1813, Governor Gil- 
man was duly inaugurated. 

The minority of 1812, had now become the majority. 
Governor Gilman was a patriot and soldier of the Bevolu- 
tion, and conservative in his views as to the war, although 
the standard bearer of the opposition to the war. Xo one 
could find fault with his message. He said in relation to 
the war: " The consequences of the war in which our coun- 
try is engaged cannot be foreseen, and there are divers 
opinions respecting the necessity of the war, as well as the 
causes which induced our government to make the declar- 
ation. Under such circumstances, it may be considered 
not only as the right, but the duty, of the representatives 
of the people to inquire into the causes which have brought 
so great a calamity on our country. We are bound to sup- 
port our system of national government and the laws em- 
anating therefrom ; but this by no means hinders the right 
of free inquiry, or the full expression of sentiments upon 
the measures of government. 

Indeed, such inquiry may be a duty, not only as we are a 
member of the Union, but as respects rights exclusively ap- 
pertaining to the State. 

It is not doubted, that we have had great causes of com- 
plaint against both Great Britain and France, and perhaps 
at some former period much greater against one or both of 
those governments, than existed against the British at the 
time of the declaration of war. * * * *. While we 
demand redress for injuries received from others, we should 
suitably regard their just expectations from us ; and may 
we not, without being liable to the charge of justifying the 
conduct of Great Britain, inquire whether they have no 

*For notice of Governor Gilman, see Adjt. General's Report for 1866, Vol. n, p. 381. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 97 



just cause of complaint against our government ? Whether 
our professions of strict and impartial neutrality, in the 
important contest between Great Britain and France had 
been constantly maintained ? And whether there had not 
been a manifest difference in our resentments, and in the 
language and manner of seeking redress for wrongs, ex- 
hibiting an unwarrantable partiality for France ? What- 
ever inquiries may be made, or opinions given, let us exer- 
cise candor and moderation ; and constantly bear in mind, 
that those who differ from us in opinion possess equal rights. " 

The answer of the House was a mere echo of the Gov- 
ernor's speech, and the minority entered no protest to the 
same. 

The instructions of the town of Portsmouth were 
brought before the House early in the session, and a com- 
mittee was appointed to take into consideration the situa- 
tion of our maritime frontier, and report such a general 
system of defense as might be deemed proper. The com- 
mittee after examination reported that there was no ade- 
quate defense of our maritime frontier. 

They said, " Forts Constitution and McClary, at the en- 
trance of Portsmouth harbor, are considered when fully 
manned, capable of resisting with effect, any probable force 
that may be sent against them. But at this time one hun- 
dred and twenty men compose the whole force of both 
garrisons, and it is not yet ascertained that the General 
Government will add to that force. Fort McClary being 
within the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, it may be presumed an additional force will be pro- 
vided by that government, if requested by us. The further 
defense provided by the United States consists of several 
gunboats manned by seventy-two seamen who are consid- 
ered as a guard for the Navy Yard. Six 18 and 24 pound- 
ers mounted on travelling carriages, are deposited in the 
United States Gun-House at Portsmouth, with one thou- 
sand stand of arms exclusive of those belonging to the State. 
A guard of two officers and thirty non-commissioned offi- 
cers and privates was ordered by Governor Plumer on the 

7 



98 adjutant-general's report. 

20th of May last, and is now stationed at Little Harbor. 
Two nine-pounders were ordered to be mounted for the de- 
fense of that post, which order has been complied with. 
Eight six-pounders belonging to the State are also fit for 
service. It appears to the Committee that a sufficiency of 
the munitions of war are in readiness for the defense of 
the sea-coast of this State, excepting cartouch boxes, bay- 
onet sheaths and belts, and an additional number of cart- 
ridges for the artillery and small arms." 

Acting upon the information reported by the committee, 
the Legislature authorized the Governor, in case of inva- 
sion or apprehension thereof, to call forth such portions of 
the militia of the State as might be necessary to prevent 
such invasion and promptly to repel it. He was also au- 
thorized in such case, to distribute the arms and ammunition 
to such persons and in such manner as he should think 
proper, provided such arms were returned when the militia 
were disbanded. 

In August, the people of Portsmouth became apprehen- 
sive of an attack upon the town, and application was made 
to the Governor for powder, balls, &c. Accordingly on the 
20th of August the Governor " directed the Commissary- 
General to receive at Exeter and remove to Portsmouth two 
hundred and fifty pounds of powder and one thousand 
flints ; and in case of any actual invasion of this State, or 
any well grounded apprehension thereof, to deliver the same, 
together with a sufficient quantity of musket balls for the 
powder to the order of General Storer, or the selectmen of 
the town of Portsmouth." 

The 2d of November 1813, the Legislature authorized the 
Governor to " cause to be paid to the officers, non-commis- 
sioned officers and privates, composing the military watch 
or guard stationed near Little Harbor * * * such 
pay and rations as are allowed to the officers and soldiers 
in the service of the United States." 

Capt. William Marshall's company of Sea Fencibles was 
at this time stationed at Little Harbor. Their time of six 
months' service expired the 27th of November. They were 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. \)\) 

discharged at that time. On the same day, Capt. Marshall 
with fourteen of the detached Sea Fencibles, by order of 
the Governor, was continued as a guard at Little Harbor. 
They were discharged Dec. 31, 1813. It does not appear 
that any other detached troops from the State were on duty 
at this time. The roll of this detached company, or guard, 
under Capt. Marshall, was as follows : 

Roll of Capt. William Marshall's Guard. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Wm. Marshall, Captain, 


Nov. 27, 1813 


Dec. 31, 1813 




PKIVATES. 








James Mullin, 


Nov. 27, 1813 


Dec. 31, 1813 




Benjamin Kinnear, 


" 


" 




Joseph S. White, 


" 


u 




George B. Odiorne, - 


" 


a 




John Mugrige, 


a 


" 




Samuel Dunking, 


a 


Nov. 16, 1813 




Samuel Farniel, 


Nov. 17, 1813 


" 




Ebing Farniel, 


Nov. 27, 1813 


Dec. 31, 1813 




Richard Yeaton, 


it 


u 




Edward Yeaton, 


a 


" 




Joseph Talton, 


a 


a 




Edward Shannon, 


" 


tt 




John R. Mullin, 


a 


" 





Meantime the campaign of this year had been prosecuted 
with varied fortune. It commenced with disaster. Tore- 
cover Michigan, so disgracefully lost, Gen. Harrison at- 
tempted a winter campaign. Gen. Winchester of his 
advance marched to Frenchtown, upon the river Eaisin, a 
few miles below Detroit, and drove out of the town and 
neighborhood some three hundred British and Indians. 
The next day, at daybreak, while the American forces were 
encamped in the village and the open fields, they were at- 
tacked by a large force of British and Indians from the 
neighboring fort at Maiden, and after a severe fight were 
forced to surrender — not without promise of protection. 
The next day, however, the wounded prisoners were at- 
tacked by the Indians and most inhumanly slaughtered. 
Six hundred prisoners were in the hands of the British, 



100 adjutant-general's report. 

and three hundred fell in battle, or were murdered by the 
savages. 

To avenge this massacre, other volunteers rushed to the 
assistance of Harrison. He had built Fort Meigs on the 
Miami River. On the first of May, it was invested by Col. 
Proctor from Maiden, with a large force of Indians and 
British. Gen. Clay, at the head of twelve hundred Ken- 
tuckians, came to its relief, and drove the besiegers from the 
works. The Kentuckians, careless and confident of victory, 
were soon attacked by the rallied enemy and put to flight. 
Two or three hundred succeeded in getting into the fort ; 
about three hundred were killed or taken prisoners, and the 
rest fled to the nearest settlements. Those in the fort 
made a stout resistance, the Indians deserted, the British 
became disheartened, and on the 9th of May made a pre- 
cipitate retreat. 

On the northern frontier, Gen. Dearborn was in command 
at Sackett's Harbor. It was determined to attack York in 
Upper Canada. On the 25th of April, seventeen hundred 
troops were conveyed across the lake by Commodore Chaun- 
cey's fleet. On the 27th, Gen. Pike landed, although met 
at the water's edge by a superior force, drove the enemy 
into their fortifications — and, in spite of the enemy's des- 
perate fighting, and the explosion of their magazine, by 
which we suffered great loss in killed and wounded, the 
Americans carried the town and were completely victorious. 
Of the British, one hundred were killed, near three hun- 
dred wounded, and as many taken prisoners. Of the 
Americans, three hundred and twenty were killed and 
wounded, mainly by the terrific explosion. Among the 
mortally wounded was the gallant Gen. Pike. 

Landing their wounded and prisoners at Sackett's Harbor, 
the combined forces went against Fort George at the upper 
end of the lake. 

Fort George was held by Gen. Yincent with a consider- 
able force of regulars, militia, and Indians. In forwarding 
the operations on this frontier, it was determined to take it. 

Accordingly orders were issued on the 25th and 26th of 
May, 1813, to that effect. Gen. Boyd's order was thus: 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 101 

" Brigade Headquarters, ? 

Camp Four-Mile Creek, May 26 , 1813. $ 
" Conformably to the general order of the 25th and 26th instant, 
the First Brigade will embark at 3 o'clock to-morrow morning. 
The several regiments will hold themselves in readiness accord- 
ingly. The boats of the brigade will form in three lines, succeed- 
ing Col. Scott's advance party. The 15th Regiment formed in 
column of battalion, the right in front, will precede ; the 6th and 
16th will successively follow in the same order. Col. McClure's 
volunteers will flank the right of the brigade, and move accord- 
ingly. Four pieces of the light artillery will move in the rear of 
the 15th Regiment, and four in the rear of the 16th Regiment, the 
first four to form on the right of the brigade. The troops will 
land in column, and form immediately in order of battle, Col. Mil- 
ler, of the 6th, on the right, Major King, of the 15th, in the centre, 
and Col. Pierce, of the 16th, on the left. Col. McClure's volun- 
teers on the right flank of the brigade. 

JOHN P. BOYD, 
Brig. General, Commanding 1st Brigade." 

On the morning of the 27th, the attack was made and 
the Fort taken. 

Gen. Miller on the next day thus wrote of the affair : 

" Fort George, May 28, 1813. 
"Yesterday morning at daybreak, we embarked from our shore 
to attack this place. I commanding the 6th Regiment, it belonged 
to me to command the right wing of the First Brigade ; of course 
it fell to my lot to support the front guard in landing, to land im- 
mediately after them, and support the landing with them, against 
all the enemy's force until the others had landed to assist us. 
When we had arrived within thirty rods of the shore, crowded 
thirty-four in a boat, the enemy commenced an astonishing torrent 
of shot upon us. As we were in no situation to return the fire, 
we were obliged to force the shore in the face of their fire, and by 
the protection of God, we gained the shore and put the enemy to 
flight in a short time afterward ; our loss in killed and wounded 
not one-fourth part so much as the British. Our loss in killed, in 
the whole, was but seventeen. My regiment, consisting of three 
hundred, had seven killed and thirteen wounded. The number of 
wounded of the others was small. We have completely succeeded 
in taking Fort George ; the American standard is now planted in 
it. We killed seventy-five of the enemy, wounded one hundred 
and sixty, and took one hundred and twenty prisoners, and an 
immense quantity of public stores. The battle continued about 
three hours. All is in good trim for conquest here." 



102 adjutant-general's report. 

After this severe contest, the British abandoned the 
fort and retreated. Generals Winder and Chandler 
followed in pursuit, and on the evening of June oth, 
encamped at Stony Creek, near the enemy, who fell upon 
them in the night. It was so dark that the officers could 
not tell their own troops. Both Winchester and Chandler 
got into the midst of the British troops by mistake, and the 
enemy, satisfied with the capture of the two generals and a 
few other prisoners, made good their retreat. The Ameri- 
can troops returned to Fort George. 

Another disaster soon followed. A body of the enemy 
had taken a position at Beaver Dams. Lieut. Colonel 
Boerstler was sent with five hundred men to dislodge them. 
He was surrounded, and his whole detachment taken pris- 
oners. 

On the 27th of May, the British squadron appeared before 
Sackett's Harbor. Gen. Brown of the militia was in com- 
mand, and about one thousand, mainly raw troops, were 
collected for the defense of the town. On the 29th the Brit- 
ish force landed one thousand strong of regulars. Gen. 
Brown had thrown up slight breastworks. Upon the en- 
emy's advance upon this, the militia fled, and the regular 
troops were forced to retire, but they took to the houses on 
the road and from them kept up a galling fire, until the 
British troops halted, fell back, and then hastily retreated 
on board their vessels, leaving behind their wounded. 

Meantime a British squadron was upon the Atlantic coast, 
spreading alarm and making their predatory attacks. Lew- 
iston, in Delaware, was bombarded, and the inhabitants 
along the Chesapeake Bay suffered from the brutal warfare 
of Admiral Cockburne. Frenchtown, Havre-de-Grace, Fred- 
ericktown and Georgetown were destroyed, and Hampton 
was given to pillage, and its inhabitants to brutal outrages 
in revenge for the spirited defense of its small garrison. 

On the first of August, 1813, a large force of British and 
Indians invested Fort Stephenson, on the river Sandusky. 
The garrison numbered one hundred and sixty men under 
Maj. Croghan, who had seen but twenty-one years. This 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 103 

little force, in a fort only of pickets and a ditch, effectually 
resisted the assaults of the enemy, consisting of five hun- 
dred British and eight hundred Indians. After two days of 
cannonading, they attempted to carry the fort by assault, 
but were repulsed with great slaughter. Their commander 
being killed, and many of his men either killed or wounded, 
the enemy made a hasty retreat to Maiden. 

On Lake Erie, the gallant Perry with a fleet mounting 
fifty-four guns, on the 10th of September, met the British 
fleet under the command of Capt. Barclay, mounting sixty- 
three guns, and in a splendid victory after a hard fought 
battle, gave to our country that laconic example of epistolary 
writing, " We have met the enemy and they are ours." 

Upon news of this victory, Gen. Harrison hastened to 
attack Maiden, but the infamous Proctor had anticipated 
the movement, abandoned that post and retreated up the 
river. Harrison leaving a small force at Maiden, made hot 
pursuit of the British army, which passing Detroit, had 
gone up the river Thames as far as the Moravian villages 
in Canada West, where Harrison overtook them in strong 
position, and after a short but severe conflict, killed or cap- 
tured almost the entire British force. In this battle, the 
noted Indian warrior, Tecumseh, was killed in a hand-to- 
hand encounter with Col. Richard M. Johnson, of the Ken- 
tucky mounted riflemen. 

By this decisive victory, Detroit and all the posts surren- 
dered by Gen. Hull were regained by the Americans. Col. 
Lewis Cass* was left in command of the post at Detroit, 



* Lewis Cass was a son of Captain Jonathan Cass, of Exefer, and was born in Exeter, 
October 9, 1782. He obtained a substantial education at Phillip's Academy in his na- 
tive town, read law, and at an early age removed to Ohio. In 1806 he was a member of 
the Ohio Legislature. In 1807 he was appointed Marshal of the State of Ohio by Presi- 
dent Jefferson. In 1812 he was elected colonel of a regiment raised in Ohio, and which 
was attached to General Hull's army at Detroit. Before General Hull crossed the De- 
troit river with his army, Colonel Cass, with his regiment, and Lieut. Colonel Miller, 
with a detachment of the 4th U. S. Infantry, crossed that river, and first raised the Am- 
erican flag upon British soil. Shortly after they were recalled by Gen. Hull and recrossed 
to the American shore unmolested. He and his regiment were surrendered to the British 
soon after, against the decided remonstrances of Colonel Cass and his friend Lieut.- 
Colonel Miller, who ever contended that Detroit and its defenses might have been held 
against any force General Brock could have brought against them. March 12, 1813, 
Colonel Cass was appointed a Brigadier-General, and was in command of the post at 



104 adjutant-general's report. 

and Gen. Harrison with a part of the regular troops retired 
to Buffalo. 

In the fall of 1813, Gen. Wilkinson at the head of the 
"Army of the Centre" was ordered to descend the St. Law- 
rence and attack Montreal. The army numbered seven 
thousand men, but was so dilatory in its movements that 
the flotilla to transport them did not move until the 5th of 
November. They were opposed at every convenient point 
by parties of the enemy, and Gen. Brown with a large force 
was landed, to march down the bank ahead of the flotilla, 
to clear the passage. At a point upon " the long rapids" 
about thirty miles below Ogdensburg, at a place then and 
now known as " Chrystler's Field," on the 11th of Novem- 
ber, Gen. Brown met in position, a British force equal to 
his own. An action followed, fought with great spirit and 
bravery, but indecisive, as both claimed the victory. The 
Americans lost three hundred and forty men in killed and 
wounded ; but they drove the enemy from his position and 
the flotilla passed down unmolested. In this action, Gen. 
Timothy Upham of New-Hampshire distinguished himself 
as a brave officer. He had joined General Wilkinson at 
Sackett's Harbor with a battalion of five hundred picked 
men from his regiment. He was assigned the command of 
one division of the boats in passing down the St. Lawrence, 
" and lost some of his men from the severe cannonade 
poured upon them while passing the enemy's batteries at 
Fort Prescott." At Cornwall below " the rapids," the en- 
emy showed themselves in rear and front. The troops de- 
barked and at "Chrystler's Field," the enemy commenced 



Detroit. In October, 1813, he was appointed Governor of Michigan Territory by Presi- 
dent Madison. In 1829 General Jackson called him to his cabinet as Secretary of War, 
which position he held until he was appointed by hini as Minister to France, in 1836. 
This position he held with much credit until 1843, when he resigned. In January 1815, 
he was elected to the U. S. Senate from Michigan. In May 1848, he was nominated for 
the presidency, and resigned his seat in the Senate. He was re-elected to the Senate 
in January, 1851. March 5, 1857, he was appointed Secretary of State by President 
Buchanan. This office he resigned the first of January, 1861, and retired to private 
life. He died at Detroit June 15, 1S66, in the 74th year of his age. 

General Cass was a brave soldier, an accomplished gentlemen, a true patriot and an 
able statesman, — a son of New -Hampshire, who has reflected much credit upon his 
native State. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 105 

a severe fire upon our troops. Their ammunition had not 
been landed, and Col. Upham was ordered with his battalion 
to hold the enemy in check, until the ammunition should 
come up. This he did with the greatest gallantry for an 
hour, amid a perfect storm of shot. 

Wilkinson's army arrived the next day at St. Regis, where 
Gen. Hampton from Plattsburg had been ordered to meet 
him with the troops under his command, but where, to his 
great disappointment and dismay, he learned that Hampton 
had decided not to join him, and the campaign was aban- 
doned. 

At the South, our war with the Seminoles and Creeks, 
stirred up by the eloquence of Tecumseh, though fierce and 
bloody, was completely successful, as the victories of Tallus- 
hatchie, Talladega and Tohopeka won by Jackson anl his 
gallant Tennessee militia abundantly testify. 

Again on the water, our misfortunes by land, were relieved 
by the noble bearing of our gallant navy, and the names of 
Lawrence, Burrows, Perry, Rogers, and Porter were placed 
high on the list of naval heroes. 

British ships of war remained off the coast of the United 
States during the winter of 1813 and 1814, their rendez- 
vous being at the Bermuda Islands, and Gardner's Bay, at 
the east end of Long Island ; while the coast of eastern New 
England was reached by an easy run of their cruisers from 
Halifax, their naval depot upon the coast of North America. 
During the winter there had been little fear of an attack 
upon the sea-port towns, and in some instances the regular 
troops had been withdrawn from the fortifications. 

Early in March, 1814, Commodore Hull, who commanded 
at the navy yard near Portsmouth, addressed a letter to 
Governor Gilman, calling his attention to the defenseless 
state of the harbor at Portsmouth ; and suggesting that an 
attack might soon be expected, as the British commander of 
the naval force in the neighborhood of Portsmouth would 
not be inactive while our army was about to enter Canada. 

On the 8th of April a party of two hundred British in six 
boats quietly entered the Connecticut, ascended the river 



106 

several miles, and destroyed some twenty vessels collected 
in the river for safety, before any adequate force could be 
raised to oppose them. This attack created the greatest 
alarm along the New-England coast, and on the 11th of April, 
Commodore Hull addressed a second letter to Governor 
Gilman stating that " from information he had received, 
he had no doubt but Portsmouth would be attacked, and 
that the destruction of the Seventy-four and other vessels 
would be their object ; and that neither the fortifications nor 
the force stationed in Portsmouth were, in his opinion, an 
adequate defense." At the same time Major-General 
Storer addressed an urgent letter to the Governor, stating 
that " alarming apprehensions were entertained for the 
safety of Portsmouth, and suggesting the expediency of re- 
organizing the military guard or watch, for the defense of 
Little Harbor." 

On these representations, Governor Gilman on the loth 
of April ordered General Storer to make a detachment of 
not over one hundred men, from the 1st and 35th regiments 
of his Division, to be stationed at Fort Washington and 
Little Harbor. The order was obeyed forthwith, and the 
sa?ne day, two companies were detached and one entered 
upon duty. The company detached from the 1st regiment 
was from Portsmouth and commanded by Capt. Samuel 
Shackford. It was stationed at Fort Washington, and was 
discharged July 17, 1814. Its roll was as follows : 



military history of new-hampshire. 10t 

Roll of Capt. Samuel Shackford's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


I 
Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Samuel Shackford, Captain, 


Apr. 15, 1814 


July 17.1814 




John Chapman, Jr. 1st Lt. 


18 


" 


Suspend'd from service from 


Jonas T. Keys, Sergeant, 


15 


" 


May 1st, to June 6th, in- 


John Lang, " 


" 


" 


clusive. Pay and rations 


Jeremiah Dennett, Corp. 


" 


" 


stopped. 


George Nutter, ' " 


19 


a 




Joel Lyon, " 


22 


a 




George Lang, Musician, 


15 


" 




Kalph Blake, " 


May 6 


<« 




PRIVATES. 








Charles Abbot, 


Apr. 26 


July 17,1814 




Ben.j. Beck, 


15 






Wiliiam Batcheldor, 


May 17 






Benj. Clement, 


Apr. 15 






Alexander Cotton, 


" 






Hyram Coffin, 


" 






Edmund Deering, 


Apr. 30 






Joseph Day, 


19 






Samuel Greenough, 


15 






John Howard, 


15 






Hall Jackson, 


22 






James K. Lang, 


19 






Eben'r Lovett, 


26 






John Lane, 


30 






Silas Mason, jr. 


15 






Ezekiel Pattee, 


May 6 






Thomas Pickering, 


Apr. 30 




Deserted June 5th, 1814. 


William Parsons, 


June 7 


July 17 




Benj. Kendall, 


May 6 






Isaac Small, 


Apr. 15 






George Souther, 


30 






William D. Turner, 


15 






William A. Thompson, 


22 






Joseph Thompson, 


15 


June 12 




Jeptha Tripp, 


May 6 




Deserted June 12th, 1814. 


Samuel Tamlin, 


25 


July 17 




Nath. Todd, 


Apr. 22 


" 




David Wyer, 


30 


a 




Nath. Wescott, 


May 22 




Deserted June 21st, 1814. 


John Ware, 


Apr. 30 


July 17 





The company detached from the 35th Regiment was com- 
manded by Capt. William Marshall, commenced service the 
16th of April, and was discharged July 24th, 1814. • A 
part of this company was stationed at Fort Constitution, 
and a part at Little Harbor. Its roll was as follows : 



108 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. William Marshall's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


William Marshall, Captain, 


April 16, 1814 


July 24, 1814 




Thomas Beal, Lieutenant, 








Robert Sandborn, Sergeant, 


" 


July 17 




Edward Shannen, " 


" 






James Mullen, 








Joseph S. White, " 


" 






Jonathan Tarlton, Corp. 


" 






John Amazeen, 








Abraham Trefet :en, " 








Joseph Berdeen, " 


" 


" 




Samuel Foss, Musician, 


June 12 






PRIVATES. 








Joseph Amazeen, 


April 16 


July 17 




Samuel Ainee, 


22 


24 




Daniel Billings, 


Mav 2 


" 




Natl). Berry, 


April 18 


" 




Joseph W. Bickford, 


16 


" 




Arthur Bran scorn, 


16 


" 




Thomas Curtis, 1st, 


June 2 


" 




Thomas Curtis, 2d, 


April 16 


" 




William Curtis, 


16 


" 




James Dow, 


18 


" 




Carbin Davis, 


16 


a 




Solomon Foss, 


18 


" 




Henry Frost, 


16 


a 




Francis Harvey, 


16 


" 




Benj. Holbrook, 


22 


" 




Edward Hall, 


18 


tt 




Daniel Kinney, 


21 


« 




Simon Knowles, 


18 


" 




Win. Melune, 


16 


it 




Edward Martin, 


16 


" 




Benj. Oliver, 


16 


a 




Sam. Odiorme, 


16 


" 




George T. Patch, 


24 


ft 




James Randall, 


16 


" 




Reuben Randall, 


18 


tt 




John R. Rand, 


16 


a 




Benj. Tarlton, 


16 


u 




Elias Tarlton, 


16 


" 




John Trefethen, 


May 16 


" 




Henrv Tref'e hen, 


April 18 


« 




William Tu kef, 


18 


" 




Nathaniel F ederick, 


16 


" 




Edward Ver ill, 


18 


" 




Joseph White, 


16 


" 




Nathan White, 


June 6 


" 




Thomas Kidder, 


May 25 


<« 




John Witham, 


April 21 


n 




Edward Yeaton, 


16 


" 




Eben Yeaton, 


16 


" 




Nathaniel Yeaton, 


16 


a 




John C. Yeaton, 


21 


" 




Richard Yeaton, 


16 


" 




John Yeaton, 


16 


" 




Samuel Duncan, 


16 


May 22 




Levi Dearborn, 


16 


15 




Samuel Staples, 


19 




Absent without leave. Ji 


Edward Jones, 


16 


April 29 


13, 1814. 


Michael Locke, 


16 


May 19 




John Melum, 


Mav 9 


19 




John H. Yeaton. 


April 16 


July 24 




John Downs, 


June 20 


24 




Eben Fernald, 


April 16 


June 16 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 109 

Both of these companies were raised for three months. 

On the 23d of April, Admiral Cochburne, issued, from his 
rendezvous at the Bahamas, a proclamation declaring the 
whole coast of the United States in a state of blockade, 
thus including New England, before excepted, and forth- 
with British cruisers appeared in the Massachusetts Bay 
and captured and burned some thirty or forty coasting ves- 
sels. This produced the greatest alarm. In Portsmouth 
a town meeting was held and a committee raised " to call 
on the Governor for aid, and giving it as their opinion that 
eight hundred men, in addition to the force then already 
ordered, should be detached for the defense of the town and 
harbor." 

On the 11th of May, Commodore Hull addressed another 
letter to Governor Gilman, stating that he had received 
such information as he relied on, that an immediate attack 
on Portsmouth was intended by the enemy, and that one 
thousand militia more were in his opinion, necessary for the 
defense of the harbor, in consequence of its defenseless state, 
and that if militia ever were wanting for the defense of any 
place, they were then wanting for the defense of Portsmouth. 
This letter was inclosed in one of the same date by Maj. 
Gen. Storer, and addressed to Governor Gilman then in 
session with the Council at Concord, in which he gave it 
as his opinion " that one thousand men ought immediately 
to be detached for the defense of Portsmouth." 

Upon the receipt of these letters, the Council adjourned, 
and the Governor immediately returned to Exeter to take 
measures for the expected attack. On the 14th he ad- 
dressed a note to General Thomas H. Cushing, stating the 
fears of an attack upon Portsmouth, and asking that the 
U. S. troops at Concord might be ordered for the defense 
of Portsmouth, or some other arrangements might be made 
for that purpose. 

Gen. Cushing replied that two companies of the 40th Reg- 
iment had been ordered from Boston J one for Portland and 
the other for Wiscasset, Me., and that the latter might be 
halted at Portsmouth, if an attack was made upon that town. 



110 

On the 20th of May, the Governor issued general order 
for raising six companies from the First Division of the m: 
litia, and two companies from the Second Division, eacl 
company to consist of sixty-four men, exclusive of officers, b; 
detachment if necessary, to be marched within five day 
for Portsmouth. 

The same day he wrote the Secretary of War informinj 
him of the alarm at Portsmouth, the measures pursued fo 
its defense ; that he had ordered out eight companies of tin 
militia, for sixty days unless sooner discharged, at the -urgen 
request of Commodore Hull and the people of Portsmouth 
that the forts in that harbor were very deficient in the num 
ber of men, and suggested an immediate re-inforcement o 
United States troops. 

On the 23d of May, the Governor ordered General Store: 
to prepare comfortable quarters for the detached militia 
and authorized him " to permit the troops thus detached, t< 
march by their voluntary consent, and not otherwise, to am 
points of defense without the limits of the jurisdiction of thi 
State, which might be judged most advisable" 

This permission and condition were introduced into th< 
order as' a salvo to the feelings of the extremists of the op 
position, and at the same time to secure the more effectua 
defense of the harbor and town of Portsmouth, by station 
ing a detachment of our State troops at Fort McClary oi 
the eastern bank of the Piscataqua, then in the Common 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

The detachment thus ordered comprised eight companie 
and was placed under the command of Edward J. Long 
Esq., of Portsmouth, Brigade Inspector of the 1st Brigade 
and also one of the Governor's Staff. 

Major Long took command of the detachment May 27 
1814, and continued in command until the disbanding of th< 
battalion July 26, 1814. The detachment was stationec 
mainly at Fort Washington, but portions of it were at Fort! 
Sullivan and Constitution. 



military history of new-hampshire. ill 

Field and Staff Officers of Long's Regiment of De- 
tached Militia. 
*Edward J. Long, Major. 
Samuel Aiken, Assistant Adjutant. 
Amos Blanchard, Assistant Quartermaster. 
'Jonathan H. Shaw, Assistant Surgeon's Mate. 
Oliver Brooks, Assistant Quartermaster Sergeant. 

* Edward J. Long was of Portsmouth, and was born in 1771. For a time he was a 
merchant of that place. For many years he was Secretary of the Fire and Marine In- 
rance Company of Portsmouth. He was fond of military display, and took an active 
part in the military matters of that section of the State. He commanded the Ports- 
mouth Artillery at an early period, and was appointed Inspector of the 1st Brigade N. 
H. Militia, in 1808, by Gen. Clement Storer, and continued to hold that position until 
1813. In 1814 he was appointed an aid to Governor Gilman. and in September of that 
year, he was appointed Major of the artillery detached for the defense of Piscataqua 
Harbor, and was stationed at Fort Washington. October 5, 1814, he was appointed 
Major of the 2d Battalion of the 1st Regiment N. H. Militia; Lieutenant-Colonel, July 
4, 1816, and Colonel Nov. 5, 1819. June 20, 1820, he was appointed Brigadier-General 
of the 1st Brigade, and continued in this office until his death, which took place a 
Portsmouth, February 27, 1824, at the age of 63 years. His death was caused by a 
fall upon the ice. 



112 



adjutant-general s report. 
Roll of Capt. Allen Goss's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Remarks. 


Allen Goss, Capt. 


May 25, 1814 


July 16, 1814 




Samuel Emmerson, Lieut. 


' 




" 




Edmund Adams, Ensign, 


" 




<< 




Asa Pettengill, Sergeant, 


1 




" 


Sub. to David McCleary. 


William Abbott, " 


' 




" 




Isaac Wheeler, " 


1 




" 




John Leach, " 


' 




" 


Sub. to Jonathan McCollon 


John B. Highlands, Corp. 


t 




" 




William Warner, " 


1 




" 




Eliphalet Butler, " 


< 




" 


Sub. to Enoch Webster. 


Horris Grovesnor, " 


< 




" 




Jabez Mentor. Musician, 


' 




a 




Jacob Marshall, " 


" 


a 




PRIVATES. 








Benjamin Adams, 


May 25, 1814 


July 16, 1814 




John B. Berbank, 


" 


" 


Sub. to William Thompsoi 


David Ben net, 


" 


" 




Benjamin Blanchard, 


a 


a 




Jacob Butler, 


" 


" 


Substitute to Elijah Fox. 


Tappin Bond, 


<( 


" 


Substitute to Moses Carltoi 


Daniel Corlis, 


" 


it 




Mathew Clark, 


a 


* ft 




Isaac Crowell, 


it 


11 




Benjamin Coburn, 


a 


" 


Sub. to Kimball Gilson. 


Benjamin Chase, 


a 


" 




Alexander Colby, 


it 


" 




Elijah Corlis, 


tt 


" 




Joseph Corlis, 


" 


" 


Sub. to Ebenezer Tippet. 


Amos Davis, 


" 


u 


Sub. to William B. Lyon. 


Hazen Davis, 


" 


" 




Robert P. Densmore, 


" 


a 




Samuel Densmore, 


<< 


a 


Sub. to Ira Densmore. 


Jonathan Emmerson, 


ti 


" 


Sub. to William Tenney. 


William Gregg, 


11 


" 




Cyrus Griffin, 


a 


" 




Robert Jeffers, 


a 


" 




Leonard Greely, 


" 


a 


Sub. to Benjamin Boys. 


James Hastings, 


" 


« 




Jonathan Kelsey, 


a 


» 


Sub. to Leonard Kimball. 


Tl azen Little, 


" 


<' 




S imuel Marshall, 


" 


« 


Sub. to Jeremiah Kimball 


Daniel McKeen, 


a 


" 




John Moor, 


" 


" 




Francis Mentor, 


(' 


a 




Thomas Merrill, 


« 


it 


Sub. to Robert Bradford. 


Asa Petfee, 


«< 


" 


Sub. to L. Tippet. 


Thomas Pettee, 


» 


tt 


Sub. to Sol. Farnsworth. 


James Platts, 


<« 


•< 


Sub. to George Alexander 


John Plummer, 


» 


" 


Sub. to Samuel Farbox. 


John PettingiU,' 


" 


• ' 




Jacob Silver, 


" 


" 


Sub. to Tristram Berrier. 


David Paul. 


" 


a 




Ebenezer Wilson, 


" 


tt 




Phillip R. Wiles, 


a 


" 




John Wilson, 


a 


tt 


Sub. to John Flayber. 


Thadeus Hemingway, 


a 


" 




Enos Hardy, 


" 


July 8, 1814 ! Sub. to Joseph Ames. 


Joseph Mitchell, 


ft 


15 Sub. to Asa Poor. 


Robert Billings, 


June 9 


15 


Sub. to Reuben Heath. 


Samuel Perry, 


15 


15 


Sub. to James O'McKeen. 


Thomas Patten, 


May 25 16 


Sub. to David Choate. 













military history of new-hampshire. 113 

Eoll of Capt. George Evans's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. To what time 



Remarks. 



George Evans, Captain, 
Samuel Aiken, jr., Lieut. 
Noah Weeks, Ensign, 
"William Stanwood, Sergt. 
Jonathan Morrill, " 
Samuel W. Evans, " 
Reuben Bean, " 

True C. Graves, Corporal, 
John Dinsmore, " 
Moses Dudley, " 

James Wilcomb, " 
Moses Crichet, Musician, 
Moses Chase, " 



PRIVATES. 

Josiah Anderson, 
Andrew Buntin, 
John Brown, 3d, 
David Brown, 3d, 
Jona S. Brown, 
Ebenezer Brown, 
Jonathan Ball, 
Joseph Calfe, 
Zacbeus Colby, 
Jonathan Cass, 
Jeremiah Chandler, 
Samuel Clark, 
Joseph Cressy, 
James Dinsmoor, 
Beu.j. Edgerly, 
Sathan French, 
David Glidden, 
William Greenough, 
Phineas Haley, 
Henry Hall, 
John Johnson, 
Amos Kimball, 
John Lane, 
rhomas Leonard, 
John Mars, 
Charles Marston, 
Moses C. Magoon, 
Hichard Morse, 
•Supply Morse, 
Math. Martin, 
rhomas Montgomery, 
Peter Niel, 
Nathan Poor, 
Jacob Randall, 
itichard Robie, 
Wadley Richardson, 
John P. Knowell, 
3rlando Spoiford, 
John Seavey, 
Richard Straw, 
Jona. H. Shaw, 
Henry Tbatcher, 
Elisha Tovvle, 
Samuel Thompson, 
Daniel Tovvle, 
Enoch Worthen, 
John Wilson, 3d, 
Stephen Worthen, Jr. 
Vbram Smith, 
Sdmund Richardson, 



May 24, 1814 



May 24, 1814 
25 
24 
24 
26 
26 
24 



26 
24 
30 
June 24 
24 
29 
24 



31 
June 7 
May 31 

24 



June 7 
May 24 

June 7 
May 24 



July 4, 1814 



July 4, 1814 



Reduced to ranks, June 11, 

1814. 
Advanced to Sergt., June 

11, 1814. 



June 23 
July 4 



June 30 
July 4 



Advanced to Corporal June 
11, 1814, which makes 77 
cents more than $14. 



114 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Vincent Meserve's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Remarks. 


Vincent Meserve, Captain, 


May 25,1814 


July 


2,1814 




Beivj. B. Garland, Lieut. 


" 




3 




Ben,j. Waterliouse, Ensign, 


" 




3 




Wintlirop Smith, Sergeant, 


" 




2 




Eben Joy, " 


" 




" 




Joseph Chesley, '• 


" 




" 




Richard H. Foss, " 


" 




« 




Reuben Willey, Corporal, 


" 




« 




Isaac Foss, " 


" 




3 




John Plaice, " 


" 




3 




Samuel Trickey, " 


" 




2 




John A. Rollins, P. Music'n. 


a 




3 




Hale Watson, " 


" 




2 


Promoted from private Jm 


Isaac Furber, " 


" 






12, 1812. 


PRIVATES. 










Jeremiah Eliot. 


May 25,1814 


July 


2, 1814 




Ivory Hayes, 


June 4 




" 




Daniel Taylor, 


May 25 




" 




David Clough, 






" 




Francis Butler, 






" 




David Hull, 






" 




Robt. Willey, 






" 




Asa Durgin, 






" 




Supply Johnson, 






" 




David Rand, 






" 




Robert Carter, 






" 




Stephen Davis, 






a 




Israel Drew, 






" 




Wintlirop Badger, 






« 




William Pinkham, 






(< 




Thomas James, 






« 




David Williams, 






tt 




Stevens Durgin, 






(i 




Asa Watson, 






" 




James Sawyer, 






" 




Simeon Rand, 




July 


3 




Caleb Buzzel, 






" 




Samson Babb, 






" 




Benj. Church, 






" 




George Gray, 






" 




Ahimahas Watson, 






a 




Isaac Kemick, 






a 




Edward Wood, 






a 




Nick Nute, 






tt 




Jonathan Johnson, 






n 




Reuben Grey, 






it 




Edmond Jones, 






" 




Joseph Jones, 






" 




John Welch, 






" 




Reuben Critchet, 






it 




Jonathan Hall, 






" 




Samuel Grey, 






tt 




James Berry, 






a 




Stephen Otis, 






a 




Joseph Davis, 






it 




John Lougee, 






tt 




Ralph Brock, 






" 




Eliot G. Burnham, 






tt 


Sub. for Stephen Willey. 


Geo. Hill, 


June 7 




it 


Sub. for Silas Falcar. 


Israel Daniels, 


May 25 


June 


3 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 115 

Roll of Capt. Jacob Dearborn's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


To what time. 


Remarks. 


Jacob Dearborn, Captain, 


May 25,1814 


July 6, 1814 




Samuel Dow, Lieut. 


" 


" 




Joseph Akerman, Ensign, 


" 


tt 




Shubal Leavitt, Sergeant, 


a 


June 22 


Deserted June 14, 1814. 


Christ'r Eaton, " 


24 


July 7 




Edmund Pillsbury, " 


24 


" 




Jona. Marston, 3d, " 


25 


6 




Thomas Fowler, Corporal, 


" 


" 


Appointed Sergt., June 23, 


Benj. Prescott, " 


24 


7 


1814. 


Enoch Bartlett, " 


it 


tt 




John Marshall, Private, 


" 


6 


App'ted Corp. June 23, 1814. 


Benj. Page, " 


" 


" 


Appointed Corporal, June 


Amos Boyd, Musician, 


<« 


a 


23, 1814. 


Jere T. Marston, " 


'• 


" 




PRIVATES. 








Jonas Akerman, 


May 24, 1814 


July 6, 1814 




Benj. Akerman, 


" 


" 




James Blake, 


" 


" 




Levi Blake, 


" 


" 




E. M. Blaisdell, 


" 


a 




Wm. Bragg, 


a 


" 




S. D. Brown, 


a 


" 




Gideon Bartlett, 


" 


7 




Pearley Bartlett, 


25 


6 




Moses Brown, 


24 


7 




Caleb Brown, 


24 






B. Brown, 


24 


tt 




Samuel Cutts, 


25 


6 




E. F. Colley, 


24 


7 




B. Currier, 


" 


a 




Moses Davis, 


25 


6 




Isaiah Dow, 


" 






Aaron Dow, 


a 


« 




Surplus Davis, 


24 


7 




Ben,]. Dow, 


25 


6 




G Day, 


<< 


7 




Daniel Eaton, jr. 


•24 


tt 




Andrew Eaton, 


25 


6 




Jacob Eaton, 


" 






D. Fowler, 


'< 


a 




Abner Fowler, 


tt 


a 




Saul Harden, 


a 


a 




J. Haines, 


a 


7 




J. James, 


24 


6 




Jona. Knowles. 


25 






Daniel Lamphrey, 


24 


n 




John Lamphrey, 


25 


a 




Jona. H. Lock, 


25 


7 




David Lock, 


24 


6 




Jacob Marston, jr. 




a 




John Moulton, jr. 


tt 


n 




Abraham Marston 3d, 


n 


it 




Reuben McCrillis, 


a 


t. 




Josiah Mudd, 


(i 


tt 




James Perkins, 


tt 


7 




Benj. Perkins, 


tt 


6 




Moses Perkins, 


tt 


a 




"Wm. Palmer, 


24 


a 




Zachariah Roberts, 


25 


tt 




James Boyden, 




it 




Willard Shaw, 


tt 


tt 




Wm. Thompson, 


tt 


it 




Robert Tilton, 


tt 


it 




Mark Webster, 


tt 


it 




Wm. Godfrey, 


« 


tt 




Thos. Foss, 


it 


tt 




John Clifford, 


24 


1 





116 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Andrew Pierce's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Remarks. 


♦Andrew Pierce, Captain, 


May 25, 1814 


July 2, 1814 




John Nutter, Lieut. 


24 


3 




Joseph Hussey, Ensign, 


25 


2 




Richard Waldron, Sergt. 


" 


3 




Tobias Garvin, " 


a 


" 




Pelatiah Hanscom, " 


24 


3 




Philip Hubbard, " 


25 


2 




Joshua Jones, Corporal, 


24 


3 




Eben'r Plumnier, " 


" 


" 




Simeon French, " 


" 


" 




Henry Whitehouse," 


25 


2 




Phineas Hoit, Musician, 


June 7 


3 




PRIVATES. 








Daniel Abbott, 


May 25, 1814 


July 2 




Isaac Bickt'ord, 


24 


3 




John Bickford, 


25 


2 




Samuel Bradley, 


24 


3 




Tobias Cole, 


25 


2 




James Chesley, 


" 


" . 




Wm. Cook, 


24 


3 




Eben'r Cook, 


" 


" 




Jonathan Caswell, 


" 


" 




Isaac Canney, 


" 


" 




Peter dishing, 


25 


2 




Joseph Gage, 
Jeremiah Goodwin, 


" 


" 




24 


3 




Ephraim Hall, 


a 


2 




Joseph Haynes, 


25 


3 




Isaac Hobbs, 


24 


June 10 




Jeremiah Hill, 


June 10 


Julv 2 




Ephraim Ham, 


May 24 


June 18 




Joseph Hussey, 


" 


June 10 




Samuel Judkins, 


25 


July 2 




Nath. Jenness, 


" 


" 




Nehemiah Kimball, 


24 


June 10 




John Kimball, 


June 10 


July 3 




Levi W. Leighton, 


May 24 


June 7 




Benj. Leathers, 


25 


Julv 2 




Richard Leighton, 


24 


3 




Theo. Littlefield, 


25 


2 




James Meder, 


" 


" 





*Capt. Andrew Pierce, Jr., was of Dover, and was born in Gloucester, Mass., Feb 
14, 1792. His early life was passed mostly at sea, but he retired trom that arduoui 
life about 1832, to that of a merchant, and thereafter until his death was extensively 
engaged in trade and shipping. Quiet and retiring in his manners, he was seldom hi' 
duced to accept public office, yet he was of the Board of Selectmen of Dover, was Sen- 
ator from the Senatorial District No. 5, in 1843, and Elector of President and Vice 
President. He was Captain of a company of detached militia in 1814, as above, Majoi 
in the 2d Regiment from 1814 to 1818, when he was appointed Colonel of the same regi- 
ment. This office he resigned June 22, 1819. A writer who knew him well says of th( 
Hon. Andrew Pierce, in an obituary: 

"He had however, been for many years a resident of this town; and has left th( 
impress of his active business habits, and the uncommon energy of his character, en- 
stamped on the social relations and prosperity of the place. Possessed of a quick and 
keenly discerning mind, he was ever wont to pursue whatever he deemed was right 
with a firm and persevering step by which his aims were successfully accomplished 
and his example as a man of promptness, probity, and honor, will be regarded as s 
rich legacy to the community in which he lived, while the poor and the suffering evei 
found in him a ready sympathy and a liberal hand." 

He died at Dover March 29, 1850, in the 59th year of his age. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 117 

Roll of Capt. Pierce's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Remarks. 


Samuel Ware, 


May 24,1814 


July 3, 1814 




Ivory Osnian, 


" 


" 




Taylor Page, 


25 


2 




Ep'hraim Plummer, 


24 


3 




George Pierce, 


June 18 


" 




Luke Collins, 


May 24 


" 




Charles Ricker, 


" 


" 




Aaron Ricker, 


" 


" 




John Roberts, 


" 


" 




Isaac Roberts, 


a 


a 




Thos. Roberts, 


" 


" 




Charles Ricker, jr. 


" 


June 20 




Wm. Smith, 


" 


July 3 




Isaac Stevens, 


a 


" 




Samuel Smallcom, 


25 


2 




Stephen Scrutin, 


24 


June G 




Jonathan Scrutin, 


June 6 


July 3 




Shades Smith, 


June 10 


" 




Jerry Tibbetts, 


May 24 


" 




Samuel Thompson, 


" 


" 




Benj. Tasker, 


June 20 


" 




Elijah Tuttlet, 


May 25 


2 




Joseph Whitehouse, 


24 


3 


. 


Joseph Wentworth, 


25 


2 




Wm. Warren, 


24 


3 




Israel Whitehouse. 


" 


" 





118 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Peter Hearsey's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Peter Hearsey, Captain, 


May 


24, 1814 


July 6, 1814 




Eben'r Smith, Lieutenant, 




" 


" 




Benj. French, Ensign, 




« 


it 




John Kaim, Sergeant, 




" 


it 


Acting Quartermaster. 


True Osgood, " 




" 


a 




Jona. Dearborn, " 




a 


(t 




Peter Drowne, " 




it 


" 




Joseph K. Doe, Corporal, 




" 


« 




David McQuillan, " 




a 


" 




Arthur Bransconib, " 




" 


" 




George Doe, 


June 


6 


" 




John Clark, Fifer, 


May 


24 


" 




Eben'r Pease, " 




" 


it 




"William Pike, Drummer, 




it 


It 




PRIVATES. 










Oliver Brooks, 


May 


24, 1814 


June 6,1814 


Promoted to Quartermas 


John Brown, 




" 


July 6 


ter's Sergeant. 


John Bean, 




<< 


J a 




Daniel Cram, 




" 


it 




Ephraim Downs, 




a 


<■• 




John Edgerly, 




» 


" 




Joseph Filield, 




•' 


<( 




Zebulon Gilman, 


June 


3 


" 




David Goodwin, 


May 


24 


a 




James Glidden, 




" 


a 




John T. Hill, 




a 


a 




James W. Hale, 




" 


a 




Levi Kennison, 




a 


a 




Walter Little, 




a 


a 




Jonathan Leavitt, 




a 


a 




Nath. Lovering, 




" 


" 




Prescott Lawrence, 




a 


a 




Andrew Miles, 




a 


a 




George Marble, 




a 


a 




Thomas Montgomery, 




ti 


a 




Oliver Pinner, 




" 


« 




Stephen Pendergast, 




« 


" 




Theodore Ricker, 




a 


a 




George Russell, 
Josiah Randlett, 




a 


ti 






a 


it 




Enoch Sandborn, 




a 


it 




Nathl. Souther, 




a 


a 




Daniel Smith, 




it 


a 




Daniel Stevens, 




a 


a 




William Tarlton, 




it 


a 




William Trefethen, 




it 


a 




James Thompson, 




a 


it 




Vincent Torr, 




(t 


a 




John Wadley, 




it 


ti 




Samuel Wiggin, 




a 


a 




Winthrop Watson, 




it 


tt 




Jonathan West, 
Noah Davis, 




ti 
it 


May 29 


[born's Co. 
Transferred to Capt. Dear- 


William Greenough, 




ti 




Trans, to Capt. Evan's Co. 



military history of new-hampshire. 119 

Roll of Capt. Bradbury Bartlett's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



* Bradbury Bartlett, Capt. 
John Eastman, Lieutenant, 
Timothy Hill, Ensign, 
Isaac Shepard, Sergeant, 
Isaac Folsome, " 

Jon a. W. Emerson, " 
Gilbert Chad wick, " 
Jonathan Moon, Corporal, 
J. J. Sandborn, " 

Jonathan Goss, " 

Stephen Bartlett, " 
Jonathan Veasey, Musician, 
Jacob Davis, " 

G. F. Blaisdell, " 

PRIVATES. 

Samuel Fogg, 
Hilyard Fogg, 
Edward Woodman, 
Enoch F. Stevens, 
Jacob Bartlett, 
Meshech Weare, 
Edward Richardson, 
Oliver Leathers, 
David Burnham, 
John McDaniel, 
David Clay, 
Henry Nealley, 
Simeon Wait, 
George Hall, 
Benjamin Noyes, 
Ebenezcr Huckins, 
Jonathan Jenness, 
Thomas Martin, 
Squires Batchelder, 
Isaac Staniels, 
Winthrop Plilbrook, 
Joseph Robinson, 
Benjamin Bray, 
Samuel Bickford, 
Thomas Grant, 
John P. Rowell, 
Elijah Moses, 
John Gilbert, 
Andrew Mason, 
Sanborn Prescott, 



May 24, 1814. 



July 6, 1814. 



May 24, 1814. 



July G, 1814. 



*Capt. Bradbury Bartlett of Nottingham was born January 21, 1783. His father was 
Gen. Thomas Bartlett of Nottingham, who was Colonel of a regiment in the Revolu- 
tion. His mother was Sarah Cilley, a daughter of Col. Joseph Cilley of the Revolution, 
Capt. Bradbury Bartlett was married in 1806, to Polly True of Deerfield, by the Rev. 
Timothy Upham of that town, and the father of Colonel Timothy Upham of the war 
of 1812. August 25, 1809, he was appointed Captain of the 1st company of Infantry in 
the 18th Regiment. In 1814, he was appointed Captain of a company of detached mi- 
litia, as seen above. In 1818, 1819 and 1820, he was Lieutenant-Colonel of the 18th 
Regiment, and Colonel of the same for three years, beginning with 1821. In 1824, he 
was appointed Brigadier-General of the 3d Brigade, which office he resigned in 1826. 
He was Senator from District No. 2, in 1831 and 1832, and in the latter year was 
appointed Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for Rockingham County, which office 
he resigned in 1851. Judge Bartlett is a man of great decision and energy, and is 
residing on his farm at Nottingham, enjoying the " green old age" of eighty-live years, 
in good health and spirits, with a mind as clear, and a signature as legible, as a man 
of forty. 



120 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Bartlett's Company — concluded. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



John Griffin, 
Amasa Seavey, 
Nathaniel Edmunds, 
Samuel Seavey, 
Daniel Durgin, 
Edward L. Bennett, 
Levi True, 
John Pillsbury, 
Jacob Eaton, 
Solomon Langley, 
Benjamin Durgin, 
Stephen Emerson, 
Benjamin James, 
Levi York, 
Benjamin York, 
Nathaniel Sanborn, 
Samuel Drake, 



May 24, 1814. 



July 6, 1814 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 121 

Roll of Capt. Phineas Webster's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. To what time 



Remarks. 



Phineas Webster, Captain, 
Daniel Colcord, Lieutenant, 
Daniel P. Eaton, Ensign. 
Caleb S. Cushing, Sergeant, 
John G. Sanborn, " 
James B. Kimball, " 
Samuel Bassett, " 

Richard Randall, Corporal, 
Francis Greenough, " 
Daniel Williams, " 

Bartholomew Heath, " 
John A. Rollins, P Music'n 
Enoch Brown. " 

David Underhill, " 

PRIVATES. 

Amos Judkins, 
Bagley Carter, 
William Taylor, 
William Clark, 
Peter Miller, 
Gilbert Bond, 
John Wood, 
Daniel Osgood, 
Jesse Davis, jr. 
Samuel Spollett, 
Francis Cornell, 
John Simmons, 
Ezra Gibson, 
Elihu Woodman, 
Gideon Walker, 
Amos Eaton, 
David Catleton, 
Moses Hoyt, 
Joshua Wright, 
Hermes Dobbin, 
William Harriman, 
Daniel Wadleigh, 
Thomas Sever, 
Elisha Sever, 
Thomas Silloway, 
John Sweat, 
Samuel Cavaly, 
Nehemiah Sargent. 
William Jackman, 
Sargent Heath, 
Philip W. Bell, 
Gilman Goodrich, 
William Bayley, 
Katli. George, 
Daniel Poor, 
Hanson Brackett, 
Daniel W. Stevens, 
Joseph Stephenson, 
John Knight, 
James McKinzie, 
John Meader. 
Stephen Dust'in, 
Closes Anderson, 
Nathan Gove, 
Benj. Welch, 
Jacob Quimbey, 
Stephen Quimbey, jr. 
Robert York, 
Robert Greenough, 
Samuel Quimbey, 
Jonathan Jennings, 



May 25,1814 



July 
May 



May 25,1814 



May 29 



June 1 



June 



July 16, 1814 



July 1 
16 



July 16,1814 



July 7 
16 



122 

The Legislature assembled Jan. 1, 1814, amid tins ex- 
citement, and the Governor laid before them his doings in 
a special message. A special committee was appointed 
upon the subjects of the detached militia, and the maritime 
defense. This committee had before them the acts of the 
Governor and his correspondence as to the defense of Ports- 
mouth. While having these matters under consideration, 
the Governor received a letter from the Secretary of War 
under date of June 9, 1814, as follows : 

"War Department, June 9, 1814. 
Sir : — Your Excellency's letter of May 20th has been received. 
Gen. Cushing has re-inforced the garrison of artillerists at Ports- 
mouth with two companies of infantry. These, with two hundred 
seamen, under Commodore Hull, and the artillerists, will make a 
good defense against boats, the only mode of attack to be appre- 
hended. 

One company of sea-fencibles are also authorized to be raised 
for the further defense of the sea-coast of New-Hampshire. 
I am, sir, veiy respectfully, 

Your most obedient servant, 

J. ARMSTRONG. 
His Excellency J. T. Gilman. 
Governor of New Hampshire." 

This letter was placed in the hands of the committee by 
the Governor, and at once caused excitement among them. 
They found no fault with the contents of the letter, but 
with its non-contents , and one can hardly conceive at this 
day why it should have produced such results. The letter 
was received on the 17th of June, and on the 24th the spe- 
cial committee made a report upon the " subject of the de- 
tached militia and the maritime defense," in which they 
remark, " In this letter from the Secretary of War, your 
Committee perceive no acknowledgment of the propriety of 
His Excellency's measures of defense ; no intimation of 
his opinion that justice would require the United States to 
indemnify New-Hampshire for the expenses incurred by the 
defensive measures adopted by His Excellency the Gov- 
ernor ; but on the contrary, it is very manifest from this 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 123 

letter of the Secretary of War, that, in his opinion, any 
further measures of defense, upon this part of the State, or 
even the continuance of the services of the detached mili- 
tia, would be useless." 

" Your Committee therefore recommend, that His Excel- 
lency the Governor, be authorized and requested immedi- 
ately to disband six companies of the militia detached May 
20, 1814; and that His Excellency be requested to retain in 
service two companies of said detached militia for the term 
of twenty days from and after this date ; and also to retain 
the company of militia which was detached April 15, 1814, 
to keep watch and guard at Little Harbor, Peirce's Island, 
and such other places as may be found necessary, for the 
protection and defense of the town and harbor of Ports- 
mouth, and the adjacent country, for and during the term 
of thirty days from and after this date ; and that His Ex- 
cellency the Governor be requested to communicate imme- 
diately the substance of this resolution to the Secretary of 
the War Department." The report was accepted, and the 
Governor discharged six of the companies the first week in 
July, whilst the two companies commanded by Capt. Phin- 
eas Webster of the 7th Regiment, and Capt. Allen Goss of 
the 8th Regiment, were not discharged until the 16th of 
July, according to the recommendation of the committee. 
As recommended by them, the company from the 35th Reg- 
iment, commanded by Capt. William Marshall was contin- 
ued in the service, and another company was detached from 
the 2d Brigade, by order of the Governor, commanded by 
Capt. James Hardy. Jmese companies were under the 
command of Major Pierce P. Furber,* Brigade-Inspector of 
the 2d Brigade. They were discharged about the middle 
of November, 1814. The roll of Capt. Marshall's com- 
pany was as follows : 

* Major Pierce P. Furber was the son of General Pachard Furber, of Farmington 
where he was born August 20, 1788. He was a farmer, and resided on the old home- 
stead. He was Brigade-Inspector of the 2d Brigade, commanded by his father at that 
time, with the rank of Major, and as such was appointed to command this detachment 
He resided in Farmington till 1827, when he moved to Dover, Me. He followed the 
business of farmer, surveyor, and land explorer, in Maine, until 1851, when he removed 
to St. Paul, Ma., where he now resides. 



124 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Wm. Marshall's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Wm. Marshall, Captain, 


July 25,1814 


Three months 




Wm. Sliute, Lieut. 


30 






Robert White, 


25 






John Chapman, jr. " 


" 






Benj. French, Ensign, 


a 






Hall J. Locke, Sergeant, 


" 






Edward Shannon, " 


a 




Newcastle. 


Joseph S. White, " 


a 




Newcastle. 


Eben'r Flanders, " 


Aug. 6 




Concord. 


John Lang, jr. " 


Julv 25 




Portsmouth. 


Simon Johnson, Corporal, 


Aug. 8 




Rye. 


Joseph Tarleton, * " 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


Benj. C. Waldron, " 


Aug. 6 




Concord. 


Arthur Brancomb, " 


Julv 25 




New Market. Discharged 


Samuel Foss, Musician, 


Aug. 7 




Rye. [Sept. 27, 1*14. 


Isaac Leering, " 


10 




Kittery, Mass. 


PRIVATES. 








Samuel Ames, 


Aug. 6 


Three months 


Kittery, Mass. 


John Amazeen, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


David B. Abbot, 


Aug. 10 




York, Mass. Discharged 


Samuel Ames, 


6 




Pembroke. [Oct. IS, 1814. 


Arthur Branscomb, jr. 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


Nath. Berry, 


" 




Rye. 


Ralph Blake, 


30 




Portsmouth. 


Tobias Barnes, 


" 




Berwick, Mass. 


James Bunting, 


Aug. 6 




Bow. 


Floyd W. Burnham, 


" 




Gilmanton. 


Wm. Bodge, 


13 




Medbury. 


Wm. Curtis, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


Foxwell Curtis, 


" 




Newcastle. 


Thomas Curtis, 


Aug. 8 




Newcastle. 


Wm. Cottle, 


9 




Elliott, Mass. 


Alex. Cotton, 


July 30 




Portsmouth. 


Joshua S. Clark, 


Aug. 6 




Allenstown. 


Nathan Centers, 


" 




Concord. 


Nath. Colman, 


Oct. 12 




Greenland. 


Samuel Duncan, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


John Downs, 


Aug. 1 




Gosport. 


Edmund Deering, 


4 




Kittery. Mass. 


Wm. Durgin, 


July 25 




New Market. 


Ab'm Downing, 


Aug. 11 




Portsmouth. 


Fred. Elliot, 


6 




Concord. Sick. 


Samuel Evans, 


" 




Allenstown. 


Eben'r Eastman, 


•f 




Pembroke. 


Joseph Emery, 


" 




Pembroke. 


Henry Frost, 


3 




Newcastle. 


Nath.' Foss, 


7 




Rve. 


Solomon Foss, 


8 




Rye. 


Jedediah Fry, 


6 




Concord. 


David Gardner, 


3 




Portsmouth. 


Andrew Gerrish, 


6 


• •- 


Kittery. Mass. 


Moses Gill, 


July 26 




New Market. 


Benj. Holbrook, 


25 




Newcastle. Sick. 


Edward Hall, 


28 




Rye. 


Edmund Holt, 


Aug. 6 




Pembroke. 


Aaron M. Hill, 


9 




Portsmouth. 


Simon Knowles, 


8 




Northampton. 


Samuel Kimball, 


6 




Concord. 


Michael Locke, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


Benj. Lear, 


Aug. 7 




Rve. 


John Locke, 


8 




Rye. 


Jona. Langmaid, 


July 26 




New Market. 


Wm. Melum, 


25 




Newcastle. 


Robert Martin, 


30 




Newcastle. 


John Mace, 


Aug. 7 




Rye. 


Richard Morse, 


6 




Pembroke. 


James Mullin, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


David Morgan, 


Aug. 6 




Bow. 


George Neal, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 125 

Roll of Capt. Wm. Marshall's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Andrew Nutter, 


Aug. 14,1814 


Three months 


Kittery, Mass. 


Geo. B. Odiorne, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


Benj. Oliver, 


25 




Newcastle. 


Elias Perkins, 


Aug. 7 




Rye. 


David Philbric, 


9 




Rye. 


Win. Parsons, 


July 30 




Kittery, Mass. 


John Rogers, 


Aug. 4 




Kittery, Mass. 


Reuben S. Randall, 


7 




Rye. 


Rufus Randall, 


10 




York, Mass. Discharged. 


George Raped, 


July 26 




New Menton. 


Isaiah S. Robinson, 


Aug. 6 




Concord. 


Joseph Rand, 


3 




Rye. 


James Stevens, 


9 




Rye. 


Thomas B. Sargent, 


6 




Concord. 


John Stevens, 


6 




Concord. 


Samuel Sheriff, 


8 




Portsmouth. 


Edward Staples, 


10 




Elliott, Mass. 


Alex. Spinney, 


13 




Elliott, Mass. 


John Trefethen, 


July 35 




Newcastle. 


Wm. Tucker, 


Aug. 7 




Rye. 


Joseph Trefethen, 


8 




Rye. 


Henry Trefethen, 


9 




Rye. 


John Todd, 


10 




Kittery, Mass. 


Charles Tetherly, 


13 




Elliott, Mass. 


Edward Barrell, 


July 25 




Rye. 


John Vennard, 


25. 




Newcastle. 


Joseph Barrell, 


Aug. 7 




Rye. 


Thomas Whidden, 


8 




Portsmouth. 


John Whitney, 


6 




Concord. 


Benj. Welch, 


11 




Elliott, Mass. 


Josiah Weeks, 


22 




Greenland. 


Edward Yeaton, 


July 25 




Newcastle. 


John Yeaton, 


<< 




Newcastle. 


Nath. Yeaton, 


it 




Newcastle. 


John Yeaton, jr. 


tt 




Newcastle. 


Richard Yeaton, 


tt 




Newcastle. 


John C. Yeaton, 


, tt 




Newcastle. 


Eben'r Yeaton, 


tt 




Newcastle. 


Wm. J. Marshall, 


a 






George F. White, 


« 






Paul Chapman, jr. 


" 




Discharged Sept. 18, 1814. 


John Ross, 


July 25 




Discharged Sept. 18, 1814. 


Wm. B. A. Locke, 


Sept. 19 






Jona. Varnum, 


19 






James Dow, 


Aug. 8 




Discharged Aug. 25, 1814. 



126 



adjutant-general s report. 
Roll of Capt. James Hardy's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


James Hardy, Captain, 


Aug. 11,1814 


Three months 


Joined August 11, 1814. 


John Tattle, 1st Lieut. 




tt 




Henry Mallard, 2d " 




a 




Jos. L. Bartlett, 3d " 




a 




Ivory Chamberlain, Ensign, 




a 




John Garland, Sergeant, 




a 


New Durham. 


Bartholomew Gale, " 




it 


Gilman ton. 


Dudley Gilman, " 




tt 


Gilmanton. 


James Hoit, " 




it 


Barnstead. 


Isaac Pinkham, " 




tt 


New Durham. 


Dependence Colbath, Corp. 




tt 


Barnstead. 


Nehemiah Morrison, " 




ti 


Alton. 


John Place, " 




tt 


Barnstead. 


James Roberts, " 




H 


Alton. 


Joseph Lyl'ord, Musician, 




a 


Barnstead. [9, 18P 


Jonathan Jacobs, " 




" 


Barnstead. Deserted No\ 


PRIVATES. 








Nathaniel Abbot, 


Aug. 11, 1814 


Three months 


Wakefield. 


Ebenezer Allen, 


" 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Frederick Ballard, 


" 


a 


Wakefield. 


Gardner Barker, 


tt 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Durrell Bean, 


" 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Asa Crosby, 


" 


ti 


Guilford. 


John Clark, 


<< 


a 


Barnstead. 


James Clark, 


" 


a 


Alton. 


Aaron Clough, 


tt 


a 


Guilford. 


Stephen Chamberlain, 


" 


a 


New Durham. 


Mark Chase, 


" 


a 


Guilford. 


Nehemiah Clough, 


" 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Jacob Chamberlain, 


" 


a 


New Durham. 


Joseph Durgin, 


" 


tt 


Barnstead. 


Jonathan Dow, 


" 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Elihu Dow, 


" 


a 


Gilmanton. 


James Drew, 


" 


a 


Brookfield. 


Jeremiah Davis, 


<< 


a 


Barnstead. 


Surplus Davis, 


" 


ft 


New Durham. 


Jonathan Darling, 


" 


a 


Sanborn ton. 


Ezekiel El kins, 


« 


a 


Guilford. 


Zachariah Eliot, 


a 


a 


Barnstead. 


Andrew Fisher, 


a 


a 


Barnstead. 


Daniel Frowhawk, 


tt 


a 


Guilford. 


Daniel Foster, 


" 


a 


Guilford. [9, 181 


Stephen Gale, 


it 


a 


Gilmanton. Deserted No 


Ebenezer Gale, 


tt 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Levi Goss, 


a 


a 


Guilford. 


James L. Gowdy, 


" 


a 


Wakefield. 


Stephen Grant, 


n 


it 


Wakefield. 


Hazen Gott, 


a 


a 


Gilmanton. 


John Grace, 


" 


a 


New Durham. 


Jacob Hanson, 


it 


tt 


New Durham. 


Jonathan Hill, 


a 


a 


Guilford. 


Francis Haze, 


it 


a 


Alton. 


James Herrick, 


tt 


a 


Sanbornton. 


Ezekiel Jacobs, 


a 


a 


Barnstead. 


Joseph Jacobs, 


a 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Samuel Jacobs, 


" 


a 


Barnstead. 


John Kennison, 


ti 


a 


Middleton. 


Philbric Leavitt, 


it 


a 


Guilford. 


John Leach, 


it 


a 


New Durham. 


Levi Leavitt, 


a 


a 


Guilford. 


Stephen Leavitt, 


a 


tt 


Guilford. 


Francis Lyl'ord, 


a 


a 


Barns; e ad. 


Benjamin Mudgett, 


a 


a 


Gilmanton. 


Josiah Main, 


a 


it 


New Durham. 


James Nutter, 


a 


(I 


Gilmanton. 


Daniel Page, 


a 


H 


Wakefield. 


Hiram Pierce, 


" 


tt 


Wakefield. 


Joseph Page, 


" 


ti 


Wakefield. 


Joseph Pitman, 


" 


" 


Brookfield. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 127 

Roll of Capt. Hardy's Company — concluded. 











Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Jonathan Eandlet, 


Aug. 11,1814 


Three months 


Gilmanton. 


Thomas Rogers, 




" 


Alton. 


Samuel Rogers, 




k 


Alton. 


George Stevens, 




" 


Brook field. 


Joseph Straw, 




" 


Barnstead. 


Ira Seavey, 




" 


Guilford. 


Waldron Sandborne, 




" 


Gilmanton. 


Samuel Small, 




" 


Guilford. 


Joseph Sanborn, 




" 


Guilford. 


Benjamin Tasker, 




" 


Barnstead. 


Elijah Thompson, 




" 


Gilmanton. [Nov. 0, 1814. 


Asa Tuttle, 




" 


Barnstead. Discharged 


Levi Thompson, 




(< 


Gilmanton. 


Jonas Trefethen, 




" 


New Durham. 


John Thurston, 




" 


Gilmanton. 


Win. Trefethen, 




" 


Fort Sullivan. 


Valentine Willey, 




" 


Gilmanton. 


Greenleaf Willey, 




" 


Barnstead. 


Stephen Webster, 




" 


New Durham. 


Jeremiah Willey, 




" 


New Durham. 


Obadiah Witham, 




n 


Wakefield. 


Joseph Willey, 




« 


New Durham. [8. 1814. 


Israel B. Whitehouse, 




" 


Middleton. Deserted Nov. 


Stephen Willey, 




" 


New Durham. 


Joseph Young, 




tt 


Gilmanton. 


Winthrop Young, 




" 


Barnstead. 


Stephen Young, 




" 


Brookfield. 


Xeenans Hoit, 




" 


Barnstead. 


Joseph Davis, 




.< 


Barnstead. 


Daniel Trefethen, Waiter, 




a 




George Frost, " 




" 




Archilus Trefethen, " 

a; . . 




" 





Meantime, while this matter of the Governor's corres- 
pondence was before the committee, the greatest excite- 
ment existed at Portsmouth. They had been for weeks in 
the expectation of an immediate attack upon the town, by 
the British, whose cruisers were continually hovering about 
our coast. Alarms had been frequent as to the landing 
of the British, and many of the inhabitants had their val- 
uables packed ready for transportation into the co'untry for 
safety, in hourly expectation of an attack. At length, on 
the 21st clay of June, 1814, between the hours of ten and 
eleven at night, expresses came riding into the town with 
the alarming intelligence that the British were landing their 
forces at Rye, and were about to inarch upon the town of 
Portsmouth. This attack was from an unexpected quarter, 
and the greatest excitement seized upon the inhabitants. 
" Alarm bells were rung, and signal guns fired. All the 
military companies turned out with alacrity and prepared 



128 adjutant-general's report. 

for the attack." Teams and people on foot, loaded with 
packages and bundles, filled the streets, making with all 
haste for the country. Old men, women and children, filled 
the sidewalks, shrieking, exhorting, crying, and making the 
confusion babel-like, — drums were beating, and the loud 
clash of horses' feet upon the pavement were ever and anon 
heard, as officials rushed through the streets upon their 
pressing duties. " A martial spirit pervaded all ranks, and 
they glowed with ardor to be led to the place of danger." 
Shortly order prevailed to some extent, and scouts/ were 
sent out to discover, if possible, the situation and intentions 
of the enemy. They soon returned with the welcome in- 
telligence that the report was unfounded. The guard at 
Rye had discovered off their harbor, some suspicious boats 
passing to and fro, and hence the false alarm. 

All was shortly quiet in Portsmouth, but the alarm had 
spread into the interior, and great excitement existed 
throughout the State, not allayed till some days after, when 
the report was contradicted. 

The company of " sea fencibles " enlisted under the au- 
thority of the War Department, named in the letter of the 
Secretary of War to Governor Gilman was commanded by 
Capt. John S. Davis, of Portsmouth. Its roll was as fol- 
lows : 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



129 



Roll of Capt. John S. Davis's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Remarks. 


John S. Davis, Captain, 








William P. Adams, Lieut. 








PRIVATES. 








Aaron Adams, 


July 25, 1814 


Mar. 29, 1815 




Thomas Brown, 


18 






William Bachelder, 


22 






Dudley Burnhain, 


Sept. 21 






Obadiah Bean, 


July 21, 1815 






Isaac Berry, 


Sept. 15, 1814 






John Broughton, 


July 8 


Oct. 13,1814 




Caleb I. Gushing, Gunner, 


15 


Mar. 29, 1815 




David E, Clarke, 


Aug. 19 






Peter Drown, jr., Gunner, 


July 21 






Robert Davis, " 


Oct. 14 






Oliver Davis, 


June 24 






John Daniels, 


Aug. 5 






Samuel Davis, 


Oct. 14 






Jonathan Downing, 


Aug. 31 


Sept. 21 




John Fair, 


Jan. 24, 1815 


Mar. 29, 1815 


- 


William M. Fernald, 


July 12, 1814 






Robert Fernald, 


14 






Benjamin Fernald, 


Sept. 8 






Francis L. Greenough, 


July 22 






Isaac Gay, jr. 


Oct. 14 






William Haley, 


June 24 






John P. Hill, 


July 11 






Joshua B. Hill, 


Aug. 4 






John I. Hill, 


3 






John S. Hill, 


13 






Samuel C. Hutchins, 


Sept. 14 






Thomas Hastings, 


Oct. 5 


Mar. 29, 1815 




John Horn, 


14 






William Hofires, 


Dec. 17 






Thomas Jenkins, jr. 


July 30 






James Jeffrey, 


30 






John Jenkins, 


Oct. 17 






John Johnson, 


Sept. 14 






John Kair, Gunner, 


July 4 






Joshua Kerswell, 


30 






Joseph Keen, 


Aug. 17 






Robert B. King, 


29 






Nathaniel Lovering, 


July 25 






Thomas Levitt, 


Sept. 5 






Thomas Mating, Gunner, 


June 23 






James Mayce, 


Jan. 24, 1815 






Nathaniel Morrison, 


Feb. 13 






Thos. Morris, Waiter, 








Robert Simpson, 


June 24, 1814 






Charles Saunders, 


Oct. 15 






Henry Sheriff, 


Sept. 21 






George Rymes, 


June 22 






John P. Row ell, 


Aug. 8 






Edward Richardson, 


Dec. 16 






Henry Tucker. 


July 13 






Josiah Tuck, 


Aug. 24 






John Tilton, 


24 






William SrTarlton, 


8 






Winthrop Tilton, Waiter, 








David Underbill, 


July 29,1814 






Simon Wallace, 


Aug. 3 






Samuel Welch, 


Sept. 19 






Aaron Wilsoii, 


Jan. 9, 1815 






Robert Willey, 


July 15, 1814 







130 

At length, the people becoming thoroughly aroused, Gov- 
ernor Gilman yielded to their demands, and on the 7th of 
September issued orders for detachments from twenty-three 
regiments of the militia, and on the 9th of September is- 
sued general orders to the militia of the State, ordering the 
entire body, including infantry, cavalry and artillery, " to 
hold themselves in readiness to march at a moment's warn- 
ing," ordering the detachments already made to march im- 
mediately for Portsmouth ; the companies in the 1st and 
35th Regiments to turn out for drill three times a week, 
and making a further draft from the militia of two compa- 
nies from each of the 2d, 3d, 4th and 25th Eegiments, and 
one from the 35th Regiment, to march immediately for Ports- 
mouth, the farthest to be there on or before the 12th day of 
the month. 

These orders were as follows : 

STATE OF ^EW-HAMPSHIEE. 

" Headquarters, Exeter, September 9th, 1814. 
General Orders: — 

" Whereas the recent depredations of the enemy npon the sea- 
board of the United States make it necessary for the country to be 
in complete readiness for defense, and that forces in addition to 
those already ordered in this State should be called forth immedi- 
ately : 

" The Commander-in-Chief orders: That the whole of the militia, 
including infantry, cavalry, and artillery, hold themselves in read- 
iness to march at a moment's warning, completely armed and 
equipped according to law, and as well provided as possible with 
blankets and ammunition. And whereas there are a large number 
of men able to bear arms, who are, by our militia laws, exempted 
from ordinary military duties, they are hereby invited and re- 
quested, in the present alarming state of the country, to assemble 
in their respective towns, organize themselves into companies, and 
prepare for defense in case it should become necessary. 

"The detachment made from twenty-three regiments of the 
militia by General Orders of the 7th instant, will march to Ports- 
mouth from their respective regiments immediately. The General 
and Field Officers in their respective districts, will see that this or- 
der is carried into immediate effect, and that the troops be as well 
provided as possible with blankets and ammunition. 

" The First and Thirty -fifth Regiments, (being near the sea- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 131 

board), and all the companies within the limits of said regiments, 
are directed to turn out by companies at least three times in each 
week ( until further orders ) for perfecting- themselves in military 
discipline, excepting one company in the 35th Regiment, detached 
by these orders. 

"The Commander-in-Chief further orders: That four entire 
companies of infantry from each of the following regiments, to wit ; 
the Second, Third, Fourth and Twenty-fifth, and one entire com- 
pany from Stratham, in the Thirty-fifth Regiment, be detached 
immediately, armed and equipped according to law, and provided, 
as far as possible, with blankets and ammunition, to march to 
Portsmouth immediately ; (those companies at the greatest dis- 
tance to be there on or before Monday, the 12th instant,) to serve 
for the term of fifteen days, from the time of their arrival at Ports- 
mouth unless sooner discharged. The commanding officers of the 
several regiments are respectively charged with the execution of 
this order. 

"The several officers of the militia will avail themselves of the 
powers with which they are invested by the laws of the State, for 
supplying any deficiency of arms and equipments. 

" The Commander-in-Chief relies with confidence on the patri- 
otism of the good citizens of this State, and on their exertions, 
for the protection and defense of the country. 

J. T. GILMAN, 
Governor, C apt. -General, and Commander-in-Chief." 

These orders were sent by express throughout the State, 
and were obeyed with the greatest alacrity. So great was 
the enthusiasm among the people, that whole companies, 
paraded for the purpose of being drafted, volunteered, and 
a draft had to be made rather of those who should stay at 
home, than those who should go to defend our country. 

The brigade, regimental and staff officers had been ap- 
pointed, and when the troops arrived at Portsmouth they 
were organized as follows : 



132 



Brigade Staff Roll. 
John Montgomery, Brigadier-General. 
James I. Swan,* Brigade-Major. 
Geo. H. Montgomery,! Aid-cle-Camp. 
E. Smith, Waiter. 
Freeman Grow, Waiter. 
Jason Bachus, " 
H. Symes, " 

Field and Staff Officers of the First Regiment of 
Detached Militia. 
Nat. Fisk,J Lt. Colonel Commandant. 
James H. Pierpont, Surgeon. 
Caleb Reynolds, Quartermaster Sergeant. 
Aaron Coffin, Chief Musician. 

*Maj. Swan was a lawyer of Bath, of fine abilities, and among the most eminent in 
the State. He died about 1821. 

t George H. Montgomery was a son of the General, and died shortly after the war. 

t Colonel Nat. Fisk was from Westmoreland. He was born in Framingham, Mass., in 
1787. He came to Westmoreland in early life, and established himself in his trade, 
that of a clothier. After a time, having been successful in business, he opened a store, 
and became a successful merchant. He was Major of the 1st Battalion of the 20th 
Regiment N. H. Militia. In 1814 he was appointed Lieut. Colonel of the same battalion. 
In September of that year he was appointed to the command of the 1st Regiment of 
detached soldiers for the defense of the sea-board, and was stationed as above. Re- 
turning to Westmoreland at the expiration of the time for which his regiment was 
detached, he continued to reside there until about 1830, when he returned to Framing- 
ham and became a farmer upon his paternal homestead. In or about 1856, while upon 
a visit to Westmoreland, where a daughter resides, he died suddenly of heart disease, 
aged 69 years. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 133 

Roll of Capt. Timothy Putnam's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Timothy Putnam, Captain, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Three months 


Lyndeboro'. 


John Peavy, 1st Lieutenant, 








' 


Barn stead. 


James B. Todd, 2d " 








' 


Peterboro'. 


Richard Webster, jr. 3d Lt. 








i 


Gilmanton. Absent, sick. 


Jason Dunster, jr. Ensign, 








1 


Mason. 


David Putnam, Sergeant, 








' 


Lyndeboro'. 


Joseph Fellows, " 








' 


Gilmanton. 


Ely ah Knapp, " 








1 


Mason. 


John Daniels, " 








1 


Barnstead. 


Benj. Stevens, " 








1 


Gilmanton. 


Ahimes Jewett, Corporal, 








1 


Peterboro'. 


Samuel Wyman, "■ 








1 


Sharon. 


Daniel Goss, " 








i 


Gilmanton. 


Jeremiah Dow, " 








" 


Barnstead. 


James Gammon, Musician, 








" 


Gilmanton. 


Joseph Drew, " 






" 


Barnstead. 


PRIVATES. 








John Ames, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Three months 


Peterboro'. Transferred to 
Capt. Marsh's Company. 


Moody Blood, 




(< 


New Ipswich. Discharged, 
being taken by a warrant 
Oct. 22, 1814. 


Ashley Brook, 
Wm. Boutell, 






<< 


New Ipswich. 






>> 


Lyndeboro'. 


Wm. Berry, 








Barnstead. 


Timothy Bunker, 






" 


Barnstead. 


Truston Conner, 






" 


Gilmanton. 


John Currier, 






a 


Wilton. 


John Cram, 






a 


Lyndeboro'. Absent, sick. 


Benj. Darling, 






" 


Temple. 


Jeremiah Davis, 






tt 


Temple. [7, 1814. 


Robert McDaniels, 






" 


G uilford Discharged Nov. 
Mason. Discharged. Nov. 7, 

1814. 
Gilmanton. » 


Josiah Elliot, 






" 


David Edgerly, 






tt 


Thomas Foster, 






tt 


Guilford. 


James Edwards, 






tt 


Gilmanton. [6, 1814. 


Wm. Frohock, 






" 


Guilford. Discharged Nov. 


Abner Flint, 






it 


Wilton. 


Emory Foster, 






a 


Wilton. 


Wm. Foster, 






" 


Mason. Absent, sick. 


Wiggin Farrar, 






a 


Gilmanton. 


Bela Gardner, 






tt 


New Ipswich. 


John Gray, 






a 


Peterboro'. 


Daniel Giiman, 






" 


Gilmanton. 


John Jenness, 






" 


Barnstead. 


Levi Grant, 






" 


Gilmanton. 


Nathan A. Holt, 






" 


Temple. 


Sanmel Holt, 






" 


Wilton. [7, 1814. 


Aaron Holden, 






" 


Wilton. Discharged Nov. 


William Hall, 






a 


New Ipswich. Discharged 


Ira Hall, 






" 


Mason. [Nov. 7, 1814. 


Alfred Heald, 






tt 


Temple. 


John T. Haggot, 






a 


Peterboro'. 


Hazen Kimball, 






a 


Gilmanton. 


John Lougee, 






" 


Barnstead. 


David Miller, 






it 


Peterboro'. [7, 1814. 


John Moore, 






" 


Sharon. Discharged Nov. 


James Moore, 






ti 


Sharon. Discharged Oct. G, 
1814. 


Robert Morrison, 






tt 


Peterboro'. Discharged 
Nov. 8, 1814. 


Anthony Nutter, 






» 


Barnstead. Transferred. 


Benj. Putnam, 






" 


Lyndeboro'' 


Ebenezer Price, 






" 


Gilmanton. 


John Russell, 






" 


Lyndeboro'. [1814. 


Wm. Russell, 






<< 


Lyndeboro'. Died Nov. 10, 


Jonas Smith, 






" 


New Ipswich. 


Sewall Spaulding, 








' 


New Ipswich. 



134 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



Roll of Capt. Putnam's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


James Spaiilding, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Three months 


New Ipswich. 


Brown Shattuck, 


" 




Peterboro'. 


Amos Shattuck, 


" 




Wilton. 


Joseph Sanders, 


a 




Mason. [Capt. Marsh's Co. 


Nath. Smith, 


a 




Peterboro'. Transferred to 


Jeremiah Sanborn, 


a 




Gilmanton. 


John Sanborn, 


a 




Barnstead. 


George Sanders, 


(< 




Guilford. 


Samuel Stevens, 


" 




Gilmanton. 


Tyler Town, 


" 




Lyndeboro'. 


Win. Upton, 


a 




Peterboro'. Transferred to 
Capt. Marsh's Co. 


Aaron Wilkins, 


" 




Wilton. 


Benj. Wetherbee, 


" 




Mason. 


Samuel Wadsworth, 


it 




Mason. 


Benj . Williams, 


" 




New Ipswich. 


David Wilson, 


" 




Peterboro'. 


James Wilson, 


ll 




Wilton. 


Joseph Wood, 


" 




Mason. Discharged Nov. 4. 


Ephraim Woodward, 


a 




Lyndeboro'. 


Luther Wright, 


a 




Temple. [Nov. 6. 


Henry Weeks, 


a 




Barnstead. Discharged 


Jacob West, 


" 




Barnstead. 


Jona. Whicher, 


a 




Gilmanton. Transferred to 
Capt. Marsh's Company. 


John B. Wright, 


<( 




New Ipswich. 


Joseph H. Howe, 


" 




Guilford, 


Andrew Daniels, 


" 




Barnstead. 


Mark W. Plummer, 


" 




Guilford. 


David Chapman, 


" 




Trans'd to Capt. Marsh's Co. 


Andrew Kimball, 


" 




Trans'd to Capt. Marsh's Co. 


James Hill, 


" 




Trans'd to Capt. Marsh's Co. 


Jacob Pollard, 


a 




Guilford. 


Jacob Barter, 


" 




Lyndeboro'. 


Eben'r Pitman, 


" 




Barnstead. 


Leonard Putnam, Waiter, 


« 




Lyndeboro'. 


Joseph Peavy, " 


" 




Barnstead. 


John Philbri'c, " 


ti 




Gilmanton. 



military history of new-hampshire. 135 

Roll of Capt. Jonathan Bean's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Jonathan Bean, Captain, 


Sept. 11,1814 


Ninety days 


Salisbury. Joined Sept. 16, 
'1814. Discharged Nov. 11, 

Hopkinton. Acting as Quar- 
termaster from Sept. 18th, 


Thomas Towne, 1st Lieut. 




" 














1814. 


Ephraim Presbv, 2d " 




" 


Bradford. 


William Gay, 3d " 




<< 


Wilmot. 


Bichard Little, Ensign, 




n 


Boscawen. 


Calvin Cilley, Sergeant, 




n 


Andover. 


Nicholas Evans, " 




a 


Warner. 


Robert Knovvlton, " 




a 


New London, 


Moses Gould, " 




a 


Hopkinton. 


Levi Fowler, " 




it 


Sutton. 


Josiah Sanborn, Corporal, 




a 


Andover. 


Joel B.Wheeler, " 




a 


Warner. 


Samuel Robey, " 




" 


Sutton. 


Alpheus Cross, " 






Fishersfield. Disch'd Nov. 


Moses Call, Musician, 


«( 


a 


Boscawen. [13, 1814. 


Moses Putney, " 






Sutton. Discharged Nov. 9, 
1814. 


PRIVATES. 








Eobert A. Bradley, 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Ninety days 


Hopkinton. 


Enoch Burbank, 


" 


" 


Boscawen. 


Samuel Burbank, 


a 


" 


Hopkinton. 


Barrach Cass, 


a 


a 


Hopkinton. [1814, 


Moses Cross, 


ti 


tt 


Boscawen. Disch'd Nov 9, 


David C. Currier, 


it 


a 


Hopkinton. Sick in hospi- 


Stephen Danforth, 


it 


tt 


Boscawen. [tal. 


Charles Cilley, 


it 


a 


Andover. 


Amos Eastman, 


" 


it 


Hopkinton. 


John Eastman, 


" 


a 


Boscawen. 


John J. Emerson, 


11 


a 


Hopkinton. 


Benjamin Fifield, 


" 


" 


Salisbury. 


Moses Fifield, 


tt 


" 


Salisbury. 


Samuel Fifield, 


tt 


" 


Salisbury. 


Enoch Fifield, 


a 


it 


Salisbury. 


Jacob Flanders, 


a 


" 


Boscawen. 


Josiah Gale, 


a 


" 


Boscawen. 


Nicholas Gookin, 


a 


tt 


Boscawen. 


James B. Goodwin, 


it 


it 


Andover. 


Nathaniel Graves, 


" 


a 


Andover. 


Matthew P. Hunt, 


" 


it 


Salisbury. 


Joseph S. Huntoon, 


" 




Andover. 


John C. Huse,,jr. 


tt 


a 


Andover. Sick in hospital. 


Simeon Jackman, 


a 


it 


Boscawen. 


William Johnson, 


" 


a 


Salisbury. 


John Johnson, 


« 




Salisbury. 


Joseph Kimball, 


" 


a 


Andover. 


Nehemiah Lowell, 


it 




Salisbury. 


Joseph Moore, jr. 


it 


a 


Boscawen. Enlisted in U.S. 
service, Oct. 29, 1814. 


Eben'r Morrill, 


tt 


it 


Hopkinton. 


John Morey, 


it 


tt 


ETopkinton. 


Moses Osgood, jr. 


tt 




Salisbury. Enlisted in U. S. 
service, Oct. 1. 1814. 


Isaac Pearce, 


11 


a 


Hopkinton. 


Hazen Putney, 


" 




Hopkinton. [1814. 


Jona. Roberts, jr. 


" 


tt 


Andover. Disch'd Nov. 10, 


Matthew Sanborn, 


tt 


" 


Salisbury. 


Nathaniel Stevens, 


tt 


" ! 


Salisbury. [1814, 


Jacob Straw, 


n 


" 


Hopkinton. Disch'd Nov. 9, 


Joseph Wadley, 


a 


a 


Vndover. Disch'd Nov. 9, 
1814. 


Samuel B. Wadley, 


" 


a 


\ndover. Sick in hospital. 


Jesse Wardwell, 


it 


tt ] 


Salisbury. 


John Webster, 


tt 


a 


\ndover. 


Wm. Wheeler, 


» 


" ] 


lopkinton. 


Daniel Shephard, 


" 


" J 


3oscawen. 


Samuel P. Collins, 


• < 


" 


Bradford. 


Gershom B. Cass, 


(t 


it 


Wilmot. 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 

Roll of Capt. Bean's Co. — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


David Cox, jr. 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Ninety days 


Wilmot. 


Jonathan Collins, 








Fishersfield. 


John Clogsdon, 








Sutton. 


Isaiah I. Colby, 








Warner. 


John Davis, 








New London. 


Edmund P. Dodge, 








Fishersiield. 


Mariner Eastman, 








Warner. 


Sherburn Emerson, 








Bradford. 


John French, 








Sutton. [1814. 


Joseph Goodwin, 








Warner. Disch'd Nov. 12, 


Seth Goodwin, 








Warner. Enlisted in IT. S, 
regl'r service Oct. 29, 1814. 


John Goodwin, 








Warner. 


Nath. Hunt, 








Warner. 


Fifield Hartford, 








Wilmot. 


David H. Kelley, 








Warner. 


James G. Ring, 








Warner. 


John Harriman, 








Bradford. [1814. 


James King, 








Sutton. Discharged Nov. 1, 


Jona. Morse, 








Bradford. 


Jerry Morey, 








Wilmot. 


David Marshall, 








New London. Disch'd Nov. 9 


Daniel Morse, 








Fishersheld. [1814. 


James Philbrick, 








Sutton. 


Christopher Gray, 








Wilmot. 


James H. Stevens, 








Warner. 


Stephen Sargent, 








Warner. 


T. W. Sargent, 








Bradford. 


Abraham Smith, 








Bradford. 


Daniel Sargent, 








Bradford. Sick in hospital. 


True worthy Sargent, 2d, 








Bradford. 


Timothy Peasley, 








Sutton. 


Nath. Messer, 








New London. 


David Gile, 








New London. 


Thomas Thurber, 








Warner. 


Obadiah Wells, 








Fishersheld. 


James Little, 








Sutton. 


Abner S. Colby, 








Warner. Died Oct. 31, 1814. 


Samuel Burbank, 








Boscawen. 


John Stone, 








Boscawen. Absent, sick. 


Phineas Bean, Waiter, 








Salisbury. 


Jona. Gay, " 








Wilmot." 


Moses Geard, " 








Bradford. 


Jacob Harvey, " 






Warner. Died Oct. 31, 1814. 



militaky history of new-hampshire. 137 

Roll op Capt. Samuel Collins's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Samuel Collins, Captain, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Three months 


Deerfield. Joined Sept. 15, 


Bickford Lang, 1st Lieut. 




' 


" 


Epsom. [1814. 


Thomas Berry, jr., 2d " 




' 


a 


Pittsheld. 


Moses Hezelton, 3d " 




' 


a 


Chester. 


Henry Osgood, Ensign, 




i 


" 


Raymond. 


Daniel Haynes, Sergeant, 




i 


" 


Deerfield. 


Jonathan Cass, 




* 


" 


Candia. 


James Severance, " 




t 


a 


Chester. 


Samuel Drake, " 




e 


" 


Chichester. 


John Wevmouth, " 




' 


a 


Nottingham. 


Josiah Whicher, Corporal, 




1 


a 


Candia. 


John Brown, jr. " 




1 


it 


Raymond. 


True Brown, " 




1 


a 


Deerfield. 


James C. Rand, " 




1 


n 


Chester. 


James Haynes, Musician, 




1 


" 


Epsom. 


Stirling Sargent, " 


" 


it 


Allenstown. 


PRIVATES. 








Daniel Ames, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Three months 


Allenstown. 


Bradbury Brown, 


" 


" 


Deerfield. 


Squires Bachelder, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Ebenezer Brown, 


" 


" 


Raymond. 


Ephraim Brown, 


" 


i( 


Pittsheld. 


Samuel Batchelder, 


<< 


u 


Deerfield. 


Jonathan Batchelder, 


it 


tt 


Chichester. 


John Brown, 


a 


" 


Chester. 


Joseph Clitt'ord, 


a 


« 


Candia. 


Nehemiah Clay, 


tt 


" 


Chester. 


Joseph Chase, jr. 


a 


a 


Chester. 


Daniel Carr, 


a 


" 


Chester. 


Henry Clifford, 


a 


'■ 


Raymond. 


Richard Currier, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Gilman D. Cass, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Jonathan Clitt'ord, 


it 


<< 


Pittsheld. 


True Currier, 


it 


" 


Deerfield. 


Abraham Cram, 


" 


" 


Deerfield. 


Ebenezer Chapman, 


" 


" 


Nottingham. 


Samuel Chapman, 


" 


" 


Epsom. 


Benjamin Clark, 


" 


n 


Epsom. 


Valentine Davis, 


*' 


n 


Nottingham. 


John Dearborn, 


" 


" 


Deerfield. 


Reuben Dearborn, 


" 


" 


Chichester. 


Samuel Davis, 


" 


" 


Epsom. 


Jonathan Emerson, 


" 


H 


Candia. 


David Emerson. 


" 


" 


Chester. 


Edward Edmunds, 


" 


" 


Pittsheld. 


Stephen Emerson, 


" 


" 


Pittsfield. 


James P. French, 


" 


(( 


Candia. 


Benjamin French, 


n 


a 


Chichester. 


Benjamin Goss, jr. 


" 


a 


Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 


Reuben Gale, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Nathan W. Gove, 


" 


" 


Nottingham. 


George Hill, 


" 


" 


Northwood; 


Phineas Healey, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Abraham Knight, 


" 


" 


Pittsfield. 


Oliver Knowlton, 


" 


" 


Northwood. 


Joseph Knowlton, 


" 


" 


Northwood. 


Alexander S. Lear, 


" 


" 


Epsom. 


Peter M. Mills, 


a 


tt 


Chester. 


Henry Morse, 


" 


" 


Raymond. 


Burnham Morrill, 


it 


" 


Northwood. 


Jonathan Mnlloon, jr. 


" 


" 


Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 


Nathaniel Marston, 


" 


" 


Deerfield. 


John B. Maxfield, 


it 


" 


Chichester. 


David Odel, 


" 


it 


Nottingham. 


John Palmer, 


a 


" 


Deerfield. 


Christopher Page, 


" 


tt 


Chichester. 


Samuel Roberts, 


" 


n 


Raymond. 


Daniel Robey, 


" 


it 


Raymond. 


Simeon Rand, 




it 


it 


Nottingham. 



138 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Collins's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Reuben Richardson, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Three months 


Xottingham. 


John Runnels, 


(i 


" 


Nottingham. 


John Smith, 


<« 


a 


Northwood. 


David Shaw, 


<( 


(i 


Chichester. 


Micajah R. Stanyan, 


K 


" 


Epsom. 


David Tandy, 


(( 


" 


Deerrield. 


John Towle, 


a 


u 


Candia. 


Haly True, 


a 


11 


Raymond. 


Jeremiah Towle, 


** 


a 


Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 


William Trefethen, jr. 


*' 


a 


Pittsrield. 


Jacob Wallace, 




a 


Deerfield. 


James White, 




tt 


Deerrield. 


Isaac Willee, 


'• 


c< 


Northwood. 


Daniel McDuffee, 


•' 


a 


Chester. 


John Ham, Waiter, 




u 


Epsom. 


Daniel Trefethen, " 


" 


" 


Kittery. 


John Lang, 


" 


" 


Epsom. 


Henry Trefethen, " 


it 


" Kittery. 



military history of new-hampshire. 
Roll of Capt. Phineas Stone's Company. 



139 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



For what time 



Residence and Remarks. 



Phineas Stone, Captain, 
Joseph Cochran, 1st Lt 
Nath. N. Shannon, 2d " 
Thos. H. Moulton, 3d " 
Peter C. Hadley, Ensign, 
Thomas R. Taggart, Sergt 
Job Sargent, " 

Jonathan Parmer, " 

Elisius Barron, " 

Jonathan C. Johnson, " 
Enoch Gile, " 

Stephen G. Stearns, Corp 
William McGaffey, " 
Timothy Clark, " 

Israel Trank, " 

Joseph Butterfield, " 
John McAfee, " 

Eleazer Kidder, Musician 
James Beard, " 

Richard W. Cooper, " 
Moses Prescott, " 

PRIVATES. 

Zenas Adams, 
Daniel Bradstreet, 
John Barr, 
Oliver Belcher, 
James Butterfield, 
Wm, Balch, 
Eleazer Butters, 
Enoch Butters, 
Jonathan Bryant, 
Ebenezer Burley, 
Samuel Campbell, jr. 
John Colby, 
Luther Clements, 
Daniel M. Clements, 
Josiah Cilley, 
Jonathan Cogswell, 
Thomas Clements, 
Amos Church, 
Asa Clay, 
David Downs, 
Joel Dale, 
Otis D. Densmore, 
Jobn Elliot, 
Jonathan Flanders, 
Samuel Ferson, 
John Fogg, 
Josiah Farwell, 
David Grant, 
Wm. Gray, 
Nathan Goodwin, 
Archibald Gamble, 
Nathaniel Glines, 
James George, 
Moses J. Glines, 
Joseph Graves, 
Nehemiah Hardy, 
Parson Hardy, 
John Holmes, 
Wm. Hodge, 
Lynes Hoi't, 
Dudley Hawkins, 
Libseus Hayford, 
Josiah Jenness, 
Richard Lakeman, 
Luther Locke, 
Thomas Lord, 
Ephraim K. Lamper, 



Sept. 12,1814 



Three months 



Sept. 12,1814 



Three months 



Weare. Joined Sept. 14, '14. 
New Boston. 
Wolfborough. 
Centre Harbor. 
Gofistown. 
Dunbarton. 
Goffstown. 
Tamworth. 

Gofistown. [leave. 

Sandwich. Absent without 
Dunbarton. Promoted from 
Gofistown. [Corp. to Sergt. 
Sandwich. Transf. to Capt. 
Wolfborough. [Marsh's Co. 
Gofistown. 
Gofistown. 
Bedford. 

Gofistown. Prom. prin.Mus. 
New Boston. Promoted 
Weare. [principal Music'n. 
Sandwich. Transf. to Capt. 
[Converse's Co. 



Goffstown. 

Gofistown. 

Bedford. 

Weare. 

Weare. 

New Boston. 

Dunbarton. 

Dunbarton. 

Sandwich. 

Sandwich. Transf. to Capt. 

Bedford. [Marsh's Co. 

Weare. 

Dunbarton. 

Dunbarton. 

New Boston. 

New Boston. 

Dunbarton. 

Sandwich. Ab.witho't leave. 

Tamworth. 

Tamworth. 

Centre Harbor. 

Tamworth. 

Sandwich. 

Weare. 

New Boston. 

Sandwich. Ab.witho't leave. 

Sandwich. Ab.witho't leave. 

Weare. 

Weare. 

New Boston. 

Manchester. 

Wolfborough. 

Sandwich. 

Wolfborough. 

Sandwich. 

Goffstown. 

Gofistown. [out leave. 

Wolfborough. Absent with- 

Sandwich. [Marsh's Co. 

Tamworth. Trans, to Capt. 

Centre Harbor. Sick in 

Tamworth. [quarters. 

Moultonborough. 

Goffstown. 

Weare. 

Dunbarton. [leave. 

Sandwich. Absent without 



140 



adjutant-general's report. 



Roll of Capt. Stone's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


David McDole, 


Sept. 1,1814. 


Three months 


Goffstown. 


John Measure, 




" 


Dunbarton. 


Nathan Merrill, 






New Boston. Sick in quar 


Noah Moulton, 






Sandwich. [terg 


Isaac Meeder, 






Tarn worth. Trans, to Capt 


John Martin, 






Bedford. [Marsh's Go 


"Win. Montgomery, 






Bedford. 


Isaac Nichols, 






Dunbarton. 


Jonathan Ordway, 






Weare. 


Robert Ordway, 






Gott'stown. 


Elias Peabody, 






Bedford. 


John Philbrick, 






Weare. 


Jonathan Page, 






Gott'stown. 


George Philbrick, 






Weare. 


Wm. Pope, 






Weare. 


Nathaniel Peasly, 






Weare. 


David Patterson, 






Gott'stown. 


Robert Purple, 






Gott'stown. Absent withou 


True E. Richards, 






Gott'stown. [leave 


John Rogers, 






Wolfborough. 


Herman Rogers, 






Tatn worth. Absent withou 


Otis Shephard, 




" Bedford. [leave 


James Stark, 




" Dunbarton. 


Wm. Stark, 






Dunbarton. 


Josiah Sprague, 






Manchester. [leave 


John Shaw, 






Sandwich. Absent withou 


Josiah Smith, 






Sandwich. Trans, to Capt 


Antipas V. Tallant, 






Gott'stown. [Marsh 


Benjamin Tenny, jr. 






Weare. 


Abraham Trout, 






New Boston. 


Robert Tibbetts, 






Centre Harbor. Sick in 


George Woodman, 






Weare. [quarters 


James Walker, 






New Boston. [out leave 


Jacob Wallace, 






Wolfborough. Absent with 


Orlando Weed, 






Sandwich. Absent withou 


Washington Cutte, Waiter, 
Joseph Lewis, " 






Kittery. [leave 






KitterV. 


Asa Frisbee, " 




" iKittery. 



-^ 



military history of new-hampshire. 141 

Roll of Capt. Nathan Glidden's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



For what time. 



Residence and Remarks. 



Nathan Glidden, Captain, 
Moses Judwine, 1st Lieut. 
Aby ah Whitcomb, 2d " 
Luther Huntley, 3d " 
Wm. Cary, jr., Ensign, 
Joseph Knight, Sergeant, 
Amos Stone, '* 

Thomas Smith, " 
Cyrus Anger, 
Abel A. Burbank, " 
Roj'al Sarzwell, Corporal, 
Nath. Graves, " 

Phineas Stone, " 
Eli Darling, " 

Josiah Smith, Musician, 
Loring Shattuck, *' 

PRIVATES. 

Samuel Chambel, 
Eben'r Vickery, 
Simeon Pike, 
Ford Merrill, 
Lewis Patch, 
Moses Brooks, 
Silas Chamberlin, 
Luther Keed, 
Willard Rogers, 
Joel P reast, 
Abraham Barker, 
Reuben Wale, 
Samuel Mordory, 
John Lewis, 
Samuel Comstock, 
David Norly, 
Selden Brown, 
James Brown, 
Rosen Anger, 
Richard Tinker, 
Jesse Whitney, 
Oliver W. Thomas, 
John Smith, 
Josiah Lovkin, 
Daniel Graves, 
Jeremiah Parker, 
Thomas Farwell, 
Aaron Beals, 
Henry Steel, 
Daniel W. Baker, 
Samuel Davis, 
Enoch Phil brie, 
Justen Prouty, 
Pardon Prouty, 
Trueman Blood, 
Warren Read, 
Guy Adams, 
James T. Allen, 
Charles Corbin, 
Elijah Darling, 
Moses Carpenter, 
William Delano, 
Jesse Wheeler, 
Caleb Miller, 
Harris Bartlett, 
Guy Carleton, 
David Joslin, 
Wilder Knight, 
Job Brooks 
Wm. Howard, jr. 
Gardner Town, 
Samuel Upton, 



Sept. 33, 1814 



Three months 



Sept. 13, 1814 



Three months 



Unity. Joined Sept. 20, '14. 

Charlestown. 

Swansey. [1814. 

Marlow. Disch'd Nov. 11. 

Lempster. 

Stoddard. 

Chesterfield. 

Unity. 

Acworth. Disch'd Nov. 10. 

Washington. Died Nov. 14. 

Langdon. Disch'd Nov. 10. 

Acworth. Died Nov. 12. 

Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 9. 

Chesterfield. Disch'd Nov.3. 

Unity. 

Hinsdale. 



Unity. Disch'd Nov. 11. 
Unity. 



Unitv 

Unity. 

Unity. 

Lempster. 

Lempster. 

Lempster. 

Lempster. 

Lempster. 

Lempster. 

Marlow. 

Marlow. 

Marlow. 

Marlow. 

Marlow. 

Marlow. 



[leave. 
Absent without 



Disch'd Nov. 9. 

Disch'd Nov. 10. 

Disch'd Nov. 10. 

Disch'd Nov. 10. 

Disch'd Nov. 10. 

Sick in hospital. 
Transf d to Capt Marsh's Co 
Acworth. Disch'd Nov. 10. 
Acworth. 
Richmond. 

Transf d to Capt Marsh's Co 
Transf d to Capt Marsh's Co 
Transf d to Capt Marsh's Co 
Acworth, Disch'd Nov. 10. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 

Langdon. Disch'd Nov. 11. 
Langdon. 



Langdon. 

Langdon. 

Charlestown, 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Charlestown. 

Charlestown. 

Stoddard. Disch'd Nov. 9 

Stoddard. Disch'd Nov. 11 

Stoddard. Disch'd Nov. 10 

Stoddard. 

Stoddard. 

Stoddard. 



[11. 

Disch'd Nov. 



[11. 
Disch'd Nov. 






142 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Oapt. Gltdden's Co. — concluded. 



■ Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


David Scott, 


Sept. 13, 1814 


Three months. 


Stoddard. Disch'd Nov. 3 


Olando Wright, 




" 


Stoddard. Disch'd Nov. 11 


Win. Fay, 




«< 


Al stead. 


Nath. Nilas, 




it 


Alstead. Sick in hospital. 


Alvah Walker, 




" 


Alstead. 


David Wheelock, 




»* 


Alstead. Disch'd Nov. 12 


Silas Newton, 






Alstead. 


Asa Wbitcomb, 






Alstead. 


Eben'r Caipin, 






Transf 'd to Capt Marsh's Cc 


Wm. Miller, 




" 


Atstead. 


David Marr, 




" 


Alstead. 


Lewis Sully, 




M 


Trans t 'd to Capt Marsh's Cc 


Cyrus Shattuck, 




<< 


Hinsdale. 


George Jo v ford, 




" 


Hinsdale. Disch'd Nov. 18 


Stafford Petty, 




" 


Hinsdale. 


Samuel Barrett, 




<( 


Hinsdale. Disch'd Nov. 18 


George Hooker, 




a 


Hinsdale. 


Samuel Hawbrey, 




k 


Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 8 


Wm. Stephenson, 




" 


Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 15 


Benedict Arnold, 




n 


Swansey. Died Nov. 9. 


Rufus Guild, 




H 


Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 8. 


Reuben Worcester, 




it 


Swansey, 


Caleb Thompson, 




" 


Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 8. 


Ira Graves, 




K 


Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 8. 


Wm. More, 




11 


Swansey. 


Cromwell Kelton, 




(C 


Richmond. 


Chandler Mann, 




(( 


Richmond. 


John Whitney, 




" 


Ac worth. 


Arnold Mann, 




t( 


Richmond. 


Daniel Buffum, 




" 


Richmond. 


Nath. Thompson. 




<( 


Richmond. Disch'd Nov. 8 


John Smith, 




(( 


Winchester. Disch'd Nov. 8 


Ezekiel Graves, 




a 


Winchester. [1C 


John B. Oldham, 




cc 


Winchester. Disch'd Nov 


Clark Narramore, 




" 


Winchester. 


John Carleton, 




« 


Winchester. Disch'd Nov. 9 


Wm. Howard, jr. 




" 


Winchester. Dischargee 
Nov. 18. [at Portsmouth 


George W. Allen, 




tt 


Winchester. Absent, sick 


Jonathan Hotton, 




f< 


Winchester. 


Charles Goodwin, 




i< 


Winchester. 


Ezra Willis, 




a 


Winchester. Disch'd Nov. 8 


Joshua Wiggins, 




a 


Chesterfield. Dischargee 
Nov. 10. 


Francis Minch, 




cs 


Chesterfield. 


Stephen Streeter, 




" 


Chesterfield. 


Rowell Metcalf, 




a 


Chesterfield. [6. 


Montgomery Darling, 




" 


Chesterfield. Disch'd Nov. 


Isaac Witherby, 




a 


Chesterfield. Discharged 
Nov. 10. [at Portsmouth. 


Ezra Putney, 




11 


Chesterfield. Absent, sick 


Alpheus Shattuck, 




11 


Winchester. 


Levi Tilton, 




tt 


Winchester. 


Samuel Barrow, 




tt 


Winchester. 


Moses W. Butterfield, 




a 


Lempster. 


Ira Ladd, Waiter, 




a 




John B. Hubbard, " 




(i 




Byfield Carey, " 




" 





MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 143 

Roll op Capt. Nathaniel G. Bradley's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



For what time. 



Remarks. 



Nath. G. Bradley, Captain, 
Hosea Belknap, 1st Lieut. 
Samuel Moore, 2d Lieut. 
Thomas Nesmith, 3d Lieut. 
Reuben Thompson, Ensign, 
Thays B. Powell, Sergeant, 
Samuel Eliot, " 

William Abbott, " 

Hazen Little, " 

Richard Bagley, " 

Tristam Dow, Corporal, 
Amos Davis, " 

Samuel Jack, " 
Thomas Rogers, " 
Peter Sanders, Musician, 
Enoch S. Baker, " 
Abraham Amazine, Waiter. 
John Tarleton, " 

William Holbrook, " 

PBIYATES. 

Samuel Langley, 
Joseph Hutchinson, 
Elijah Marcey, 
Benj. Buntin, 
Willoughby Colby, 
Robert Haines, 
Enoch E. Bradley, 
Willie Tasker, 
Thomas Shaw, 
Robert Evans, 
William Berry, 
Loammi Reed, 
Levi Sargent, 
Amos Abbott, 
Hazen B. Elliot, 
John Haines, jr. 
Benj. Whidden. 
Benj. Sanborn, jr. 
James Proctor, 
John Moor, 
Thomas Puffer, 
Enoch Bachelder, 
John Bacli elder, 
Samuel Dwinnels, 
William Glines, jr. 
James Allord, 
John Stevens, 
Josiah A. Woodbury, 
Peter French, 
Moses Carr, 
Abraham S. Bradley, 
Enoch Moor. 
Joseph F. Miner, 
Daniel Rogers, 
Alvah Gilman, 
Eben'r Currier, 
Moses Thorn, 
Enoch Smith, 
James Lines, 
Samuel Trickey, 
William McCormick, 
Jona. Corliss, 
David Woodbury, 
Enoch Goodwin, 
Amos Shipley, 
Tristam Kimball, 
Philip Curtis, 
Joseph Norton, 
Isaac Emerson, 



Sept. 15, 1814 



Three months 



Sept. 15, 1814 



Three months 



Discharged Nov. 4, 1814. 



144 



adjutant-general's report. 



Roll of Capt. Bradley's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


John Elkins, 


Sept. 15, 1814 


Three months 




Samuel Wallace, 


a 


" 




Stephen Kemp, 


" 


" 




James V. Kemp, 


it 


" 




Joseph Clark, 


" 


" 




David Bennet, 


ft 


11 




Nath. Gage, 


ft 


a 




Stephen Warner, 


ft 


<( 




Thomas Pettee, 


ft 


tt 




Thomas Follansbee, 


« 


it 




John Page, 


ft 


" 




William B. Shute, 


a 


n 




Phineas Baily, 


" 


a 




Thomas Runnels, 


t. 


" 




John G. Sanborn, 


<( 


" 




James Proctor, jr. 


11 


" 




Ben,j. Carter, 


" 


" 




Richard Randall, 


" 


" 




Jeremiah Jameson, 


" 


« 




David Leciester, 


it 


<< 




Tristam Pilsbury, 


a 


tt 




Amos Perry, 


" 


" 




John Wood, 


" 


" 




John Arnold, 


<_ 


" 




William Griffin, 


" 


<< 




Gilman Goodrich, 


" 


" 




Francis Flanders, 


it 


'< 




John Tucker, 


<• 


<» 




John Wells, 


• < 


" 




James Sanborn, 


" 


" 




Sylvanus Hoyt, 


«< 


tt 




David Paul, 


" 


11 




John Pearson, 


" 


<< 




Bagley Carter, 


" 


tt 




Stephen Bean, 


" 


a 




James Foster, 


tt 


" 




James Dow, 


'« 


ft 




Benj. Bradley, 


" 


a 


Discharged Nov. 9, 1814. 


John Griffin, 


a 


it 




Charles A. Morse, 


" 


" 




Enoch Flood, 


" 


«« 




Joseph Eaton, 


« 


» 




Allison Randall, 


" 


" 




Benj. Dressor, 


ft 


<( 




John Moffit, 


« 


it 




Bishop Knight, 


" 


it 




Moses Sleeper, 


u 


" 


[vice Sept. 24, 1814 


William Bailey, 


a 


" 


Enlisted into regular ser 


Jonathan Jennings, 


it 


" 


Enlisted do. do. Oct. 13 '14 


Zachariah B. Knight, 


" 


" 


Discharged Sept. 20. 1814. 


Daniel Smith, 


" 


" 


Discharged Oct 8. 1814. 



military history of new-hampshire. 
Roll of Capt. Hugh Moore's Company. 



145 



Names. 



When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Sept. 13, 1814 

5 


Three months 


Francestown. 

Antrim. 

Effingham. 




it 


Hancock. 

Wakefield. 

Deering. 

Hillsborough. 

Henniker. 

Wolfborough. 




H 
(( 


Wolfborough. 
Hillsborough. 
Greenfield. Sick in Quart's 




<« 


Henniker. 

Ossipee. 




(I 


Francestown. 
Wolfborough. Missing. 


Sept. 13, 1814 
(< 

(< 
«< 


Three months 
tt 

n 
a 

<« 


Henniker. 

Francestown. Sick in Qrs 

Wolfborough. 

Antrim. 

Hancock. 

Antrim. 

Hancock. 

Deering. 

Francestown. 

Francestown. 

Greenfield. 




n 

tt 


Henniker. 

Henniker. 

Henniker. 

Tuftonborough. Disch'd. 

Wolfborough. 


" 


ti 


Tuftonborough. 


tt 


a 


Hancock. 


(i 


a 


Hillsborough. 


u 




Antrim. 
Greenfield. 


tt 


it 


Deering. 

Greenfield. 

Wolfborough. 


a 


a 


Hillsborough. 
Hillsborough. 




tt 

it 


Effingham. 
Antrim. 
Francestown. 
Hancock. 


;; 


tt 


Hancock. 

Antrim. 

Henniker. 


" 


tt 


Henniker. 


« 


tt 
tt 


Hancock. 
Tuftonborough. 


« 


it 
it 


Ossipee. 
Wolfborough. 


i, 


a 
a 
ft 


Francestown. 

Tuftonborough. 

Wolfborough. 


" 


tt 


Francestown. 


a 


it 


Wolfborough. Missing, 
Effingham. 
Effingham. 
Effingham. 


u 

tt 
tt 
a 
a 


tt 
tt 


Deering. 

Hillsborough. Died Nov. 4, 

Ossipee. [1814. 

Antrim. 

Hillsborough. [5, 1814. 


" 


it 


Henniker. Discharged Nov. 



Hugh Moore, Captain, 
David McCauley, 1st Lieut. 
Abraham Menston, 2d " 
Thatcher Bradford, 3d " 
Joseph Dame, Ensign, 
David Forsaith, Sergeant, 
Kansom Bixby, " 
Joseph Marsh, " 

John Fullerton, " 
John Drew, " 

Beuben Wheeler, Corporal, 
Joseph H. Richardson," 
Ammis Goss, " 

John Templeton, " 

Lewis Cram, Musician, 
Mark Lucas, " 

PRIVATES. 

John Adams, 
Francis Austin, 
Walter Avery, 
Peter C. At wood, 
Isaac Brot>ks, 
John Barker, 
Benjamin Ball, 
Jesse Brown, 
Joseph Butterfield, 
Robert Butterfield, 
John W. Bean, 
Daniel Campbell, 
Amis Campbell, 
Alexander Caldwell, 
Nathaniel Chase, 
Ichabod Cook, 
Job Colcord, 
Abraham Davis, 
George Dascomb, 
Thomas Dunlap, 
Jonathan Dutton, 
William Eaton, 
Israel Ewins, 
Theodore Ewins, 
Ebenezer Flint, 
Isaac Fariar, 
Stephen Fowler, 
Thomas Gregg, 
Ira Fislier, 
John Gilson, 
William Gray, 
Charles Gates, 
Charles Greenleaf, 
John T. Gilman, 
Jesse Hall, 
Nathaniel Hodgdon, 
John Horsham, 
Jacob Harvey, 
John Hopkins, 
John Hanson, 
Joseph P. Judkins, 
John Loring, 
Andrew Lucas, 
Thomas Leavit, 
Dearborn Leavitt, 
Dearborn Lovering, 
James Mansie, 
Muses McClintoch, 
Daniel Moody, 
Alexander Parker, 
Merrill Pierce, 
Levi Patterson, 

10 



146 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Moore's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Mark Pierce, 


Sept. 13, 1814 


Three months ;Hancock. 


Joseph Pierce, 










Francestown. 


Robert Quimby, 










W T akefield. 


Joseph L. Perry, 










Tuftonborough. 


John Roberson, 










Antrim. 


James Ross, 










Antrim. 


Curtis Robbins, 










Hillsborough. 


Lyman Robbins, 










Hillsborough. 


Levi Rhodes, 










Deering. 


Nathaniel D. Richardson, 










Wolfborough. 


Peter Rumrill, 










Hancock. 


Edward Smith, 










Henniker. 


Ezra Smith, 










Francestown. 


Charles Stiles, 










Francestown. 


Levi Thompson, 










Antrim. 


Peter Twist, 








1 Peering. 


Daniel Templeton, 










Hillsborough. 


William Tripe, 










Wolfborough. 


Samuel Vose, 










Antrim. 


John Whittaker, 










Deering. 


Sweat Worthly, 










Henniker. 


Joseph Waugh, 








' Peering. 


Ira Walker, 








' Antrim. Died Nov. 3, 181 


Isaac Wilkins, 










Deering. 


Nathaniel Wilkins, 










Deering. 


John R. Wright, 










Francestown. 


John Wilson, 










Greenfield. 


John Wilson, jr. 










Greenfield. 


David Wilkins, 










Greenfield. 


William Waison, 










Ossipee. 


George Wiggin, 










Tuftonborough. 


Daniel Moor, 












Thomas Phillips, 












Abraham Bray, 






' 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 147 

Roll of Capt. Josiah Converse's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Josiah Converse, Captain, 


Sept. 16, 1814 


Three months 


Amherst. Joined Sept. 16. 


Simon W. Robinson, 1st Lt., 


" 




Transferred to field and 


Jonathan Gate, jr., 2d Lt., 


u 




West Nottingham. [staff. 


Alexander Caldwell, 3d Lt,, 


** 




West Nottingham. 


"William Emerson, Ensign, 


a 




West Nottingham. 


Samuel Leonard, Sergeant, 


•' 




Amherst. 


Demetrius Halcomb, " 


« 




Sanbornton. 


Henry H. Ray, 


" 




Mont Vernon. 


Luther Elliott, " 


ii 




Amherst. 


Noah Dockham, " 


a 




Meredith. 


Stephen B. French, Corp., 


a 




Amherst. 


Nathaniel Burleigh, " 


" 




Sanbornton. 


Moses Gillman, " 


a 




Sanbornton. 


Joseph Hartshorn, " 


<< 




Amherst. 


Daniel Johnson, Musician, 


" 




Sanbornton. [ter Saunders. 


Moses Prescott, " 


a 




Milford. Substitute tor Pe- 


PRIVATES. 








Dean Ames, 


Sept. 16, 1814 


Three months 


Meredith. 


David Burleigh, 






Sanbornton. 


Ephraim Burse, 






Sanbornton. 


Squire Blauchard, 






Dunstable. 


David Bills, 






Brookline. 


Joshua Moses, 






Litchfield. Substitute for 


Robert W. Brown, 






Litchfield. [Robert Bixby. 


James Batchelor, 






Milford. 


Samuel Cotton, jr., 






Merrimack. 


Isaac Conery, 






Dunstable. 


Robert Colburn, jr., 






Dunstable. 


Josiah Combs, 






Merrimack. 


John Cotton, 






Merrimack. 


"William Cawley, 






Sanbornton. 


Bernard Wilkinson, 






Meredith. Substitute for 


John Campbell, 






Milford. [Robert Gate, jr. 


Chase Crockett, 






Meredith. 


Nathaniel Danforth, 4th, 






Sanbornton. 


David Elliot, 






Amherst. 


Nath. Fellows, 






West Nottingham. 


David Fisk. 3d, 






Amherst. 


Barachias Farnham, 






Sanbornton. 


Andrew Folsom, 






Meredith. [21st Sept., 1814. 


Benjamin Farnham, 






N. Hampton. Discharged 


Samuel J. Drew, 






N. Hampton. Substitute 
for Meshach Fogg. 


Stephen Harriman, 






N. Hampton. • Substitute 
for William Fogg. 


Ebenezer Gilman, 






Brookline. Substitute for 


Ebenezer Gilman, 






Brookline. [Sam. Glines. 


Daniel Green, 






Meredith. Died Get. 27, 


Rufus Gordon, 






Meredith. [1814. 


Daniel Gillman, 






Amherst. 


Jonathan Howard, 






Amherst. 


Benjamin Hassell, 






Meredith. 


Benjamin Hastings, 






Meredith. 


Moses Hunt, 






Meredith. Deserted Oct. 1, 


Mark Harris, 






Dunstable. [1814. 


Enoch Hilliard, 






Mont Vernon. 


Benj. Jewell, jr., 






Amherst. 


John Jones, 






Mont Vernon. 


John Johnson, 






West Nottingham. 


Zephaniah Kittredge, 






Dunstable. 


John M. Kuhn, 






Amherst. 


Levid Lund, 






West Nottingham. 


Samuel M. Livingston, 






Amherst. 


Elijah Marshall, 






Merrimack. 


Erastus Marshall, 






Merrimack. Enlisted in U. 


John March, 






Meredith. [S. service 


Samuel McClench, 






Meredith. 


Samuel McClure, 






Mont Vernon. 


Benjamin Pease, jr., 






Amherst. 



148 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Converse's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time . 


Residence and Remarks. 


Jesse Pearson, 


Sept. 16, 1814 


Three months 


Sandown. 


Joseph Perkins, 




" 


Meredith. Sick in hospital. 


Haven Parker, 




" 


Dunstable. 


David Philbrick, 




<< 


Dunstable. 


Chase Pike, 




" 


Milford. 


Stephen Presby, 




" 


Meredith. 


Samuel Roby, 




" 


Milford. 


John Raymond, 




<( 


Brookline. Sick in hospital. 


Moses Russell, 




" 


Brookline. Disch. Nov. 4. 


John Rollins, 




a 


Nottingham. Discharged 


Jeremiah Swain, 




tt 


Brookline. [Sept. 21, 1814. 


Oliver Stearns, 




a 


Meredith. 


John Smith, 




a 


Dunstable. 


Samuel Steele, 




a 


Nottingham. 


Robert Seavy, jr., 
Abraham Tilton, 




" 


Sanborn ton. 




" 


Meredith. 


John Twist, 




" 


Sanborn ton. 


Seth Tupper, 




" 


Sanbornton. 


Wm, M. Sherley, 




a 


Meredith. 


Moses Smith, 




'< 


Sanbornton. 


Joseph Thompson, 




(( 


West Nottingham. 


Benj. Twist, 




(( 


Meredith. 


Simeon Veasey, 




" 


Milford. 


Luther Wallace, 




" 


Sanbornton. 


Richard Wallace, 




ft 


Litchfield. Died 5th Oct., 


William Whidden, 




<« 


Mont Verizon. [1814. 


Cyrus Wilkins, 




" 


West Nottingham. 


James Mason, 




" 


Sanbornton. 


Samuel Wait, 




" 


Litchfield. 


John Watt, jr., 




<( 


Meredith. 


John S. Mason, 




•< 


Sanbornton. 


Nathaniel Woodman, 




" 


Sanbornton. 


Beryamin Shaw, 




<( 


Meredith. 


Nathaniel Proctor, 


'« 


i. 


Sanbornton. 


Ebenezer Howe, 


" 


a 


Brookline. 


Noah Robertson, 


«< 


<( 


Sanbornton. 


John Wiggins, 


" 


a 


Sanbornton. 


Sewall Smith, 


'• 


it 




Robert Converse, Waiter, 


" 


a 




John L. Lock, " 


<< 


" 





military history of new-hampshire. 149 

Roll of Capt. Oliver Warren's Company. 



Names. 



Remarks. 



Oliver Warren, Captain, 
Samuel Seward, 1st Lieut., 
Charles Gross, 2d " 
L. Wellington, 3d " 
Henry Mason, Ensign, 
Sam. C. Thayer, Sergeant, 
Boyal Fairbanks, " 

Ethel Parmenter, " 
Sylvester Smith, " 

Ben,]'. Brown, . " 

Solomon Soutle, Corporal, 
Geo. Austin, " 

Chas. Jewett, " 

Samuel Stratton, " 

Samuel Dalton, Musician 
Otis Gilbert, " 

PRIVATES. 

Abel Briggs, 

Amos Wood, 

John Foster, 

Dana Hans, 

Ralph Huntingdon, 

Daniel Utley, 

Geo. King, 

John Bice, jr., 

Iddo Kilburn, 

Elisha Sawyer, 

Ihubel Plympton, 

Joseph Young, 

John Kaymond, 

Michael Sanders, 

John Calder, 

John Wellington, 

Thomas Wyman, 

Abner Keith, 

Edmund C. Moore, 

Daniel Lagrose, 

Daniel Allen, 

Wm. Wright, 

John Hartwell, 

Joel Crandall, 

Jona. Bobbins, 

Adolphus Fletcher, 

Eleazer Jordan, 

Walter Benton, 

Henry Fiink, 

Lines Fairbanks, 

Boswell Boyden, 

Tisdell Duggett, 

James Wyman, 

Edwin Wheeler, 

Otis Briggs. 

Athnial S. Cross, Drummer, 

Moses Emery, 

Daniel A. Carpenter, 

Jonas Chadwich, 

Stacy Hodkins, 

Henry Hapgood, 

Moses Hunt, 

Abail Nutting, 

Parker Fish, 

Isaac Cutter, 

Zolpha Baker, 

Wm. Williams, 

Wilder Brooks, 

Leprilet Newcomb, 

David Towser, 

Lanson Walker, 

John Bichards, 



Sept. 20, 1814 



Sept. 20, 1814 



Three months 



Three months 



Discharged Nov. 9, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 11, 1814. 



Discharged Nov. 5, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 9, 1814. 

Sick, absent by permission. 
Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 11, 1814. 



Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 



Transferred to Capt.Marsh's 
Co., Sept. 20. 

Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 



Discharged Oct. 3, 1814. 



Transferred to Capt.Marsh'i 
Co., Sept. 3, 1814. 



Deserted Oct. 3, 1814. 

Transfer'd to Capt. Marsh's 

Co., Sept. 20, 1814. 
Discharged Oct. 3, 1814. 

Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 



Discharged. 



150 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Warren's Company — concluded. 



Names. 



When enlisted. For what time. 



Remarks. 



Leonard Colburn, 
Joseph Pickerell, 
Elia Wheeler, 
Jackson Greenwood, 
Benj. Fife, 
Henry II. Cutter, 
Nathan D. Barker, 
John Twitchell, 
Jona. Taylor, 
Abner Fairbanks, 
Sherman R. Redfield, 
John Williams, 
Wm. Thatcher, 
Jonathan Wood, 
Wm. Kimball, 
Calvin Chase, 
Henry Kendall, 
Nathan Ballard, 
Joab Erleith, 
Matthew Templeton, 
Francis Butler, 
Geo. Fenno, 
Stephen H. Fletcher, 
Harding Darby, 
James White, 
Andrew Pinkham, 
Ithamar Frost, 
Ira Varney, 
Joseph Krand, 
Richard Rand, 
Geo. Tibbetts, 
Edmund Williams, 
John H. Mooney, 
Joseph Hutchins, 
Elijah Goodwin, 
Isaiah Davis, 
Benj. Richards, 
John Hodge, 
Isaiah Hodgsden, 
W T m, Watson, 
Aaron Varney, 
Joseph Hogdens, 
Enoch Carson, 
Nath. Durgin, 
Justus Chapin, 
John M. Cobb, 
Amos Dodge, 
3 Waiters, 



Sept. 20, 1814 Three months 



Discharged. 



Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 

Discharged Nov. 9, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 

Discharged Nov. 16, 1814. 



Deserted Oct. 2, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 
Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 



Transf d Capt 
Transf'd Capt 
Transt'd Capt 
Transf d Capt 
Transt'd Capt 
Transf'd Capt 
Transt'd Capt 
Transt'd Capt 
Transf d Capt 



Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 
Kimball's Co 



Transf'd Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf'd Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf <1 Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Joined Sept. 26. 1814. 
Transf d Capt Kimball's Co 
Discharged Nov. 7. 1814. 
Joined Sept. 21. 1814. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



151 



Roll of Capt. Joseph Kimball's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. For what time. 

1 


Residence and Remarks. 


Joseph Kimball, Captain, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Three months 


Plainfield. 


David Dwinel, Lieutenant, 




" 


Newport. 


John Rollins, " 


10 


" 


Alton. 


Abiather Young, Ensign, 


12 


■' 


Wendell. 


David Dean, " 


" 


tt 


Claremont. 


James Osgood, Sergeant, 


21 


tt 


Claremont. 


Isaac F. Hunton, " 


12 


" 


Claremont. 


William Stiles, " 


" 


" 


Goshen. 


Solomon Dunham, " 


tt 


a 


Newport. 


Jona. Wentworth, " 


" 


a 


Cornish. 


Zazheus Perkins, " 


it 


a 


New Durham. 


John Sholes, Corporal, 


a 


t. 


Goshen. 


Nell Whittier, " 


it 


" 


Plainfield. 


John Diggin, " 


" 


" 


Claremont. 


Win. Heath, Fifer, 


(c 


" 


Newport. 


John Page, Drummer, 


" 


it 


Springfield. 


PRIVATES. 




a 




Levi Winter, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Three months 


Croydon. 


Israel Cooper, 


" 


tt 


Croydon. 


Nehemiah Parker, 


" 


" 


Cornish. 


James Coburn, 


" 


" 


Cornish. 


Benj. B. Bemis, jr., 


" 


" 


Cornish. 


Clark Kendrick, 


" 


it 


Cornish. 


Moses Gilbert, 


it 


it 


Cornish. 


Thomas Spooner, 


a 


it 


Cornish. 


Oliver King, 


tt 


'• 


Cornish. 


Jesse Kimball, 


ti 


a 


Cornish. 


James Chellis, 


n 


" 


Cornish. Sick in hospital. 


Samuel Stone, 


tt 


" 


Claremont. Disch'd Nov. 7, 


John McDaniels, 


a 


" 


Claremont. [1814. 


Charles C. Stewart, 


a 


tt 


Claremont. 


Benedict Tayler, 


" 


" 


Claremont. 


Shaler Buel, 


it 


a 


Claremont. 


Andrew Bartlet, 


tt 


" 


Claremont. 


Henry G. Lane, 


" 


" 


Claremont. 


John Colby, 


" 


" 


Goshen. Sick in hospital. 


Aaron Young, 


" 


" 


Newport. 


John Field, 


tt 


" 


Newport. 


Lovel Shurtliff, 


tt 


it 


Newport. 


Joshua Pierce, 


" 


tt 


Newport. 


Stephen Herrick, 


" 


tt 


Newport. Sick in hospital. 


Wingate Webster, 


" 


it 


Newport. 


Harvey Thatcher, 


tt 




Newport. 


Oliver Cutts, 


" 




Newport. [1814. 


Lomo McGregory, 


it 


n 


Newport. Disch'd Nov. 7, 


Wm. Carr, 


" 




Newport. [17, 1814. 


Levi Pierce, 


et 


" 


Sew Grantham. Died Nov. 


John Gage, 


tt 


tt 


New Grantham. 


Nath. Calf, 


a 


li 


New Grantham. 


Joel Hunter, 


11 




New Grantham. 


Zephaniah Pierce, 


" 




Plainfield. 


Cyril Drown, 


tt 


n 


Plainfield. 


Robert Cory, 


it 




Plainfield. 


John Patterson, 


a 


tt 


Plainfield. 


Samuel Barrows, 


it 




Plainfield. 


Thomas Pool, 


" 




Plainfield. [1814. 


Daniel True, 


" 




Plainfield. Disch'd Nov. 7, 


Eliphalet Minor, 


tt 




Plainfield. 


Stephen H. Heath, 


tt 




Springfield. [1814. 


Adam Boys, 


" 




Springfield. Disch'd Nov. 3, 


Jona. Heath, 


a 




Springfield. Died Nov. 3, 


James Perkins, 


" 


it 


Springfield. [1814. 


Joseph Chase, jr., 


a 


a 


Wendell. 


Moses Follansbee, 


" 




Wendell. 


Charles Gage, 


" 


tt 


Wendell. Sick in hospital. 


Nathan Rogers, 


" 


<c 


Wendell. 


Sylvanus Lathe, 


it 


" 


Claremont. 


Daniel Rogers, 


" 


It 


Alton. 


Ira Varney, 


" 


it 


Alton. 



152 adjutant-general's report. 

Eoll of Capt. Kimball's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Joseph Hodgdon, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Three months 


Alton. Disch'd Nov. 5, 1814 


Nath. Durgin, 






Alton. 


John Hartford, 






Alton. 


Andrew Kirkham, 






Alton. 


Isaiah Davis, 






Alton. 


Itharnar Frost, 






Middleton. 


Enoch Corson, 






Middleton. 


Nath. Rines, 






Middleton. 


Benj. Richards, 






Middleton. 


George Tebbetts, 






Brookfield. 


John Hodge, 






Brookfield. 


Richard Rand, 






Pittsfield. [12. 1814 


John M. Copp, 






Wakefield. Disch'd No\ 


Edward Witham, 






Wakefield. 


Gilman Cloutman, 






Wakefield. 


John Brown, 






Wakefield. [1814 


Isaiah Hodgdon, 






Wakefield. Disch'd Nov. 5 


Josiah Leavitt, 






N.Grantham. Sickinhos' 


Jason Trumbull, 






New Grantham. 


Benj. Perkins, 






Claremont. 


Joseph Rand, 






Alton. [1814 


Abyah Dunbar, 






Croydon. Disch'd Nov. 1 


Joseph Grace, Waiter, 






Portsmouth. 


Abijah Dean, " 






Claremont. 


John Hunton, " 






Newport. 



military history of new-hampshire. 
Roll op Capt. John Marsh's Company. 



153 



Names. 


"When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


John Marsh, Captain, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Three months 


Eaton. Join'd Sept. IS, 1814. 


Sli Glines, 1st Lieut., 


" 


" 


Eaton. 


Jona. Stark, 2d " 


" 


tt 


Conway. Sick in quarters. 


Tames Farrington, Serg't., 


18 


" 


Conway. 


[ra Crocker, " 


" 


<< 


Conway. 


Samuel Stark, " 


a 


it 


Conway. 


James Lang, " 


a 


it 


Eaton. 


)avid Allen, " 


" 


lt 


Eaton. 


5ben'r Wileason, Private, 


'* 


tl 


Eaton. Discharged Nov. 9, 


Jona. Smart, Corporal, 


" 


" 


Ossipee. [1814 


Abraham Colby, " 


a 


" 


Eaton. 


Marshal Henman, " 


(i 


" 


Eaton. 


Tames Hill, " 


it 


it 




Andrew Boswell, Musician, 


u 


" 


Conway. Discharged Nov, 


William Boswell, " 


" 


" 


Conway. [3, 1814. 


PRIVATES. 








Samuel Allard, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Three months 


Benton. 


Jashum Allard, 


" 




Benton. 


Samuel Burk, 


it 




Eaton. 


Ibshua Bickford, 


" 




Eaton. 


saac Bickford, 


" 




Eaton. Discharged Nov. 9, 


Dolman Colby, 


" 




Eaton. [1814. 


Szekiel Currier, 


" 




Eaton. 


Ibhn Chase, 


" 




Benton. Died Oct. 26, 1814. 


Samuel Clerk, 


<« 




Eaton. 


|Lth. Coffin, 


ct 




Conway. 


)aniel Crocker, 


tt 




Conway. 


Stephen Danfqrd, 


(< 




Eaton. 


saac Davis, 1st, 


« 




Eaton. 


Fames Drew, 


" 




Eaton. 


Samuel Drown, 


" 




Eaton. 


saac Davis, 2d, 


" 




Tamworth. 


Samuel Deering, 


a 




Benton. 


Jeremiah Eastman, 


" 




Conway. 


Adams Forrist, 


a 




Eaton. 


Simon Furmold, 


" 




Eaton. 


Cnoeh Folsom, 


" 




Eaton. Sick in hospital. 


Andrew Ham, 


a 




Eaton. 


Hoses Harriman, 


" 




Conway. 


Samuel Harriman, 


" 




Eaton. 


)avid Harriman, 


44 




Conway, 


)aniel Kimball, 


" 




Effingham. 


Fohn Kimball, 


" 




Effingham. 


Robert Meeder, 


H 




Eaton. Died Nov. 13, 1814. 


Robert Moulton, 


" 




Benton. 


Sumphrey Mason, 


" 




Tamworth. 


Hartin Mush, 


" 




Eaton. 


John Nason, 


" 




Eaton. 


Sath. Kemnaick, 


« 




Eaton. 


3enj. Stacy, 


" 




Eaton. 


Wm. Stacy, 


it 




Eaton. 


fm. Taylor, 


a 




Effingham. Discharged. 


rhomas Varney, 


tt 




Tamworth. 


Wm. Ayres, 


18 




Wakefield. 


Abial Bridges, 


a 




Westmoreland. 


)tis Briggs, 


" 




Westmoreland. 


James Brown, 


" 




Acworth. 


Eben'r Burley, 


n 




Sandwich. 


Asa Clay, 


n 




Tamworth. 


Eben'r Capen, 


21 




Alstead. 


Samuel P. Daniels, 


18 




Ossipee. 


David Downs, 


17 




Tamworth. 


Joel Dale, 


" 




Centre Harbor. 


Otis Densmore, 


" 




Tamworth. Disch'd Nov. 7, 


John Elliott, 


18 




Sandwich. [1814. 


Jeremiah Elliott, 


17 




Sandwich. 


John Fogg, 


17 




Sandwich. 


Josiah Farwell, 


" 




Sandwich. Disch'd Nov. 12, 


James Hill, 


" 




Gilmanton. [1814. 


John Holmes, 


tt 




Moultonborough. 



154 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll op Capt. Marsh's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remark 


James Hoyt, 


Sept. 17,1814 


Three months 


Eaton. Disch'd Nov. 12. 


Jona. C. Johnson, 


" 




Sandwich. Disch'd Nov. 


Andrew Kimball, 


15 




Gilmanton. [IS 


Pearson Kenison, 


18 




Effingham. 


Cyrus Luf kin, 


21 




Acworth. 


Ephraim Sanborn, 


18 




New Hampton. 


Isaac Meeder, 


17 




Tamworth. Disch'd N 


Wm McGaffey, 


18 




New Hampton. [12, 18 


Anthony Nutter, 


15 




Gilmanton. 


Jonathan Robbins, 


21 




Westmoreland. Dischar^ 


Herman Rogers, 


17 




Tamworth. [Nov. 12, 18 


Jona. Smith, 


" 




Sandwich. Disch'd Nov 


John Shaw, 


" 




Sandwich. [18 


Lewis Salo, 


21 




Alstead. 


Samuel Stewart, 


18 




Effingham. Disch'd N 


Wm. Tripe, 


18 




Effingham. [12, M 


Oliver Thomas, 


21 




Acworth. 


Jona. Whicher, 


15 




Sanbornton. 


Orlando Weed, 


17 




Tamworth. Absent, sicl 


Matthew Wentworth, 


18 




Wakefield. 


John Smith, 


21 




Acworth. Sick in hospil 


Benj. Hables, 


18 




Effingham. Disch'd Nov. 


Zachariah Nock, 


it 




Wakefield. Absent, sick 


Jona. Nock, 


" 




Wakefield. Died Nov. 


Eben'r Howe, Waiter, 


16 




New Hampton. [IS 


Hamilton Edmunds, " 


a 




Conway. 


Charles Hodsdon, " 


" 




Conwav. 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



155 



ield and Staff Eoll of the Second Regiment De- 
tached Militia. 
John Steele,* Lieut.-Colonel Commandant. 
Abijah Powers, Major. 
John H. Fuller, Adjutant. 
George W. "Walker, Quartermaster. 
Joh n Angier, Surgeon's Mate. 
Jacob Dunklee, jr., Quartermaster's Sergeant. 

Eoll of Capt. James M. Warner's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


imes M. Warner, Capt., 


Sept. 25,1814 


Sixty days 


Acworth. Reported Oct. 2. 


lampin Spaulding, 1st Lt. 




" 


Plainfield. Died Oct. 12, '14. 


illiam Wyman, 2d Lt., 




a 


Walpole. Sick, present. 


wid Blanchard, 3d Lt., 




" 


Acworth. 


ijah Huntley, Ensign, 




" 


Marlow. 


iron Baker,Sgt. and Ok. 




" 


Walpole. [7, 1814. 


Weatkerbee, Sergeant, 




" 


Surry. Discharged Nov. 


ivid Dort, " 




" 


Gilsum. 


jnjamin Grout, " 




it 


Acworth. 


)hn Griffin, " 




" 


Marlow. 


len Slade, Corporal, 




" 


Alstead. 


wis Reed, " 




" 


Westmoreland. 


jorge Baxter, " 




fi- 


Surry. 


ma. Mansfield, Corporal, 




ll 


Stoddard. 


ijak Waldo, " 




" 


Langdon. 


ijak Barrows, Musician, 




" 


Westmoreland. 


lswortk Hubbard, " 




" 


Sullivan. 


PRIVATES. 








larles V. Ames, 


Sept. 25, 1814 


Sixty days 


Lempster. 


motky Alby, 




" 


Charlestown. 


mbrose Alexander, 




« 


Acworth. 


aomas P. Alexander, 




it 


Acworth. 


domas Ball, 




n 


Acworth. 


enry Bemis, 




" 


Westmoreland. 


)nes Brown, 




n 


Gilsum. 


avid Bell, 




11 


Gilsum. 


)seph Barney, 




n 


Acworth. 


swis Boutell, 




11 


Charlestown. [7, 1814 


saph Beck with, 




11 


Surry. Discharged Nov. 


orace Beckwith, 




it 


Marlow. 


ired Beckwith, 




" 


Marlow. 


aphas Clark, 




(< 


Westmoreland. 


ilvin Clark, 




" 


Acworth. 


osiah Colomy, 




it 


Keene. 


r illard Carpenter, 




it 


Surry. 


lijah Cooper, 




n 


Walpole. 


aniel W. Clyde, 




n 


Acworth. 


athew M. Campbell, 




n 


Acworth. 


ekiel Day, 




n 


Keene. Sick, present. 



* Lieutenant-Colonel John Steele was of Peterborough, where he was born in 1772. 
te was Major of the 2d Battalion of the 22d Regiment, from 1789 to 1814, when he was 
ppointed Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of his regiment. As such he commanded 
le 2d Regiment of Detached Militia, at Portsmouth, in 1814. He was appointed 
olonel of the same in 1816, and held that office until 1820, when he was appointed 
rigadier-General of the 4th Brigade. He was appointed Major-General of the 3d 
ivision in 1823, and held that commission until 1825, when he resigned. He was a 
rmer of integrity and respectability, and died August 10, 1845, aged about 74 years. 



156 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Warner's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remar 


Elijah Davis, 


Sept. 25,1814 


Sixty days 


Sullivan. 


Joseph Dunn, 






Stoddard. 


Ralph Dodge, 






Stoddard. 


James Davidson, 






Acworth. 


Ira Ellis, 






Gilsum. 


Asa Ellis, 






Sullivan. 


Silas Fuller, 






Surry. 


Prentiss Foster, 






Walpole. [Nov. 9, 


Benj . French, 






Washington. Discha 


Samuel Grant, 






Walpole 


Obadiah Goodale, 






Stoddard. 


Thaddeus Graves, 






Washington. 


Daniel Garfield, 






Langdon. [Nov. 9, 


Zera Hutching, 






Westmoreland. Discha 


George Hilton, 






Charlestown. [9, 


Aaron Huntley, 






Marlow. Discharged 


William Hun toon, 






Unity. 


Samuel Hunt, 






Charlestown. 


Elon Henry, 






Charlestown. [7, 


Jeremiah Healy, 






Alstead. Discharged 


Jonathan Hall, jr., 






Westmoreland. Discha 


Benj. Jenkins, 






Stoddard. [Oct. 12, ] 


Zebadiah Keys, 






Keene. 


Charles Kingsbury, 






Walpole. 


John Kingsbury, 






Alstead. 


John Kimball, 






Stoddard. 


Levi Leonard, 


" 




Walpole. 


"Walter Lalend, 


" ? J 




Sullivan. Died Nov. 9, 1 


Edward Lawrence, 


• dSJ 




Washington. 


George Metcalf, 


mr 




Keene. 


Isaac Miller, jr., 


<9 




Keene. [26, 1 


John Miller, 


. it 




Alstead. Discharged 


Isaiah Miller, 


it 




Alstead. 


John Mervin, 


" 




Marlow. 


Artemas Messer, 


it 




Alstead. 


Samuel Nichols, . 


(( 




Walpole. 


Samuel Newman, 


(( 




Washington. 


Otis Elliott, 


it 




Washington. 


Daniel Peck, 


it 




Langdon. 


Charles Perry, 


a 




Charlestown. 


Luther Ripley, 


a 




Walpole. 


Nathan Richardson, 


it 




Washington. [Nov. 9, 


Daniel Rogers, 


(t 




Lempster. Discha 


Moses Rabb, 


a 




Stoddard. 


Martin Ray, 


n 




Lempster. 


Hiram Rue. 


(t 




Langdon. 


Phineas Richardson, 


it 




Charlestown. 


Edmund Simmons, 


a 




Westmoreland. 


John Stevens, 


ti 




Sullivan. 


Elisha Stevens, 


it 




Stoddard. [Nov. 9, 1 


Soames Steel, jr., 


it 




Charlestown. Discha 


Harry Spaulding, 


" 




Charlestown. [Nov. 9, 1 


Timothy Scott, 


a 




Lempster. Discha 


Samuel Slade, 


ft 




Alstead. 


Daniel Severance, 


it 




Washington. 


Herman Stricklin, 


it 




Lempster. 


Charles Titus, 


« 




Walpole. 


Asa Wares, jr., 


" 




Keene. 


George Way, jr., 


ti 




Walpole. 


Leonard Way, 


" 




Lempster. 


Aaron Wheeler, 


« 




Walpole. 


Charles Wheeler, 


" 




Westmoreland. 


John Wheeler, 


« 




Lempster. Discha 


Jesse Williams, 


it 




Alstead. [Nov. 9, 1 


Calvin Wilson, 


it 




Stoddard. 


Lewis Willard, 


a 




Charlestown. [Oct. 12, 1 


Joseph Welborn, 


it 




Westmoreland. Discha 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 157 

Roll of Capt. Edward Fuller's Company. 



Names. 



"When enlisted 



For what time. 



Residence and Remarks. 



Iward Fuller, Captain, 
>hn Emery, Lieutenant, 
5a Head, " 

aac S. Sargent, Ensign, 
,muel Whitehouse, " 
ble Read,Sergt. and Clerk, 
,muel Seavey, Sergeant, 
illiam Ham, " 

!hn Parker, jr., " 
jnuel G. Sutton, " 
illiam Knox, jr., " 
iron Martin, Corporal, 
;uben Osgood, " 

lineas Hodgdon, " 
•seph R. Maxneld, " 
iter Tucker, Musician, 
idrew Gott, " 

•escott Kendall, " 
jnjamin Rollins, " 

PRIVATES. 

,muel S. Moulton, 
ephen Hays, 
th Baker, 
;vy Baker, 
lomas Martin, 
ilin Conner, 
ephen Chickering, 
lase Prescott, 
dediali Edmons, 
illiam Fife, jr., 
Jorge French, 
jorge Wheeler, 
avid Brown, 3d, 
chard Welch, 
muel Kelly, 
)bert Knox, 
iseph Knox, 
)hn Davis, 
illary Knox, 
athaniel Lakeman, 
)bert Moor, jr., 
ihn Morison, 
illiam Roach, 
aac Knox, 
lomas Knox, 
iniel Kimball, 
>seph Moutchen, 
hn Nixon, 
larles Rowell, 
mrnel Roberson, 
aac C. Swan, 
>seph Seavey, 
ihn Philips, 
imund W T hitier, 
)hn Farnum, 
avid Knowls, 
>seph Glines, 
phraim Abbot, 
>seph Hoock, 
arnard C. Elliot, 
3ter Powell, 
)hn Blanchard, 
aac Runnells, 
jremiah N. How, 
>seph F. Dow, 
ire. Abbot, 
avid Clifford, 
niothy Shaw, 
3bert Moss, 



Sept. 26, 1814 



Sixty days 



Sept. 26, 1814 



Sixty days 



Pembroke. 

Loudon. 

Discharged 

Loudon. 

Discharged 

Pembroke. 

Loudon. 

Discharged 

Discharged 

Canterbury 

Discharged 

Discharged 

Concord. 

Loudon. 

Loudon. 

Discharged 

Discharged 

Discharged 

Northneld. 



Joined Sept. 
[29, 1814. 
Nov. 5, 1814. 

Nov. 5, 1814. 



Nov. 5, 1814. 
Nov. 5, 1814. 

Nov. 5, 1814. 
Nov. 5, 1814. 



Nov. 5, 1814. 
Nov. 5, 1814. 
Nov. 5, 1814. 



Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Discharged Nov. 

Never joined. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Never joined. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Discharged Nov. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Never joined. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Discharged Nov. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Concord. 

Loudon. 

Loudon. 

Loudon. 



5, 1814. 
5. 1814. 



5. 1814. 
5, 1814. 



5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 



5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 



5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 

5, 1814. 



5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 
5, 1814. 



158 adjutant-general's report. 

Koll of Capt. Fuller's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remark 


Abraham Clough, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Loudon. 


Jacob Bacheldor, 


" 


" 


Loudon. 


Daniel J. Smith, 




a 


Loudon. 


David Hill, 


<< 


" 


Loudon. 


David N. Piper, 


it 


" 


Loudon. 


Amos Chase, 


it 


" 


Loudon. 


John Gilman, 


it 


it 


Loudon. 


George B. Johnson, 




tt 


Loudon. 


John Sargent, jr., 




a 


Discharged Nov. 5. 1814 


Joshua Osborn, 




a 


Loudon. 


Thomas Wiggin, 




" 


Loudon. Sick in quart 


John Perkins, 




" 


Loudon. 


Jeremiah Davis, 




" 


Loudon. 


Samuel Carr, jr., 




" 


Xorthfield. 


Timothy Sargent, 




" 


Canterbury. 


David Kent, jr., 




it 


Canterbury. 


William Sherburn, 




11 


Loudon. 


James Orcliway, 




" 


Loudon. 


John Marden, 




it 


Xorthfield. 


William Arvin, 




" 


Canterbury. 


Nathan Tilton, 




tt 


Loudon. 


Richard S. Sargent, 




tt 


Loudon. 


Samuel Moore, 




tt 


Loudon. 


John Longee, 




\t 


Loudon. 


George Weels, 




it 


Loudon. 


Sami>son How, 




" 


Canterbury. 


Samuel Davis, 




" 


Canterbury. 


Joseph Clifford, 




tt 


Canterbury. 


Joshua Wliitcher, 




tt- 


Canterbury. 


Milton Giles, 




" 


Canterbury. 


Benjamin Morrill, 




" 


Xorthfield. 


Joseph Dalton, 




" 


Xorthfield. 


John Otis, 




(( 


Xorthfield. 


Joseph Taskar, 




it 


Concord. 


Jewett S. Long, 




tt 


Xever joined. 


William Hoit, jr., 




" 


Concord. 


Hazen Kimball, 




" 


Concord. 


Ephraim Pettengail, 




" 


Concord. 


Itufus Sleeper, 




tt 


Loudon. 


Jewett Sandborn, 




" 


Loudon. 


'Ebenezer Clough, 




tt 


Loudon. 


David Kinistone, jr., 




n 


Xorthfield. 


Ephraim Cross, 




" 


Xever joined. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 159 

Roll of Capt. Jonathan Godfrey's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



For what time 



Residence and Remarks. 



Jonathan Godfrey, Capt., 
Samuel Davidson, 1st Lieut 
John White, 2d " 

Eleck Brown, 3d <■ 

Daniel Goss, Ensign. 
Paul P. Downer, Sergeant. 
Osgood Cheever, " 

Samuel Peas, " 

John Sherburn, " 

James Sanborn, " 

Joseph B. Corliss, Corporal, 
Samuel Small, " 

John Eaton, " 

Richard Dow, " 

Caleb Davis, Fifer, 
John Fales, Drummer, 

PRIVATES. 

Ezra Allen, 
Benjamin Brown, 
Greenleaf Brackett, 
Samuel P. Cilley, 
Jonathan Bartlett, 
David Chapman, 
Samuel Cass, 
Samuel Goss, jr., 
Isaac S. Greene, 
John S. Haines, 
David Locke, jr., 
Daniel Locke, 
Ebenezer Barton, 
Moses Hanson, 
Robert Coleman, 
Amos Langley, 
John Rand, 
Webster Salter, 
John Sanders, 3d, 
Job Sanders, 
Reuben Sanborn, 
Levi Brown, jr., 
Perkins Philbric, 
Thomas Grant, 
Simon Philbric, 
Samuel D. Page, 
Samuel Haseltine, 
Charles Barton, 
Samuel Yeaton, 
Job Durgin, 
Jeremiah Stokes, 
Israel Durgin, 
David Rollins, jr., 
Levi York, 
John Pillsbury, 
Moses Keney, 
Jacob Eaton, 
Thomas Swett, 
Enoch Blake, jr., 
John Garland, 
Tappan Bond, 
Ebenezer McMurphy, 
David Campbell, 
Benjamin Ditson, 
Daniel M. Gault, 
James Stinson, 
Jonathan Jack, 
Sullivan Rowell, 
James Wilson, 
Barker Danford, 
James Platts, 
Emerson Colley, 



Sept. 29, 1814 
26 
2 
29 
29 
29 
26 
26 
29 
29 
26 
29 
29 
26 
29 
29 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Sixty days 



26 



Sixty 



Epsom. 

Windham. 

Londonderry. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. [10, 1814. 

Epsom. Discharged Nov. 

Londonderry. SickatPorts- 

Pelham. [mouth. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. Discharged Nov. 

Salem. [6, 1814. 

Northwood. Disch. Nov. 9, 

Pittsheld. [1814. 

Windham. Disch. Nov. 6, 

Chichester. [1814. 

Epsom. 



Disch. Nov. 6, 1814. 
Disch. Nov.10, 1814. 



Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. Disch. Nov.10, 1814. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. Disch. Nov.10, 1814. 

Epsom. 

Epsom. 

Epsom 

Epsom 

Epsom 

Northwood. 

Northwood. 

Northwood. 

Northwood. 

Northwood. 

Pittsheld. 

Pittsrield 

Pittsfield. 

Pittsfield. 

Pittsheld. 

Pittsheld. 

Londonderry. 

Londonderry. 

Windham. 

Pelhatn. 

Windham. Ab. since Nov.7, 

Londonderry, [with't leave. 

Londonderry. 

Londonderry. 

Londonderry. 

Londonderry. 

Londonderry. 

Londonderry. 



Dis. Nov. 10, 1814. 



Disch. Nov. 
[10, 1814. 



Disch. 



Nov. 5, 
[1814. 



160 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Godfrey's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Simeon Atwood, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Pelham. 


John Button, 




" 


Pelham. 


Amos Hadley, 




M 


Pelham. Bied Oct. 23, 1814. 


Abraham W. Stewart, 




U 


Salem. Bisch. Nov. 10, 1814. 


John Clark, jr., 




a 


Salem. 


Baniel Corliss, 




H 


Salem. 


Moses Sargent, 
Philip K. Wiles, 




a 


Windham. 




a 


Windham. Ab. since Nov.7, 


Rufus Patterson, 




a 


Windham, [without leave 


Stephen E. Blaisdell, 




a 


Windham. * 


Abner Henry, 




(t 


Londonderry. 


Baniel Shute, 




(( 


Londonderry. 


Ebenezer Stickney, 




(i 


Londonderry. 


Nathan Gage, 




n 


Pelham. 


Jonas Butrick, 




it 


Pelham. 


Ebenezer Caldwell, 




a 


Londonderry. 


John Leland, 




a 


Londonderry. 


Moody Nichols, 




a 


Londonderry. 


Samuel Nichols, 




a 


Londonderry. Disch. Nov 


Gilbert Bond, 




a 


Salem. [10, 1814 


Robert Whitaker, 




(i 


Salem. 


Joseph Kimball, 




« 


Salem. 


William Doty, 




a 


Salem. 


William M. Butler, 




it 


Salem. 


Timothy Bustin, 




" 


Salem. 


Stephen Rand, 




a 


Not .joined. 


Frederick Sanborn, 




a 


Not joined. 


Israel Brew, 




»< 


Not joined. 


Jacob Swett, 




" 


Not joined. 


John F. Stevens, 




« 


Not joined. 


Thomas Wilson, 




" 


Not joined. 



military history of new-hampshire. 161 

Pay Roll of Lieut. Asa Head's Company. 



Names. 


From when. 


To when. 


Residence. 


Asa Head, 2d Lieut., 


Sept. 26,1814 


Nov., 1814 


Pembroke. 


Sam. Whitehouse, Ensign, 


" 


Nov., 1814 


Pembroke. 


William Ham, Sergeant, 


" 


Nov. 11 


Pembroke. 


John Palmer, jr., " 


a 


<< 


Pembroke. 


William Knox, " 


tt 


<< 


Pembroke. 


Aaron Martin, Corporal, 


<( 


<< 


Pembroke. 


Peter Tucker, Musician, 


" 


«( 


Pembroke. 


Andrew Gault, " 


" 


tt 


Pembroke. 


* PRIVATES. 








Prescott Kendall, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Nov. 11,1814 


Pembroke. 


Seth Baker, 




" 


Pembroke. 


Levi Baker, 


« 


tt 


Pembroke. 


John Conner, 




<< 


Pembroke. 


Stephen Chickering, 




tt 


Pembroke. 


Jeremiah Edmunds, 




tt 


Pembroke. 


George French, 




«< 


Pembroke. 


Samuel Kelley, 




tt 


Pembroke. 


Joseph Knox, 




<< 


Pembroke. 


Nath. Lakeman, 




" 


Pembroke. 


Robert Moore, jr., 




«< 


Pembroke. 


John Morrison, 




(( 


Pembroke. 


Isaac Knox, 




«« 


Pembroke. 


John Nickson, jr., 




«< 


Pembroke. 


Charles Rowell, 




<< 


Pembroke. 


Samuel Robinson, 




(( 


Pembroke. 


Isaac C. Swan, 




(( 


Pembroke. 


Joseph Seavey, 




«< 


Pembroke. 


John Phillips, 




(( 


Pembroke. 


Edmund Whitcher, 




tt 


Pembroke. 


John Sargent, jr., 




12 


Pembroke. 


Tim. Lyndstone, Waiter, 




5 


Pembroke. 



11 



162 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Reuben Marsh's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Reuben Marsh, Captain, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Chesterfield. Joined Oct. 


Fenno Comins, Lieutenant, 


" 




Cornish. Disch'd Nov. 9, '1 


Mead Bradley, " 


« 




Chesterfield. 


Asa Hamilton, " 


" 




Chesterfield. 


Amasa Hall, Ensign, 


" 




Croydon. 


William Wheelock, Clerk 








and Sergeant, 


" 




Winchester. 


Aaron Smith, Sergeant, 


" 




Croydon. 


Samuel Stearns, " 


" 




Swansey. 


Daniel Jackson, " 


" 




Cornish. 


Daniel Hoyt, " 


" 




Newport. 


David Beer, " 


" 




Swansey. Never joined. 


Samuel Hews, Corporal, 


" 




Springfield. 


John More, 


<« 




Wendell. 


Richard Clap, " 


«< 




Goshen. 


John Gunnison, " 


a 




Goshen. 


Charles A. Saxton, " 


<« 




Claremont. 


Samuel Draper, Musician, 


« 




Chesterfield. 


Ellis Thayer, " 


<( 




Richmond. 


PRIVATES. 








Daniel Stearns, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Chesterfield. 


Laman Wheeler, 






Swansey. 


Joseph Snow, 






Swansey. 


Wm. Long, 






Swansey. 


Thomas Prime, 






Swansey. Disch'd Nov. 


Daniel Mathews, 






Swansey. 


Nathl. Foster, 






Swansey. 


David Thompson, 






Swansey. 


Daniel Osborn, 






Swansev. [3. 181 


Elijah Lyon, 






Chesterfield. Disch'd No 


John Bass, 






Chesterfield. 


Philip Bacon, 






Chesterfield. 


Lyman Toms, 






Chesterfield. 


Daniel Allen, jr., 






Hinsdale. 


Alvin Barrett, 






Hinsdale. 


Joseph Mellen, 






Winchester. 


Asahel Lyman, 






Winchester. 


EJly Lyman, 






Winchester. 


Henry' Whipple, 






Winchester. 


Edwin Gastin, 2d, 






Winchester. 


Henry Wise, 






Winchester. 


Nahum Perry, 






Richmond. Died Nov. 2, '1 


Ellis Thayer, 






Richmond. Disch'd Nov. 


Eli Page, 








Eli Page, jr., 








Jeremiah Bowles, 








Millen Barnes, 








Wm. Pickering, 








Aaron Martin, 








David Seavy, 








Oney Ballow, 








Barzilla Streeter, jr., 








Jona. Record, 








David Angel, 








Augustin Meachum, 








Nathl. Bartlett, 








Benj. Reed, jr., 








Benj. Reed, 








Benj. Edminister, 








Isaac Scott, 








Stekely Angel, 








Jona. Edwards, 








Hezekiah Silloway, 








Samuel Bracklebach, 








Thomas Bracklebach, 






Plainfield. 


Hayes Alexander, 






Plainfield. Disch'd Nov. 1 


Samuel Duncan, 






Springfield. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



163 



Roll of Capt. Marsh's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Asa Baker. 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Claremont. 


James McLoffing, 




" 


Claremont. 


James Fisher, 




" 


Claremont. 


Samuel Petty, 




" 


Claremont. [1814. 


Charles Cutten, 




u 


Croydon. Disch'd Nov. 9, 


John 0. Cutten, 




n 


Croydon. 


Ansel Metcalf, 




i. 


Croydon. 


"Wm. Lamb, 




" 


Wendell. 


Edward Crosby, 




" 


Wendell. 


Moses Eastman, 




" 


Croydon. 


Stephen Piles, 




«« 


Newport. 


Frederick Powers, 




<« 


Newport. 


Richard Lovering, 




f( 


Newport. 


Azotas Chamberlain, 




<« 


Newport. Disch'd Nov. 11. 


Amos Atwood, 




<t 


Newport. 


John Bryant, 




" 


Newport. 


Joseph Stevens, 




" 


Newport. 


Giles Shirtleff, 




n 


Newport. 


John Kelsy, 




K 


Newport. Disch'd Nov. 7. 


Benj. Gunnison, 




a 


Goshen. 


Vinal Gunnison, 




« 


Goshen. 


John Shales, 




" 


Goshen. [Nov. 9, 1814. 


Thomas Smith, 




(c 


New Grantham. Disch'd 


Jeremiah Crawd, 




" 


New Grantham. [Nov. 9. 


Henry Howard, jr., 




« 


New Grantham. Disch'd 


William Quimby, 




«c 


Springfield. 


Bobert Angel, 




" 


Claremont. 


Barnes Gilbert, 




(< 


Claremont. 


George W. Drown, 




it 


Plainfield. 


Jason Cole, 




(( 


Plainfield. 


Sandford Young, 




a 


Plainfield. Disch'd Nov. 8. 


James Stone, 




" 


Cornish. 


Weston Waite, 




<« 


New Grantham. 


Trueworthy Fowler, 




» 


New Grantham. 


James Hazard, 




" 


Springfield. 


Richard Morgan, 




<< 


Springfield. 


Jason Smith, 




" 


Springfield. 


Samuel Eastman, 




<( 


Springfield. 


George W. Fargo, 




it 


Springfield. 


Siblev Melady, 




" 


Springfield. 


Tristam Hoit, 




" 


Springfield. 


Thomas Bracklebach, 




" 


Springfield. 



164 



adjutant-general's report. 



Roll of Capt. 



Samuel Aiken, Jr.'s, Company. 



Names. When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Samuel Aiken, jr., Captain, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Chester. 


Joseph Hubbard, 1st Lieut., 


" 




Candia. 


John Davis, 2d Lieut., 


a 




Allenstown. 


Joseph F. Foster, Ensign, 


a 




Allenstown. 


Wm, Stanwood, Ensign, 


a 




Chester. [X. Yard, Oct. 


Jabez Crooker, Sgt.and Clk. 


a 




Chester. On adj. 's duty { 


William Turner, Sergeant, 


a 




Candia. 


Jonathan Morrill, " 


a 




Chester. 


Abel Read, " 


a 




Candia. 


Jeremiah Chandler, " 


a 




Raymond. [181 


William Aiken, " 


11 




Chester. Promoted Oct. 


Samuel Lane, Corporal, 


a 




Chester. 


Francis Folsom, 


" 




Raymond. . [181 


Benjamin Rowe, " 


a 




Candia. Reduced Oct. 


James Wilcomb, " 


tt 




Chester. 


Nathan S. Sweet, " 


<( 




Hampstead. Promoted Oc 


Nathan Brown, Musician, 


tt 




Raymond. [4, 181 


Richard Eaton, " 


" 




Candia. 


Gilman Lovering, " 


a 




Raymond. 


PRIVATES. 








Orlando Spofford, 


Sept. 26,1814 


Sixty days 


Chester. Never joined. 


John Hall, 


" 


" 


Chester. 


Benjamin Mills, 


" 


a 


Chester. 


William Greenough, 


" 


u 


Chester. 


John Davis, 


« 


a 


Chester. Never j oined. 


Ebenezer Wilcomb, 


" 


(( 


Chester. 


David Morrill, 


" 


«( 


Chester. 


David Murry, 


u 


" 


Chester. 


John Shirley, 


tt 


" 


Chester. 


John Butler, 


" 


(« 


Chester. Joined Oct. 5, 181 


Benjamin Preston, 


" 


n 


Chester. 


Daniel Ball, 


" 


a 


Chester. 


John Dolby, 


a 


" 


Chester. 


Robert Wiison, 


u 


11 


Chester. 


William Dearborn, 


<< 


" 


Chester. 


Jeremiah Rand, jr., 


a 


a 


Chester. 


L. H. Seavy, 


a 


a 


Chester. Never joined. 


Jonathan Norton, 
Theodore Jewett, 


n 


lt 


Chester. 


a 


<( 


Chester. 


Robert Mills, 


ti 


" 


Chester. 


Nathan Webster, 


« 


<< 


Chester. 


John Seavey, 


<< 


<< 


Chester. 


John Wilson, 


<( 


(< 


Chester. 


Henry West, 
David Leach, 


<< 


a 


Chester. 


" 


tt 


Chester. 


James Calp, 


<« 


<( 


Chester. [9, 181 


Israel Blake, 


et 


(( 


Chester. Discharged Noi 


Reuben Dinsmore, 


" 


n 


Chester. Joined Oct. 5, 181 


Stephen J. Worthen, jr., 


ti 


a 


Chester. 


Mead R. Underbill, 


it 


a 


Chester. Xever joined. 


John Chase, 


" 


it 


Chester. 


Mathew Dickey, 


" 


<( 


Chester. Joined Oct. 3, 181 


Jonathan Williams, 


" 


tt 


Chester. 


Samuel Thompson, 


<( 


tt 


Chester, [army, Oct. 11, '1 


John Hosden, 


c« 


" 


Chester. Enlisted in TJ. J 


Joseph Brown, 


" 


tt 


Chester. 


John A. Otterson, 


a 


a 


Chester. 


Joshua Martin, jr., 


(t 


a 


Chester. [181 


Josiah Turner, 


" 


a 


Candia. Joined Sept. 3( 


Daniel Taylor, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Gilman Richardson, 


" 


ct 


Candia. 


Isaiah Lane, 


a . 


a 


Candia. 


John Clark, 


it 


" 


Candia. 


Willis Patten, 


(i 


it 


Candia. 


Mose>- Patten, 


11 


" 


Candia. 


John Colby, 


" 


" 


Candia. 


Jeremiah Brown, 


« 


it 


Candia. 


Parker Hills. 


" 


a 


Candia. 


Benjamin Eaton, 


" 


" 


Candia. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 165 

Roll of Capt. Aiken's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Besidence and Remarks. 


Moses Stevens, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Candia. 


Sewall Brown, 


" 




Candia. Joined Oct. 1, 1814. 


John Moore, 


(< 




Candia. 


Moses Critchett, 


a 




Candia. 


Biley Smith, 


tt 




Candia. 


Sargeant French, 


a 




Candia. 


James Wilson, 


" 




Candia. 


Aaron Rowe, 


" 




Candia. 


William Eaton, 


tt 




Candia. [8, 1814. 


Jonathan Robey, 


tt 




Candia. Discharged Nov. 


Nathan Thorne, 


a 




Candia. 


Joseph Band, 


" 




Candia. 


Samuel Moody, 


" 




Raymond. 


David Clifford, 


" 




Raymond. 


David Gill, 


(( 




Raymond. Joined Oct. 3, '14. 


David Brown, jr., 


" 




Raymond. Joined Oct. 1, '14. 


Supply Morse, 


" 




Raymond. Joined Oct. 1, '14. 


Moses Healey, 


tt 




Raymond. 


Daniel Scribner, 


tt 




Raymond. 


James Dudley, jr., 


tt 




Raymond. 


Jonathan Holman, 


it 




Raymond. 


Isaiah Cram, 


" 




Raymond. 


Nathaniel Towle, 


it 




Raymond. 


David Bobie, 


tt 




Raymond. 


John Smith, 


(i 




Raymond. 


William Clark, 


ii 




Allenstown. 


Josiah Allen, 


<( 




Allenstown. 


Benjamin Bo we, 


tt 




Never joined. 


Andrew Buntin, 


tt 




Never joined. 


Jonathan Goss, 


» 




Allenstown. 


Samuel Lane, jr., 


it 




Chester. 


Joseph Knight, 


« 




Atkinson. 


Enoch Noyes, 


it 




Atkinson. 


Benjamin Dustin, 


" 




Hampstead. 


Stephen Dustin, 


« 




Atkinson. 


William Boach, 


tt 




Atkinson. 


Balph Brickett, 


a 




rlampstead. 


John Pettingill, 


it 




Atkinson. 


Jonathan Bond, jr., 


a 




lampstead. 


Asa Kimball, 


tt 


tt 


-T am] (stead. 


Ebenezer Little, 


tt 


" ] 


Hampstead. 


Leonard Wilson, 


" 




Atkinson. 


Stephen Jenkins, Waiter, 


" 


" ] 


Kittery. 


George W. Fargo, " 


" 


" ( 


Dlaremont. 


Jevi Webster, " 


M 


] 


vittery. 


Enoch Thwing, " 


" 


" ] 


Kittery. 



166 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. James T. Trivett's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


James T. Trivett, Captain, 


Sept. 27,1814 


Sixty days 


Mt. "Vernon. Joined Oct. 2, 


Robert Read, Lieut., 
Stephen Emerson, Lieut., 


" 


tt 


Amherst. [1814. 


" 




Weare. 


"Win. Webster, " 


" 


a 


Kingston. 


Herman Follansbee, Ensign 


« 


a 


Weare. 


Sam. B. Patterson, Clerk, 


*< 


<< 


joft'stown. 


Alvin Cross, Sergt., 


« 


a 


Litcli field. 


Wm, Beard, " 


" 


a 


Merrimack. 


John Gale, " 


a 




Weare. 


Leonard T. Nichols, Sergt. 


" 


a 


Amherst. 


Abner Gould, Corporal, 


K 


a 


Mont Vernon. 


Thomas Eastman, " 


it 


it 


Weare. 


Samuel Stevens, " 


It 




Amherst. 


Thomas Dunlap, " 


it 


a 


Manchester. 


Charles Boutell, Fifer, 


" 


tt 


Hancock. 


Noah Kidder, Drummer, 


" 




Gofistown. 


PRIVATES. 








James Annis, 


Sept. 27,1814 


Sixty days 


Amherst. Deserted Nov. 5, 


George Ally, 


" 


" 


Weare. [1814. 


John Ayers, 


« 


it 


Dunbarton. 


True Ayres, 


« 


11 


Frances town. 


Isaac Butterfield, 


»< 


tt 


Hollis. 


John Butterfield, 


<( 


" 


Hollis. Died Nov. 7, 1814. 


John Brooks 


" 


a 


Milton. 


Leonard Blood, 


<( 


a 


Hollis. 


Stephen Butterfield, 


t< 


ti 


Gofistown. 


Jona. C. Butterfield, 


a 


a 


Weare. 


Barton Bullock, 


" 


it 


Bedford. 


Samuel Brown, 


tt 


a 


Manchester. 


Eliphalet Baily, 


•< 


it 


Unity. 


Daniel Coggin, 


(< 


f 1 


Mont Vernon. 


Samuel Converse, jr., 


" 


it 


Amherst. 


"Wm. Clough, 


«» 


a 


Weare. 


Aaron Colby, 


(< 


tt 


Dunbarton. 


David Campbell, 


" 


" 


Francestown. 


John Carson, 


*< 


a 


New Boston. 


Daniel Colby, 


" 


a 


Gofistown. 


Luther Chase, 


" 


a 


Litchfield. Present, sick. 


Lovvel Cram, 


ti 


a 


Unity. 


John Duncklee, 


a 


it 


Mil ford. 


John Drew, 


tt 


it 


Hollis. 


Asa Dodge, 


ti 


" 


New Boston. 


John Dustin, 


tt 


" 


Francestown. 


Henry Ernes, 


tt 


" 


Nottingham. 


Daniel Emerson, 


a 


u 


Weare. 


Wm. Elliott, 


tt 


t( 


Dunbarton. 


Israel Farnham, 


it 


ti 


Amherst. 


"Wm. French, 


tt 


" 


Bedford. 


James H. Grator, 


tt 


it 


Amherst. 


George Glym, 


tt 


n 


Dunstable. 


Asa Goodhue, 


a 


ti 


Dunbarton. 


Abel Greene, 


it 


tt 


Brookline. 


Gershom Harvell, 


tt 


it 


Litchfield. Present, sick. 


Hezekiah Hamlet, 


a 


tt 


Dunstable. 


Nathan Hall, 


n 


a 


Milford. 


Henry Hutchinson, 


a 


ft 


Mil lord. 


Jeremiah Howe, 


it 


tt 


Milford. 


Leonard Harris, 


(t 


tt 


Dunstable. 


Timothy Hartshorn, 


tt 


tt 


Amherst. 


Charles Hoit, 


n 


it 


Gofistown. Disch'd Oct. 14, 


David Brown, 


tt 


it 


Francestown. 


Joel Heath, 


tt 


tt 


Henniker. 


Asa Hardy, 


tt 


ti 


Nottingham. 


Sam. Huntington, 


" 


it 


Francestown. 


Daniel T. Ingalls, 


" 


ti 


Merrimack. 


Peter Jones, 


ti 


a 


New Boston. 


Hezekiah Kendall, 


" 


a 


Hollis. 


Mansfield King, 


tt 


tt 


Amherst. 


Francis King, 


tt 


it 


Bedford. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 167 

Roll op Capt. Trivett's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Philip Kidder, 


Sept. 27, 1814 


Sixty days 


Goffstown. 


Daniel Kendall, 


" 




Mont Vernon. 


James Little, 


a 




Goffstown. 


Alex. Lynch, 


" 




Goffstown. 


William Morgan, 


" 




N. Boston. Disch'd Oct. 14. 


Hiram Nourse, 


<< 




Merrimack. 


Thomas Nichols, 


(< 




Weare. 


David Nichols, 


tt 




Dunbarton. 


Israel Putnam, 


<« 




Nottingham. 


David Powers, 


<< 




Hollis. Present, sick. 


Bernias Pritchard, 


« 




Bedford. 


Thomas King, 


ti 




Unity. 


Russell Robbins, 


a 




Dunstable. 


Gould Robbins, 


«< 




Dunstable. 


Luther Robbins, 


» 




Dunstable. 


Oliver Sprague, 


K 




Nottingham. 


Rufus Seavey, 


11 




Nottingham. 


William Sanders, 


(( 




Brookline. 


John Stearns, 


«« 




New Boston. 


Wm. Sweer, 


(( 




Dunbarton. 


David Smith, 


(> 




Francestown. Present, sick. 


Reuben Spatford, 


" 




Bedford. 


Archibald Stinson, 


« 




Weare. 


Daniel L. Stearns, 


" 




Mont Vernon. Sick in quar- 


Mathew Thornton, 


11 




Merriinack. [ters. 


Henry Tarbox, 


« 




Nottingham. Died Nov. 9. 


Jesse Tay, 


" 




Milton. 


John Turrill, 


« 




Goffstown. 


Ezra Tucker, 


<< 




Henniker. 


David Tucker, 


<( 




Henniker. 


Joseph Vichery, 


" 




Goffstown. 


Samuel R. Wood, 


11 




Merrimack. 


Moses Wood, 


a 




Weare. 


Brooks Worthley, 


u 




Goffstown. 



Note. — Lieut. Robert Read, whose name appears on the preceding page, was the 
son of William Read, of Amherst, and was born at Amherst in 1786. He was engaged 
in mercantile pursuits. He was Lieutenant of the 1st Company of Infantry in Am- 
herst in 1814, and had command of the same for some years subsequent. He was 
Clerk of the town for twelve years following 1815. He represented the town in 1826, 
1827, and 1828. In 1828, he was appointed Aid-de-camp by Gov. John Bell, upon his 
staff, with the rank of Colonel. In 1835, Col. Read moved to Nashua, having been 
appointed Agent of the Nashua Manufacturing Company. In 1837, he was appointed 
Agent of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, and removed to Manchester. He 
resigned that office January 1, 1852, and removed to Nashua, where he died. Col. 
Read was an upright, honest, energetic man. A large part of the operations of 
the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company were completed under his agency. 



168 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Silas Call's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Silas Call, Captain, 


Oct. 2, 1814 


Nov. 8, 1814 


Died Nov. 8, 1814. 


Stephen Sergant, Lieut. 




11 


New London. 


Daniel Foristall, " 




tc 


Fitzwilliam. 


Samuel Quimby, " 




cc 


Salisbury. 


Reuben Clough, Ensign, 




« 


Warner. 


Timothy Hoit, Sergeant, 




" 


Sa isbury. 


Marden Sevey, " 




" 


Warner. 


Nath. Morgan, " 




" 


Hopkinton. 


Samuel Flanders, " 




it 


Sutton. 


William Farrar, " 




" 


Fitzwilliam. 


Nath. Huntoon, Corporal, 




9 


Andover. Dis. Nov. 9, 1814 


Benj. Severance, " 




11 


Boscawen. 


Cyrus Watson, " 




13 


Enlisted in U. S. service 


Walter Eaton, " 




11 


Jatfrey. [Oct. 13, 1814. 


Thomas Chase, " 




it 


Salisbury. 


Amos Roaf, Musician, 




a 


Boscawen. 


A. B. Bohonon, " 




it 


Salisbury. 


Moses Perkins, " 




9 


New Marlboro'. Dis. Nov. 9. 


Christopher Sargent," 




19 


Warner. Tran. Wm. Grav's 


Stephen White, " 




11 


New Marlboro'. [Co. Oct. 19. 


PRIVATES. 








Jacob Chase, 


Oct. 2, 1814 


Nov. 11, 1814 


Hopkinton. 


Amos Fry, 




" 


Hopkinton. 


John Johnson, 




" 


Hopkinton. 


John Hastings, 




" 


Hopkinton. 


Alvin Hastings, 




" 


Hopkinton. 


Francis Stanly, 






Hopkinton. Died. 


James Eastman, 




11 


Hopkinton. 


Amos Sawyer, 




" 


Hopkinton. 


Ephraim Noyes, 






Discharged. 


James Noyes, 






Discharged. 


Joseph M. Stevens, 






Discharged. 


Nathan Tucker, 




11 


Salisbury. 


Jabez True, 




" 


Salisbury. Sick. 


Theodore George, 




<< 


Salisbury. 


Nath. Bartlett, 




" 


Andover. 


James Pushee, 




| 


Fitzwilliam. 


Samuel Straw, 




" 


Andover. 


Samuel Webster, 




" 


Salisbury. 


Samuel Messer, 




u 


New London. 


Israel Merrill. 




(I 


Fisherheld. 


Cummin Marshall, 




a 


Bradford. 


Jona. Morrill, 






Salisbury. Discharged. 


Chase Prescott, 




11 


Wilmot." 


James Morgan, 




" 


Sutton. 


Isaac Proctor, 




« 


Salisbury. 


Zenas Herrick, 




«« 


New London. 


Smith Roberts 






Discharged. 


Gilmore Fellows, 




11 


Andover. 


Ezekiel Knowles, 




« 


Andover. 


Francis Cilley, 




(< 


Andover. 


Jethro Barber, 




«' 


Wilmot. 


Levi Gates, 




« 


New Marlborough. 


Ezekiel White, 




11 


New Marlborough. 


Jona. Gove, 




u 


Hopkinton. 


Nath. Smith, 




« 


New London. 


Henry Coburn, 






Bradford. Discharged. 


Joseph Putney, 




11 


Sutton. 


Aaron Russell. 






Sutton. 


Hasen Presbury, 






Brad.ord. Discharged. 


John Kezar, 






Sutton. Discharged. 


Rufus Marshall, 




11 


Bradiord. 


Moses W. Alden, 






Roxbury. 


Joseph Fin eld 




k( 


Salisbury. 


John M. Williams, 




(( 


Sutton. 


Isaac While, 




lc 


Parkersfield. 


Daniel Goodnow, 




tt 


Roxbury. 


Levi Streeter, 




" 


Fitzwilliam. 


Joseph Adams, 1st, 




(C 


Salisbury. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 169 

Roll of Capt. Call's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Samuel Jackman, 


Oct. 2, 1814 


Nov. 11, 1814 


Boscawen. 


Eben'r Moody, 


" 


" 


Boscawen. 


Jesse Sweatt, 


tt 


a 


Boscawen. 


Samuel Graves, 


a 


a 


Fitzwilliam. 


Daniel Bean, 


" 


a 


Sutton. 


Barnard Baily, 


•' 


" 


Bradford. 


William M. Crillis, 




<( 


Hopkmton. 


William Hains, 


• ( 


" 


Boscawen. 


Abel B. Eastman, 


• ( 


n 


Boscawen. 


Guy C. Flanders, 


'• 


tt 


Boscawen. 


Eleazer Bur bank, 


*■ 


tt 


Boscawen. 


Samuel Watson, 


" 


t( 


Boscawen. 


Samuel Kirmeson, 


it 


tt 


Andover. 


Isaac Heath, 


a 


n 


Not joined. 


Simeon Bartlett, 


t( 


it 


Warner. 


Jacob Colby, 


" 


(< 


Warner. 


Jacob Currier, 


tt 


Oct. 20, 1814 


Deserted Oct. 20, 1814. 


John Burnham, 


11 


Nov. 11, 1814 


Hopkinton. 


Joseph Folson, 


a 




Discharged. 


John Eaton, 


tt 


11 


Fisherfield. 


Asia Smith, 


" 


" 


Wilmot. 


Charles Hodskins, 


tt 


" 


Rindge. 


John Rhode, 


" 


" 


Rindge. 


Harry Greene, 


tt 


tt 


Rindge. 


Calvin Hale, 


ii 


a 


Rindge. 


Elisha Drury, 


tt 


11 


Fitzwilliam. 


Richard Kimball, 


(i 


tt 


Fitzwilliam. 


William Baker, 


tt 


a 


Parkersheld. 


Josiah Robins, 


(i 


(i 


Parkersfield. 


Darius Williams,- 


<' 


it 


New Marlborough. 


Jonathan Marshall, 


a 


tt 


Detached, but not joined. 


Aaron Hodskins, 


t< 




New Marlborough. Disch'd. 


David Graves, 


« 


11 


Fitzwilliam. Sick. 


Aaron Keyes, 


tt 


" 


Rindge. 


Joseph Robey, 
John Garland, 


" 


" 


Sutton. 


« 


'< 


Andover. 


John Bennett, 


tt 


" 


Fitzwilliam. 


John Hall, 


" 


tt 


Warner. 


Samuel Morgan, 


« 


" 


Fisherfield. 


Francis Morrill, 


tt 


tt 


Sutton. 


Joseph Adams, 2d, " 


" 


Packersfield. 



170 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. William Gregg's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


William Gregg, Captain, 


Sept. 27, 1814 


Sixty days 


Antrim. Joined Oct. 3, 1814. 


John Jones, 1st Lieut., 


" 




Dublin. 


David Furbush, 2d " 


" 




Sharon. 


Samuel Merrill, 3d " 


it 




Hillsborough. 


Putnam Wilson, Ensign, 


<< 




Wilton. 


H. Emery, Clerk and Sergt. 


<< 




Temple. 


Peter Percy, Sergeant, 


<< 




Greenfield. 


Salmon Allen, " 


" 




Rindge. 


Seth P. Tyler, " / 


<( 




Wilton. 


Samuel McClure, " 


« 




Antrim. 


Peter Farnham, Corporal, 


" 




Francestown. 


Timothy Bullard, " 


" 




Dublin. 


Samuel Chickering, " 


" 




New Ipswich. 


Silas Wheeler, " 


" 




New Ipswich. 


John Beason, Musician, 


a 




Lyndeboro'. 


Christopher Sergant, " 


" 




Warner. Disc. Nov. 4, 1814. 


PEIVATES. 








Daniel Allen wood, 


Sept. 27, 1814 


Sixty days 


Hillsborough. 


Samuel Anderson, 






Deering. 


Daniel Adams, 






Jaffrey. Sick in quarters. 


Timothy B. Abbot, 






Wilton. 


Joel Baily, 






Windsor. 


Moody M. Barker, 






Antrim. 


James Bickford, 






Hillsborough. 


Dennis Bryant, 






Deering. 


Simeon Bass, 






Sharon. 


Joseph Chamberlin, 






Lyndeborough. 


Zeba Curtis, 






Antrim. 


James Carter, 






Hillsborough. 


Nathan Carter, 






Hillsborough. 


Jacob Chase, 






Deering. 


Asa Chamberlin, 






Lyndeborough. 


David Chaplin, 






Jaffrey. 


Francis Dunckley, 






Lyndeborough. 


Timothy Darling, 






Mason. Disc. Nov. 7, order 


David Emerson, 






Greenfield. [Brig.Gen.Com. 


Daniel Edes, 






Peterborough. 


James Eaton, 






Jaffrey. 


Benjamin N. Fisk, 






Wilton, [of Brig. Gen. Com. 


Ambrose L. Farnum, 






Wilton. Disc. Nov. 7, order 


Stephen Brown, 






Deering. [ofBrig.Gen.Com. 


Seth Gay, 






Deering. Disc. Nov. 7. order 


Boswell Greene, 






Dublin. [ofBrig.Gen.Com. 


Robert Goff, 






Jaffrey. Disc. Nov. 3, order 


Abner Gould, 






New Ipswich. 


John Gilchrist, 






Dublin. 


Mathias Heath, 






Henniker. 


Henry Holbrook, 






Dublin. 


William H. Heath, 






Deering. 


Thomas P. Haywood, 






Antrim. 


Cyrus Hutchinson, 






Hillsborough. 


Abijah Hadley, 






Hancock. 


Elisha Huntley, 






Hillsborough. 


Zebulon Jefts, 






Mason. 


Nathan Johnson, 






Rindge. 


Edward Kimball, 






Henniker. 


Nathaniel H. Lakin, 






Francestown. 


Thomas Murdough, 






Deering. 


Asa Merriam, 






Mason. 


Russel Nay, 






Peterborough. 


Moses Pierce, 






Jaffrey. 


Jacob Percy, 






Greenfield. 


George Page, 






Deering. 


Moses Person. 






Lyndeborough. 


David A. Hatch, 






Peterborough. 


Joshua Parker, 






Temple. 


Josiah Patten, 






Temple. 


John Putnam, 






Dublin. 


Philip Peak, 






Jaffrey. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 171 

Roll of Capt. Gregg's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Ebenezer Russell, 
David Robbins, 


Sept. 27, 1814 


Sixty days 


Xvyndeborough. 
New Ipswich, 


Isaiah Robbins, 


" 




Mason. 


Caleb Rollins, 


<( 




Hillsborough. 


Amasa Reed, 


ft 




Hancock. 


Stephen Richardson, 


ii 




Hillsborough. 


Nathaniel Reynolds, 


it 




Green field. 


Thomas Roof, 


(< 




Deering. 


William Richardson, 


" 




Lyndeborough. 


John Savage, 


ft 




Greenfield. 


James Straw, 


" 




Hillsborough. 


Benjamin Stone, 


<« 




Hancock. 


Elijah Severance, 


a 




Antrim. 


John Sargent, 


it 




Lyndeborough. 


Abijah Severance, 


it 




New Ipswich. 


Shebual Shattuck, 


" 




Mason. 


Jonathan Spaulding, 


tt 




Temple. 


Joel Severance, 


" 




Wilton. 


Asa Stearns, 


11 




Antrim. 


David Sawtelle, 


" 




Jaffrey. 


Joseph Washburn, 


" 




Peterborough. 


Watson Washburn, 


" 




Hancock. [Brig. Gen. Com. 


Nathan Waitt, 


a 




Peterboro'. Disc.Nov.7,ord. 


Peter Wilder, 


ti 




New Ipswich. 


Eli Washburn, 


a 




Dublin. 


Ephraim Whitcomb, 


a 




Rindge. 


Joseph P. Welch, 
Asa Washburn, 


a 




Henniker. 


it 




Hancock. 


Nathan Upton, 


n 




Peterborough. 


Asa Fletcher, 


11 




Wilton. 


Joses Buckman, 


ti 




Mason. 


Ira Spofford, 


«< 




Sharon. 


Nathan Severance, 


a 




New Ipswich. 


Eliab Tapley, 


" 




Wilton. 


Sawin Yearly, 


a 




Dublin. 


Samuel L. Keep, 


" 




N.Ipswich. [Brig.Gen.Com. 


Larkin Mason, 


a 




Temple. Disc. Oct. 26, order 



172 

Field and Staff Roll of the Third Regiment of De- 
tached Militia. 
Edward Sise,* Lieut. -Colonel Commandant. 
Thomas Pickering, 1st Major. 
Levi Jones, 2d Major. 
Samuel Sheldon, Adjutant. 
William Dodge, Quartermaster. 
Jonathan Wingate, Paymaster. 
William Cutter, Surgeon. 
Josiah Richards, Surgeon's Mate. 
Moses Abbott, Sergeant-Major. 
Isaac Allen, Quartermaster's Sergeant. 
Thomas F. Edgerly, Chief Musician. 



* Colonel Sise was from Dover. He was born in Castle Lyons, County Cork, Ireland, 
January 11, 1762. He received a good education in the schools of Cork, and, soon 
after arriving at his majority, he emigrated to the United States, taking up his 
residence in Portsmouth, in 1784. He resided in Portsmouth but a short time, soon de- 
ciding to make Dover his abiding-place. Here he resided until his death. He en- 
gaged in mercantile pursits, and made several voyages to the "West Indies, as part 
owner and supercargo, and on his last voyage his vessel was captured by the French: 
the vessel and cargo were condemned, and proved an entire loss to the owners. Colonel 
Sise had received, in part, a military education in Ireland, and in this country took an 
active part in military affairs. His correspondence with General Sullivan, and other 
military men of that day, was extensive. He was commissioned Major of the 1st Bat- 
talion, 2d Regiment, of N. H. Militia in June, 1811, and Lieutenant-Colonel Command- 
ant of the same in June, 1814. In September following, Governor Gilman informed him 
in a private note that he had selected him to command one of the regiments to be 
formed from the detachments ordered from twenty-three regiments of the State Mili- 
tia, for the defense of Portsmouth; and, in due time, his commission as Lieutenant- 
Colonel Commandant of the 3d Regiment, thus organized, was forwarded to him. The 
orders of Governor Gilman, for the several detachments to march to Portsmouth forth- 
with, were received by express at Dover on Sunday. Colonel Sise was in church ; 
the sexton walked up the aisle and delivered the letter, and the Colonel quietly left 
the church. The news of the letter soon circulated; all was excitement and bustle, 
as many of the various congregations were of the detached soldiery. There was no 
more preaching in Dover on that Sabbath. Expresses were sent out even " beyond 
Sandwich," as says a private note; and the 1st Battalion of the 2d Regiment was in 
Dover on Wednesday following, on its march for Portsmouth. 

At Portsmouth, Colonel Sise proved a valuable and efficient officer. He died at 
Dover, July 26, 1842, in the 81st year of his age. 



military history of new-hampshire. 173 

Roll of Capt. William Courson's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


William Courson, Captain, 


Sept. 23, 1814 


Sixty days 


Milton. 




Josiah Magown, Lieut., 


23 


" 


Lebanon. 




Thomas Plumer, " 


23 


" 


Farmington. 




JohnMeserve, " 


23 


K 


Milton. 




Abr'm Parsons, jr., Ensign, 


29 


K 


Gilmanton. 




Calvin P. Fairfield, Serg't, 


26 


it 


Lyme. 




Aniasa Blodgett, " 


28 


(( 


Lebanon. 




John Cook, " 


Oct. 1 


« 


Sandwich. 




Chester Tenney, " 


Sept. 28 


'•' 


Hanover. 




John Johnson, " 


Oct. 1 


" 


Sandwich. Disch'd Nov. 


1G. 


Dudley C. Folsom, Corp., 


1 


« 


Gilmanton. 




"Wallace Amsden, " 


Sept. 2G 


" 


Lyme. 




Jona. Conant, " 


26 


" 


Lyme. 




Alba Hall, ' " 


28 


" 


Hanover. 




John Ross, Musician, 


30 


a 


Gilmanton. 




PRIVATES. 










Thomas Leavitt, 


Oct. 1, 1814 


Sixty days 


Moultonborough. 




Levi Annis, 


Sept. 26 


" 


Lyme. 




John Boyce, 


Oct. 1 


" 


Milton. 




Calvin Beal, 


Sept. 26 


<• 


Lyme. 




Samuel Bradshaw, 


28 


a 


Hanover. 




Isaac Balch, jr., 


26 


" 


Lyme. 




John Bickford, 


Oct. 1 


" 


Benton. 




Stephen Richards, 


1 


a 


Tamworth. 




Levi Bean, 


1 


a 


Sandwich. 




Henry B. Hatch, 


1 


a 


Tamworth. 




William Burley, 


1 


(l 


Sandwich. 




James Bean, 3d, 


1 


" 


Sandwich. 




Eben'r Blake, 


1 


a 


Sandwich. 




Charles Brown, 


Sept. 28 


a 


Hanover. 




James Chapman, 


28 


" 


Hanover. 




William Clifford, 


28 


" 


Lebanon. 




Latham Conant, 


26 


a 


Lyme. 




Jeremiah Clifford, 


30 


" 


Gilmanton. Disch.Nov. 


16 


Hezekiah Cook, 


Oct. 1 


" 


Tamworth. 




Edmund Crockett, 


1 


" 


Tamworth. 




Benj. Crafts, 


1 


" 


Moultonborough. 




John Cook, jr., 


1 


a 


Sandwich. 




Dennis Downing, 


1 


11 


Farmington. 




Samuel Dimick, 


Sept. 26 


" 


Lyme. 




George Downs, 


Oct. 1 


" 


Sandwich. 




Horace Eaton, 


Sept. 28 


" 


Hanover. 




Porter Fobes, 


26 


« 


Lyme. 




Elijah I landers, 


28 


u 


Hanover. 




David Fifleld, 


30 


«« 


Gilmanton. 




Oren Fogg. 


Oct. 1 


" 


Sandwich. 




Archibald Fisher, 


Sept. 26 


" 


Lebanon. 




John Cunnison, 


30 


et 


Gilmanton. 




Josiah Gilman, 


30 


a 


Gilmanton. 




Samuel Boyce, 


30 


a 


Guilford . 




Benj. Gardner, 


Oct. 1 


a 


Tamworth. 




Ephraim Graves, 


1 


a 


Centre Harbor. 




David Gilman, 3d, 


1 


a 


Tamworth. 




Lathrop Hamilton, 


Sept. 25 


a 


Lebanon. 




Sherburne Hutchinson, 


27 


it 


Lebanon. 




Samuel Hovey, 


26 


« 


Lyme. 




Daniel Harvey, 


26 


n 


Lyme. 




Zaran Haven, 


28 


a 


Lebanon. 




David Hatch, 


Oct. 1 


(' 


Gilmanton. 




John Hartford, 


1 


" 


Moultonborough. 




Moses Huchins, 


1 


a 


Moultonborough. 




Stephen Hodgdon, 
Levi Hawkins, 


1 
2 


a 


Moultonborough. 
Centre Harbor. 




Samuel Holmes, 


2 


t( 


Tamworth . 




David Johnson, 


2 


<( 


Centre Harbor. 




George Low, 


1 


« 


Tamworth. 




Josiah Ladd, 


1 


ti 


Sandwich. 




Wm. Lothrop, 


Sept. 23 


a 


Lebanon. 




Isaac Morrow 


Oct. 1 


" 


Gilmanton. 





174 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Courson's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence. 


John Mclntire, 


Oct. 1, 1814 


Sixty days 


Moultonborough. 


Aaron M. Walton, 


1 


" 


Sandwich. 


Isaiah Peavey, 


1 


ft 


Farmington. 


Beard Plummer, 


Sept. 29 


it 


Milton. 


Dodivah Palmer, 


29 


u 


Milton. 


Elisha Paine, 


25 


" 


Lebanon. 


Moses PI umer, 


28 


" 


Hanover. 


Dan Parker, 


28 


" 


Hanover. 


Amos Quimby, 


25 


a 


Sandwich. 


Enoch Rowel, 


30 


M 


Guilford. 


William Redington, 


28 


it 


Lebanon. 


Silas Stevens, 


28 


(( 


Hanover. 


Moses Sevey, 


28 


it 


Lebanon. 


Reuben Simmons, 


26 


it 


Lyme. 


Benj. Elliott, 


Oct. 1 


it 


Sandwich. 


Daniel Sanborn, 


1 


it 


Tamworth. 


Stephen Smith, 


1 


tt 


Tamworth. 


Josiah Thrasher, 


1 


" 


Sandwich. 


Joseph Thompson, 


1 


(( 


Farmington. 


Jared Talman, 


Sept. 26 


tt 


Lyme. 


Silas Tenny, 


27 


" 


Hanover. 


Chandler Metcalf, 


29 


« 


Hanover. 


Seth Tenny, 


27 


'• 


Hanover. 


Samuel Savage, 


Oct. 1 


it 


Tamworth. 


James Trowbridge, 


Sept. 28 


tt 


Hanover. 


Lambert W. Cushing, 


28 


it 


Lebanon. 


Thomas W. Grant, 


26 


it 


Lyme. 


John Wright, 


28 


" 


Lebanon. 


David Woodman, 


Oct. 1 


a 


Tamworth. 


John Wallace, 


1 


" 


Moultonborough. 


Avers Worth, 


2 


(( 


Centre Harbor. 


Jedediah Watson, 


1 


(( 


Sandwich. 


Samuel Smith, 


1 


" 


Sandwich. 


William Morrill, 


1 


a 


Moultonborough. 


John Washburn, 


Sept. 26 


" 


Lyme. 


Samuel Drown, Servant, 


23 


it 


Portsmouth. 


Hall Varrill, " 


23 


" 


Portsmouth. 


Wm. McKennon, li 


29 


it 


Portsmouth. 


Lewis Morey, Private, 


28 


tt 


Hanover. 


Moses Abbott, 


28 


tt 


Lebanon. 


Isaac Allen, 


28 


ti 


Hanover. 



military history of new-hampshire. 175 

Eoll of Capt. Jacob Dearborn's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



For what time 



Residence and Remarks. 



Jacob Dearborn, Captain, 
James Berleigh, 1st Lieut. 
Levi Berry. 2d kt 

Ephraim F. Rollins, 3d Lt., 
•William Pearson, Ensign, 
Joseph Fabyan, Sergeant, 
Benning Leavitt, " 
Isaac Kendall, " 

John D. Shacford, " 
Jonathan Marston, 3d. Sgt 
John Towle, Corporal, 
Phineas Lang, " 
David Marston, " 
Benj. Brown, " 
Daniel Drew, Musician, 
J. T. Marston, Prin. Mus'n 

PBIVATES. 

Jonathan Philbric, 
James Johnson, 
David Philbric, 
Thomas Leavitt, jr., 
Jonathan Redmond, jr., 
John Lamphrey, jr., 
James Godfrey, 
James Nudd, 
Joseph Palmer, jr., 
Nath. Cotton, 
Nathan Godfrey, 
John M. Blake, 
Thomas Robey, 
Jonathan Batcheldor, 
John B. Meed, 
David Blake, 
Samuel Barker, 
Daniel N. Moulton, 
Daniel Sandborn, 
John Brown, 3d, 
James H. Hale, 
Albert Carlton, 
Jonathan Johnson, 
David Goodwin, 
James Pearson, 
Thomas Graves, 
Joseph R. Doe, 
Samuel Stacey, 
Zebulon Kenison, 
Aaron Kenison, 
Nathan Presten, 
Charles Perry, 
Stephen Thing, 
Rufus Magoon, 
Wadleigh Davis, 
Enoch Worthin, 
Jesse Swain, 
Edward Rowe, 
James Thomson, 
Joshua Purington, jr., 
Edward Lee, 
Reuben Prescott, 
John Harvey, 
James Glidden, 
John Elkin, 
Jonathan Ealy, 
John Walton, 
Jesse Smith, 
Samuel Marsh, 
Jesse Prescott, 
John Groos, 
Ira Paul, 



Sept. 26, 1814 



Sixty days 



Oct. 5 
Sept. 26 



Sept. 26, 1814 



Sixty days 



Hampton. 

Newmarket 

Greenland. 

Newington. 

Exeter. 

Newington. 

N. Hampton. 

Exeter. 

Newmarket. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Greenland. 

Hampton. 

Seabrook. 

T ufton borough. 

Hampton. 



Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

H ampton. 

Sick in the country. 

Hampton. 

Hampton. 

N. Hampton. 

N. Hampton. 

N. Hampton. 

Sick in the country. 

Hampton. 

N. Hampton. 

N. Hampton. 

N. Hampton. 

Exeter. 

Exeter. 

Exeter. 

Exeter. 

Newmarket. 

Newmarket. 

Newmarket. 

Newmarket. 

Newmarket. 

Newmarket. 

Newmarket. 

Not joined. 

Brentwood. 

Brentwood. 

Brentwood. 

Brentwood. 

Brentwood. 

Brentwood. 

Epping. 

Epping. 

Not joined. 

Epping. 

Epping. 

Epping. 

Epping. 

Epping. 

Poplin. 

Poplin. 

Not joined. 

Poplin. 

Poplin. 

Newington. 



[tant. 
Acting Adju- 



176 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Dearborn's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence. 


Samuel Furber, jr., 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Newington. 


Nath. Adams, 




a 


Newington. 


Joseph Coleman, 




" 


Newington. 


Ephraim Ham, 




" 


Newington. 


Hapley Peavy, 




" 


Newington. 


George Adams, .jr., 




it 


Newington. 


Wm. C. Hodgdon, 




a 


Newington. 


Win. Furber, 




a 


Newington. 


Noah Hutchings, 




" 


Newington. 


Oliver Dennet, 




" 


Newington. 


Otis B. Downing, 




" 


Newington. 


Titus Ham, 




a 


Newington. 


Nicholas Otis, 




" 


Newington. 


John Greene, 




a 


Greenland. 


Wm. Cate, 




(i 


Greenland. 


David Johnson, 






Greenland. 


James Johnson, 




•• 


Greenland. 


Charles Clark, 




»• 


Greenland. 


John Quint, 




it 


Greenland. 


John Melpon, 




n 


Greenland. 


Moses Gate, 




a 


Greenland. 


John Tracey, 




a 


Greenland. 


John Nutter, 




<< 


Greenland. 


Daniel Pever, 




it 


Seabrook. 


Simeon Leavitt, jr., 




tt 


N. Hampton. 


John Fogg, jr., 




a 


N. Hampton. 


Jeremiah Marston, 




a 


N. Hampton. 


Adelpha Ricker, 




" 


Newington. 


John Gilman, 




" 


Greenland. 


Daniel Eaton, 




<( 


Seabrook. 


Henry Eaton, 




" 


Seabrook. 


Samuel Rowe, 




«' 


Seabrook. 


Walter Little, 




k 


Exeter. 


Thomas Fowler, 




< t 


Seabrook. 


Simeon Lain, Waiter, 




" 


Hampton. 


Thomas Foye, " 




<« 


Portsmouth. 


John Foye, " 




" 


Portsmouth. 



MILITARY HISTOEY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 177 

Roll of Capt. John D. Harty's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


John D. Harty, Captain, 


Sept 


13, 1814 


Sixty days 


Dover. 


Perkins Fellors, 1st Lieut., 




26 




Piermont. 


Wentworth Downs, 2d " 




20 




Wentworth. 


Ralph Twombly, 3d " 
Joseph Blake, Ensign, 




26 




Dover. 




27 




Canaan. 


John Caverly, 1st Sergt., 


Oct. 


3 




Barrington. 


Win. Aiken, 2d " 


Sept 


27 




Wentworth. 


Wm. W. Baily, 3d " 




27 




Haverhill. 


Dan'l Eastman, 4th " 




29 




Enfield. 


Johial Clark, 5th " 




29 




Canaan. 


Dan'l Pillsbury, 1st Corp., 




27 




Warner. 


Joseph Irwin, 2d " 




a 




Piermont. 


Obad. Whittaker, 3d " 




(i 




Warner. 


Benj. Hanson, 4th " 




28 




Rochester. 


Wm. Little, Fifer, 


Oct. 


1 




Barnstead. Deserted Nov 


Nath'l Haniford, Fifer, 


Sept 


27 




Enfield. [18, 1814. 


Phineas Hoit, Drummer, 




29 




Rochester. 


PRIVATES. 










John Aiken, 


Sept 


27, 1814 


Sixty days 


Wentworth. 


Jacob Alls, 




27 


" 


Haverhill. 


Stephen Adams, 




28 


it 


Enfield. 


Benj. Arlin, 


Oct. 


3 


" 


Barrington. 


Nath'l Barker, 


Sept 


28 


*t 


Canaan. 


James Blaisdell, 




28 


ft 


Canaan. 


Joseph Boody, 




27 


a 


Barrington. 


Levi Barnard, 




28 


a 


Enfield. 


John Copp, 




27 


tt 


Warren. 


Miram Curtis, 




m 


a 


Piermont. 


John Crook, 




it 


<t 


Piermont. 


Ichabod Cook, 




<( 


tt 


Wakefield. 


Josiah Clough, 




30 


n 


Gilmanton. 


Samuel Cate, 




29 


(i 


Brookfield. 


Isaac Caswell, 




29 


tt 


Barnstead. 


Nathan Currier, 




27 


tt 


Enfield. 


Jacob Colomy, 




29 


tt 


New Durham. 


Daniel Dudley, 




" 


tt 


Alton. 


Levi Douglas, 




it 


tt 


Brookfield. 


James Dow, 




tt 


it 


Enfield. 


Samuel Downing, 




a 


it 


Summersworth. 


James Dustin, 




tt 


tt 


Canaan. 


Joseph Dustin, 




tt 


tt 


Canaan. 


Hiram Davis, 




27 


it 


Piermont. 


John Irwin, 




tt 


it 


Piermont. 


John Eastman, 




tt 


it 


Enfield. 


Jona. P^astman, 




It 


ft 


Enfield. 


Ashbel Farnsworth, 




it 


tt 


Piermont. 


John Fifield, 




tt 


tt 


Coventry. 


Jacob Fellors, 




" 


it 


Piermont. 


Moses Gage, 




(( 


tt 


Orford. 


Aaron Gage, 
Timothy Goodwin, 




it 


" 


Orford. 




it 


tt 


Haverhill. 


Stephen Giles, 




it 


tt 


Brookfield. 


Wm. Gordern, 




30 


ft 


Gilford. 


Jason C. Hogdins, 




27 


tl 


Piermont. 


Stephen D. Hutchins, 




29 


it 


Wakefield. 


Daniel Heath, 




" 


tt 


Enfield. 


Samuel Jones, 




" 


tt 


Alton. 


William Jones, 




27 


it 


Haverhill. 


Joseph Jones, 


Oct. 


3 


tt 


Barrington. 


John Jones, 




3 


«c 


Barrington. 


Enoch Knowlton, 


Sept. 


27 


(( 


Wentworth. 


Oliver Knowel, 




29 


a 


Somersworth. 


Jona. Levit, 




30 


a 


Gilford. 


Timothy Langley, 




29 


tt 


New Durham. 


David Lary, 




29 


it 


Canaan. 


Ira Mann, 




27 


tt 


Orford. 


Joseph Mayson, 






it 


Orford. 


Benj. Mayson, 




<( 


a 


Orford. 



12 



178 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Harty's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. ;For what time. Residence and Remarks. 

1 


Nathan Mundy, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Barn stead. 


Win. Morse, 


29 


" 


Enfield. 


Joseph Moody, 


30 


" 


Grafton. 


Nath'l Niles, 


27 


" 


Orford. 


Wm. !Nute, 


27 


" 


Dover. 


Eben'r Nealy, 


29 


" 


Grafton. 


Asa Page, 


27 


a 


Orford. 


Seth Past, 


'< 


a 


Orford. Sick in hospital. 


Joseph Pratt, 


a 


" 


Haverhill. 


James Pebles, 


a 


a 


Piermont. 


David Page, 


26 


u 


Wakefield. 


Samuel Pickering, 


26 


a 


Barnstead. 


Samuel Pettingill, 


29 


a 


Enfield. 


Jacob Powers, 


23 


tt 


Enfield. 


Samuel Perkins, 


29 


" 


Alton. Sick in hospital. 


Daniel Perkins, 


27 


a 


Haverhill. 


John Perey, 


Oct. 3 


il 


Barrington. 


David Richards, 


Sept. 29 


a 


Middle ton. 


John Remick, 


Oct. 1 


(i 


Dover. 


Amos Richardson, 


Sept. 29 


a 


Canaan. 


Levi Stafford, 


27 


«( 


Haverhill. 


Chas. J. Swan, 


« 


a 


Haverhill. 


Wm. Stevens, 


" 


n 


Haverhill. 


Nath'l Small, 


30 


" 


Gilmanton. 


Joseph Sliory, 


28 


" 


Dover. 


Thomas Stevens, 


29 


a 


Alton. 


David Stockbridge, 


29 


it 


Alton. 


George Stevens, 


28 


" 


Enfield. 


Samuel Spinny, 


Oct. 4 


et 


Rochester. 


Elijah Tuttle, 


Sept. 28 


tt 


Dover. 


Samuel Tebbetts, 


29 


a 


Brookfield. 


Benj. Wilkinson, 


30 


a 


Gilford. 


Stephen Whiteman, 


27 


tt 


Warren. 


Jonathan West, 


30 


11 


Gilmanton. 


George L. Whitehouse, 


29 


a 


Middleton. 


Washington Wilson, 


" 


" 


Canaan. 


Jonathan Willard, 


<« 


n 


Wakefield. 


Rufus Wilson, 


27 


«. 


Canaan. 


Thomas Watson, 


27 


(( 


Orford. 


Daniel York, 


29 


a 


Alton. 


tXlyses Young, 


27 


a 


Haverhill. 


John Chaise, Servant, 


Oct. 11 


53 days 


Rye. 


Samuel Chaise, " 


" 


" 


Rye. 


Alfred Twombly" 


a 


a 


Madbury. 


Freeman G. Bowen, 


Sept. 27 


Sixty days 


Haverhill. 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



179 



Roll op Capt. John Bassett, Jr. 


's, Company. 


Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence. 


John Bassett, jr., Captain, 


Sept. 27, 1814 


Sixty days 


Atkinson. 


Roger Sargent, 1st Lieut., 
Epbraim French, 2d " 


29 




Bath. 


29 




Sandown. 


David Harriman, 3d " 


28 




Plaistow. 


Caleb Page, Ensign, 


26 




Hawke. 


Josiah French, Sergeant, 


26 




Atkinson. 


Daniel Williams, " 


26 




Hampstead. 


Samuel Flanders, " 


26 




Sandown. 


Amos Canney, " 


27 




Hawke. 


Simeon Eastman, " 


30 




New Concord. 


Benj. Carleton, Corporal, 


26 




Sandown. 


Job Stevens, " 


27 




Plaistow. 


William Lydston, " 


26 




Atkinson. 


George Bartlett, " 


26 




Kingston. 


Jacob Eastman, Musician, 


28 




Sewtown. 


Sebastian Spofford, " 


27 




Hawke. 


PRIVATES. 


- 






John Butler, 


Sept. 26,1814 


Sixty days 


Sandown. 


Joseph Bussell, 


27 




Sawke. 


Jeremiah Bean, 


27 


<< 


Hawke. 


David Bachelder, 


27 




Hawke. 


Stillman Bachelder, 


30 




Bethlehem. 


Hanover Brackett, 


28 




STewtown. 


Thomas Bacon, 


30 




Bath. 


Stephen Baily, 


30 




Bath. 


Benj. Baily, 


30 




Lyman. 


Francis Cornell, 


26 




Hampstead. 


Josiah C. Clark, 


30 




3ath. 


Bussell Clark, 


26 


(< 


Hampstead. 


Thomas Carter, 


26 




[vingston. 


Samuel Caverly, 


26 




Hawke. 


George Currier, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


John Currier, 


27 




Plaistow. 


William Carr, 


28 




STewtown. 


Isaac Carleton, 


30 


(< 


Bath. 


David Carleton, 


27 




Plaistow. 


John Carleton, 


27 




Plaistow. 


Aaron Cooly, 


30 




STew Concord. 


William Copp, 


30 




Littleton. 


Jesse Davis, jr., 


26 




Hampstead. 


Thomas Davis, 


26 




[vingston. 


John Dodge, 


30 




Lyman. 


John Emerson, 


26 




Sandown. 


Eben. Eaton, 


30 




Landaft'. 


Levi Fuller, 


26 




Sandown. 


Wm. Foote, 


28 


<< 


Newtown. 


Lowell Foote, 


26 


(< 


Kingston. 


Cyrus Fith, 


26 


<< 


Sandown. 


Chellis Fith, 


26 


" 


E. Kingston. 


Joseph Fith, 


28 


" 


Newtown. 


Thomas Flanders, 


27 


" 


Plaistow. 


Levi Francis, 


26 


(t 


Sandown. 


Richard Griffin, 


26 


a 


Sandown. 


Thomas Gould, 


28 


" 


Newtown. 


Daniel Goodwin, 


28 


" 


Newtown. 


James Goodale, 


26 


« 


Atkinson. 


Jona. Glinds, 


30 


" 


Bath. 


David Hadley, 


26 


" 


Hampstead. 


James Hadley, 


26 


" 


Hampstead. 


Eliphalet Hoyt, 


26 


" 


Hampstead. 


Joseph Hoyt, 


26 


" 


Hampstead. 


Moses Hughes, 


28 


M 


Newtown. 


John Hughes, 


26 


" 


Kingston. 


William Hand, 


28 


it 


Newtown. 


Nathan Hartford, 


26 


" 


Kingston. 


Peter Haddock, 


30 


'" 


Lyman. 


Enoch Hoyt, 


26 


" 


Newtown. 


Israel Ingalls, 


28 


" 


Newtown. 


Amos Judkins, jr., 


28 


" 


Kingston. 



180 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL 7 S REPORT. 



Eoll of Capt. John Bassett, Jr.'s, Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Jonas Johnson, 


Sept. 26,1814 


Sixty days 


E. Kingston. 


Amos Judkins, 


26 


" 


E. Kingston. 


Anthony Kelly, 


26 




Plaistow. 


Moses Knight, 


30 




Landaff. 


John Knight, 
"William Kenney, 


26 




Atkinson. 


30 




Bethlehem. 


Alpheus Kenney, 


30 




Bethlehem. 


James Keeser, 


27 




Hawke. 


William Moody, 


26 




Kingston. 


Moses C. Magoon, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


John W. Millin, 


30 




Littleton. 


Isaac Morse, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


Oliver Morse, 


30 




Littleton. 


Henry Noyes, 


26 




Atkinson. 


Peter Neal, 


26 




Sandown. 


Samuel Plummer, 


27 




Hawke. 


David Parsley, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


Elisha Palmer, 


30 




New Concord. 


Stephen Peck, 


30 




Littleton. 


Moses Plummer, 


26 




Sandown. 


Nathan Quimby, 


26 




Hampstead. 


Philip Robbins, 


26 




New Concord. 


John Sweat, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


John Sanborn, 


26 




Sandown. 


Moses Short, 


28 




Newtown. 


Isaac Sargent, 


27 




Plaistow. 


Jona. Sargent, 


27 




Hawke. 


Johnson Smith, 


30 




Lyman. 


James Smith, 


27 




Plaistow. 


Stephen Stewart, 


26 




Kingston. 


Benj. Towle, 


27 




Plaistow. 


Wm. Thomas, 


26 




Atkinson. 


John True, 


26 




Sandown. 


Samuel Underwood, 


30 




Lyman. 


Israel Underwood, 


30 




Lyman. 


Joseph Whittiker, 


27 




Plaistow. 


Commings Whitcomb, 


30 




New Concord. 


Samuel Webster, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


Joseph Watts, 


30 




Lyman. 


Uriah York, 


26 




E. Kingston. 


Jerry Goodrich, Waiter, 


Oct. 1 




Portsmouth. 


John Wendal, " 


1 




Portsmouth. Subalterns. 


John M. Kinnon, " 


1 




Portsmouth. Subalterns. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



181 



Roll of Capt. John Willey's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



For what time. Residence and Remarks. 



John Willey, Captain, 
Ebenezer Cromit, 1st Lieut. 
Reuben Wyman, 2d ' 
Thomas Vesey, 3d ' 
Sainl. Willoughby, Ensign, 
John Thornton, Sergeant, 
Zachariah B. Hall, " 
Benjamin Bryant, " 
Jeremiah Cranmore, " 
Joshua Oilman, " 

Fayette Barron, Corporal, 
Isaac Chamberlin, " 
Sewall Walcott, " 

John Drew, " 

Erasmus E. Hatch, Music'n, 
Daniel Sellingham, " 

PRIVATES. 

AsaRobbins, 
Asha Goodhue, 
Albert Emerson, 
David Alls, 
Daniel Porter, 
George Hooper, 
Henry Hall, 
Ira Morse, 
Jona. Hall, 
Joseph Chamberlain, 
Joseph Kimball, 
John Thurstin, 
Jeremiah Glines, 
James Ramsey, 
John Mastin, 
Joseph Smith, 
Jedediah Moses, 
Joseph Smith, jr., 
Joseph Russell, 
James R. Hatch, 
John Page, 
Jonathan Jameson, 
Jeremiah Elliott, 
Jonas Keyes, 
Moses Chase, 
Miles Reynolds, 
Peter Avery, 
Reuben Draper, 
Ricker Plaisted, 
Russell Ford, 
Patee Richard, 
Richard H. Bartlett, 
Simon Fogg, 
Stephen York, 
Samuel Pierce, 
Stephen Bodge, 
Samuel Osborn, 
Thomas Greenleaf, 
Timothy Peasley, 
William Vincent, 
Jesse Page, 
Robert Harriman, 
John Phipps, jr., 
John Levitt, 
John Levitt, jr., 
Mitchell Emerson, 
Edmund Hamilton, 
John Burnham, 
Ivory Perkins, 



Sept, 29, 1814 

25 

Oct. 8 

6 

Sept. 29 



Oct. 5 
Sept. 29 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Oct. 5 

5 

Sept. 29 



Sixty days 



Oct. 5 
5 
Sept. 29 
29 
Oct. 5 
Sept. 29 



Oct. 5 
Sept. 29 



Oct. 5 

5 

Sept. 29 



Oct. 



Sixty days 



Campton. 

Durham. 

Chatham. 

TuftonboroUgh. 

Rumney. 

Thornton. 

Rumney. 

Campton. 

Chatham. 

Effingham. 

Peeling. 

Plymouth. 

Holderness. 

Holder ness. 

Thornton. 

Peeling. 



Plymouth. 

Campton. 

Rumney. 

Plymouth. 

Durham. 

Durham. 

Rumney. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Holderness. 

Holderness. 

Holderness. 

Rumney. 

Rumney. 

Campton. 

Campton. 

Rumney. 

Peeling. 

Thornton. 

Thornton. 

Durham. 

Lee. 

Plymouth. 

Thornton. 

Lee. 

Thornton. 

Plymouth. 

Holderness. 

Rumney. 

Thornton. 

Lee. 

Holderness. 

Holderness. 

Thornton. 

Durham. 

Lee. 

Holderness. 

Holderness. 

Peeling. 

Conway. 

Chatham. 

Chatham. 

Eaton. 

Chatham. 

Conway. 

Conway. 

Adams. 



Died in hosp. 
[Nov. 19, 1814. 



[Nov. 8, 1814. 
Discharged 



[Nov. 8, 1814. 
Discharged 



1814. 



Conway. Discharged Nov. 



182 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Willey's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Aaron Rumney, 


Oct. 4, 1814 


Sixty days 


Eaton. 


John Hatch, 








Eaton. 


Luther Harriman, 








Bartlett. [8, 1814 


David Allen, 








Burton. Discharged Nov 


Stephen Littlefield, 








Conway. 


Daniel Ordway, 








Conway. 


Nath'l Sawyer, 








Conway. [7, 1814 


Daniel Gray, 








Adams. Discharged Nov 


Joseph Hoit, 








Wolfborough. 


John Shepard, 








Wolfborough. [hospital 


Stephen Edmunds, 








Wolfborough. Sick in th< 


Joseph Gray, 








Wolfborough. [Nov. 11, '14 


John A. Wiggins, 








Wolfborough. Desertec 


James Rogers, 








Wolfboro'. Dis.Nov. 6,'14 


George Smith, 








Tuftonboro'. Dis. !Nov. 11 


Daniel Young, 








Wakefield. [1814 


Jeremiah Brown, 








Wakefield.- 


Nathan Watson, 






' Wakefield. 


Joseph Stagpole, 






' \ Wakefield. 


Walter Gate, 


4 




' Wakefield. [11, 1814 


John Saunders, 


Sept. 29 




' Campton. Discharged Nov 


Samuel Davis, 


29 




' Campton. Discharged Oct 


Reuben Plummer, 


Oct. 5 




' Wakefield. [5, 1814 


Benjamin T. Hall, 






' Effingham. 


Samuel Frost, 






' 'Effingham. 


Jonathan Edgerly, 






' Effingham. 


Peter Hawkins, 






' jEffingham. 
' jEffingham. 


David Taylor, 






Benjamin Russell, 






' [Effingham. 


Nath. Glidden, 






' Effingham. 


Benjamin Clough, 






' Effingham. 


Samuel Greenleaf, 






' Effingham. 


John Gile, 






' Effingham. 


Jeremiah Champion, 






' Effingham. 


Enoch P. Davis, 






' Windham. 


Jonathan Wiggin, 


4 




' |Ossipee. 


James Nichols, 


4 




' Effingham. 


John Dore, 


5 




« Wakefield. 


Phineas Hammond, 






' lOssipee. 


Stephen Hawkins, 






' jWolfborough. 


Levi Abbot, 


4 




' jOssipee. 

' Tuftonborough. 


David Hull, 






John Cook, 






* Wakefield. 


Levi Pray, 






' Ossipee. 


Moses Skedgule, 






' lOssipee. 


Mark Horsoni, 






' I Lebanon. 


Daniel Morrison, 






' Tuffonborough. 


Thomas Frigs, 


5 




' jWolfborough. 


Levi Chase, 


5 




' Tuffonborough. 


Jesse Merrill, 


8 






Conway. 


Nath'l M. Meserve, 


4 






Ossipee'. 


Reuben Davis, 


" 






Ossipee. 


Josiah L. Abbott, 


" 






Tuffonborough. 


Benj. Harden, Waiter, 


Sept. 30 




' jPortsmouth. 


John Carter, " 


u 




{ Portsmouth. 


Hoses Lock, " 


" 




' JPortsmouth. 


John Willey, 


" 




' iWolfborough. 


Daniel Drew, 


" 




' jWolfborough. 


Jesse Hall, 


" 




' 'Wolfborough. 


John Lucy, 


" 




' Adams. 


Ebenezer Davis, 


" 




1 Thornton. Discharged. 


Wm. Hallard, 


" 


" Moultonborough. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



183 



Boll op Capt. Joshua Meriam's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Bemarks. 


Joshua Meriam, Captain, 


Oct. 4, 1814 


Sixty days 




Samuel Carleton, Lieut., 


15 


" 




Daniel Pillsbury, " 


4 


a 




John Worthin, " 


" 


tt 




Obed Hall, 2d, Clerk, 


15 


it 




Bradly Eastman, Sergt., 


4 


it 




Benj. Hoit, " 


" 


il 




"William Lord, " 


9 


a 




Aaron Emmons, " 


4 


a 




George Fall, " 


15 


a 


Turned to the ranks. 


Jona. Rogers, " 


" 


a 


Discharged Nov. 9th, 1814, 


Benjamin Demick, " 


9 


a 


Turned to the ranks. 


Hazen Colby, Corporal, 


4 


" 


Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 


Joseph Metcalf, " 


" 


n 


Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 


Nath'l Sleeper, " 


it 


it 


Dischaaged Nov. 7, 1814. 


Page Atwell, " 


a 


" 


Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 


Mark Merrill, " 


15 


it 


Turned to the ranks, and 
disch'd the 9th as private. 


Wm. Hazeltine, Musician, 


4 


it 


Turned to the ranks. 


John Crocker, " 


15 


it 


Discharged Nov. 6, 1814. 


John Hanson, " 


9 


it 


Turned to the ranks. 


Samuel Leighton, " 


a 


il 


Turned to the ranks. 


PRIVATES. 








Samuel Webster, 
Peter Smith, 


Oct. 4, 1814 


Sixty days 




John Bumford, 


« 


ii 




Sanders McMurphy, 


it 


a 




Amos Tenny, 


<< 


it 




Moses Hoit, 
Samuel Hoit, 
Moses Blaisdell, 


a 


a 




it 


ii 




it 


ii 




Ziba Colburn, 


a 


tt 




Josiah Wheat, 


ii 


n 




Cummins Butterfield, 


tt 


u 




John Leavitt, 


It 


a 




Moses P. Judkins, 


It 


ii 




George Cross, 


it 


n 




Daniel McMurphy, 


a 


ii 




David Foster, 


it 


a 




B roadstead Farley, 


tt 


a 




Kufus Pike, 


a 


a 




Jona. Wise, 


a 


a 




Elias Perkins, 


tt 


a 




Obadiah Judkins, jr., 


it 


u 




Joseph Braley, 


a 


tt 




Moses Smith, 


a 


a 


Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 


Thomas Crawford, 


" 


a 




Ezra Crawford, 


" 


tt 


Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 


Benj. Kimball, 


it 


it 




Amos Flanders, 


tt 


a 


Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 


Christopher Clement, 


" 


tt 




Eben. Avery, 


tt 


a 




John N. Carlton, 


tt 


it 




Nath'l Christian, 


tt 


il 




Care Buswell, 


n 


il 




Daniel Foster, 


ii 


it 




Daniel Bullock, 


5 


a 




Samuel Goodwin, 




a 




John Barney, jr., 


tt 


ii 




Henry Springer, 


tt 


it 




Wm. Barbour, 


a 


a 




James Atwell, 


(C 


n 




James Atwell, jr., 


tt 


a 




Daniel Drake, 


ii 


n 




Elijah Smith, 


il 


a 




Thomas W. Flanders, 


4 


a 




David Norris, 


5 


n 




Nath'l Martin, 




" 





184 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



Roll of Capt. Meriam's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


1 
When enlisted. For what time. 


Remarks. 


Eben. Frie, 


Oct. 5, 1814 


Sixty days 




Nath'l George, 
Nath'l Critcliet, 


10 






" 






Edward Brown, 


n 




Discharged Nov. 7, 1814. 


Robert K. Place, 


15 






Nath'l Merrill, 


" 






Pliineas Straton, 


(i 






Ansel Brag, 


" 






Amos Eastman, 


" 






Richard Burns, 


a 






George Wentworth, 


" 




Discharged Nov. 9, 1814. 


Nath'l Ham, 


11 






Nath'l Emery, 


" 






Isaac Stanton, 


<< 




Discharged Nov. 6, 1814. 


Orlando Harriman, 


a 




Discharged Nov. 6, 1814. 


Joseph Weeks, 


K 






John Weeks, 


(( 






Stephen Rogers, 


a 






Aaron Seavy, 


" 




Discharged Nov. 9, 1814. 


Ralph M. Carter, 


" 






Samuel Rogers, 


" 






Gideon Powers, 


4 




Discharged Nov. 8, 1814. 


Samuel Kimball, 


" 






Valentine Willey, 


9 






Daniel Nudd, 


" 






Samuel Fernald, 


a 






Edmund Wentworth, 


« 






Isaac Stellings, 


a 






Wm. Goldsmith, jr., 


a 






John F. Young, 


" 






Jabez Garland, 


a 






John Bennet, 


" 






Peter Judkins, 


" 






Nath'l Sweasy, 


" 






Thomas Huckins, 


" 






John Andrews, jr., 


" 






John Kenny, 


" 






Benj. Peavy, 


" 






Stephen Severance, 


" 






Daniel Quimby, 


<( 






John Sullivan, 


« 






John Nock, 


" 




Present, sick. 


Mahew Clark, 


tt 




Discharged Nov. 10, 1814. 


Samuel Flanders, 


l( 






Jona. Morrison, 


tt 






Wm. Tibbetts, 


ft 






John T. Wiggin, 


" 






John Drew, 


" 






Jona. Cook, 


" 






Daniel Grant, 


" 




Present, sick. 


Stephen Sullivan, 


tt 






Wm. Pickering, 


" 






Gilman Smith, Waiter, 4 







military history of new-hampshire. 185 

Roll of Capt. Ware Dearborn's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Ware Dearborn, Captain, 


Oct. 7, 1814 


Sixty days 


Effingham. 


Chase Perkins, 1st Lieut., 


12 






Sanborn ton. 


Bradbury Morrison, 2d Lt., 


12 






Sanborn ton. 


John Hilton, 3d Lieut., 


Sept. 25 






Deerfield. 


William Eaton, Ensign, 


Oct. 12 






Sanbornton. 


Ebenezer Brown, Sergeant, 


12 






Sanborn ton. 


Asa Currier, " 


12 






Sanbornton. 


Jonathan Taylor, " 


12 






Sanbornton. 


Nathan Fogg, " 


12 






Sanbornton. 


John D. Miles, " 


5 






Bath. 


Samuel Ferris, " 


5 






Bath. 


Joshua Bishop, " 


Sept. 26 






Deerfield. 


Nathaniel Buswell, Corp., 


Oct. 12 






Sanbornton. 


Stephen Hersey, " 


12 






Sanbornton. 


Abijah Sanborn, " 


12 






Sanbornton. 


Reuben Smith, " 


5 






Bath. 


Ebenezer Colby, Musician, 


12 






Sanbornton. J 


Thomas Webster, " 


12 






Sanbornton. 


PRIVATES. 








David Locke, 


Oct. 5, 1814 


Sixty days 


Bath. 


Charles Ayres, 


12 






Sanbornton. 


John Abram, 








Sanbornton. 


Nathaniel Badger, 








Sanbornton. 


John Bumford, 








Sanbornton. 


Jacob Bumford, 








Sanbornton. 


Thomas Bruise, 








Sanbornton. 


Peter Burley, 








Sanbornton. 


Taylor Clark, 








Sonbornton. 


Ebenezer Caverly, 








Sanbornton. 


John Crockett, 








Sanbornton. 


James Cate, 








Sanbornton. [7, 1814. 


David Ellsworth, 








Sanbornton. Disch. Nov. 


Jeremiah Ellsworth, 








Sanbornton. Disch. Nov. 


Abram Fowler, 








Sanbornton. [7, 1814. 


Reuben Giles, 








Sanbornton. 


Samuel Gilman, 








Sanbornton. 


David Henderson, 








Sanbornton. 


Robert Hunkin, 








Sanbornton. 


John Hunkin, 








Sanbornton. 


Abraham Hunt, 








Sanbornton. 


William Hiniford, 








Sanbornton. 


Charles Lowgee, 








Sanbornton. 


David Lane, 








Sanbornton. 


Kelly Lakeman, 








Sanbornton. 


Thomas Lane, 








Sanbornton. 


John Leavitt, 








Sanbornton. 


Joseph Leavitt, 








Sanbornton. 


John Morrison, 








Sanbornton. 


Richard Prescot, 








Sanbornton. 


Joseph Philbric, 3d, 








Sanbornton. 


Joseph Philbric, jr., 








Sanbornton. 


Nathan Philbric, 








Sanbornton. 


Nathaniel Robinson, 








Sanbornton. 


Jonathan Sandborn, 4th, 








Sanbornton. 


James Sandborn, 4th, 








Sanbornton. 


Jonathan Sandborn, 3d, 








Sanbornton. 


Josiah Sandborn, 








Sanbornton. 


Simeon Sandborn, 








Sanbornton. 


Joseph Shute, 








Sanbornton. 


John Sawyer, 








Sanbornton. 


William Sandborn, 








Sanbornton. 


Levi Tilton, 








Sanbornton. 


Reuben Whitcher, 








Sanbornton. 


Stephen Brown, 


Sept. 26 






Deerfield. 


James Brown, 
Lowel Batcheldor, 








Deerfield. 








Deerfield. Disch. Nov. 10, 


Christopher Collins, 








Deerfield. [1814. 



186 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Dearborn's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Joseph Chase, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Deerfield. 


David Chase, 








' |Deerfield. Absent, sick. 


John Cochran, 








' Deerfield. 


Jeremiah Eastman, 










Deerfield. 


Ebenezer Huckins, 










Deerfield. 


Josiah Lunt, 










Deerfield. 


Reuben Langlee, 










Deerfield. 


Jeremiah Maloon, 










Deerfield. 


Timothy Pearson, 










Deerfield. Disch. Nov. If 


True Prescott, 










Deerfield. ["1814 


Stephen Prescott, 








' Deerfield. 


Joseph Prescott, 








' Deerfield. 


Josiah Rollins, 










Deerfield. Disch. Nov. 1 


Abraham Rowel, 










Deerfield. [1814 


Stephen Smith, 










Deerfield. 


Samuel Steams, 










Deerfield. 


Jonathan Veasy, 










Deerfield. 


Mesheck Weare, 










Deerfield. 


John Wallace, 








' Deerfield. 


John Baily, 


Oct. 








Bath. 


Daniel Bowman, 










Bath. 


Benjamin Bowman, 










Bath. 


Sergant Currier, 










Bath. 


Jeremiah Carlton, 










Bath. 


Joseph Estabrooks, 










Bath. 


Samuel Hunt, 










Bath. 


Joseph Little, 










Bath. 


John Little, 










Bath. 


Henry Long, 










Bath. 


Caleb Nois, 










Bath. 


Nathan Parker, 










Bath. 


Daniel Stickney, 










Bath. 


James Stickney, 










Bath. 


Timothy Stickney, 










Bath. 


George Young, 










Bath. 


Bradley Way, 










Bath. 


Moses Long, Waiter, 


Oct. 17 






Portsmouth. 


John Marden, " 


Sept. 30 




' Portsmouth. 


Lashley Mitchell, " 


Oct. 17 




' 1 Portsmouth. 


David Lock, 


5 ' 


< iBath. 



military history of new-hampshire. 187 

Field and Staff Roll of the Fourth Regiment of De- 
tached Militia. 
Isaac Waldron,* Lieut.-Colonel Commandant. 
John Dearborn, 1st Major. 
Daniel Smith, 2d Major. 
Ichabod Bartlett,f Quartermaster. 
Robert Woodbury, Surgeon's Mate. 
Jeremiah Kingman, Serge ant-Major. 
Joseph Chesley, 3d, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

* Colonel Isaac Waldron was born in Barrington in 1746. He was a man of great 
enterprise. He kept a store, tavern, and cultivated a farm for a great number of years, 
besides being engaged largely in public affairs. Aside from minor town offices, he rep- 
resented his native town in the legislature for twenty years prior to 1815. He held 
office in the militia of his town before the Revolution and after. At the organization 
of the militia in 1796, under the present Constitution, he was Major of the 2d Battalion 
of the 25th Regiment, and continued as such till 1801, when he was appointed Lieut.- 
Colonel Commandant of the same, and held that commission till 1816. He died at Bar- 
rington, May 3, 1845, aged 95 years. The fact that he was at the head of a regiment at 
the age of 68 years as a volunteer, and in actual service, shows not only his great 
patriotism, but his great energy of character. He was the father of the Hon. Isaac 
Waldron, late of Portsmouth, an eminent merchant of that city. 

f Lieut. Ichabod Bartlett was of Durham. He was the son of Dr. Joseph Bartlett, 
of Salisbury, born July 24, 1786, and graduated at Dartmouth in the class of 1808. 
"He read law with Moses Eastman and Parker Noyes, Esqs., of Salisbury; was 
admitted to the bar in 1811, practised a short time in his native town, and 
then moved to Durham. In 1816 he removed to Portsmouth, where he became 
eminent in his profession, with such compeers as Mason, Sullivan, and Woodbury. 
He was Clerk of the Senate in 1817 and 1818, member of the House of Representatives 
from Portsmouth in 1820, and member and Speaker of the House in 1821. He was 
Judge-Advocate of the 3d Brigade in 1819, 1820, and 1821, and Aid to Governor Bell 
through his administration. He was Solicitor for the county of Rockingham for three 
years from 1819. In this office he displayed that tact, acumen, and ability as an advo- 
cate that, in after-years, left him no rival at the New-Hampshire bar as a criminal 
lawyer. In 1823 he was chosen a Representative to Congress, and was re-elected in 
1825 and 1827, serving three terms. His reputation as an advocate had preceded him, 
and in the debates arising he sustained his reputation as a debater. His tact, ability, 
and eloquence attracted the attention of " the Orator of the West," Mr. Clay, and he 
deliberately made an attack upon "the young gentleman from New-Hampshire," as 
provoking as it was " uncalled for." But he found Mr. Bartlett " with lance at rest," 
ready for the attack. In " the measure of lances " that followed, " the young gentle- 
man from New-Hampshire " did not come off second best. Mr. Clay had evidently 
reckoned upon an easy demolition of his opponent, but in this he was mistaken. He 
found there were blows to receive as well as to give. After the encounter, Mr. Bart- 
lett's friends collected around him, and congratulated him upon his success. Mr. 
Randolph, of Virginia, though of very slight acquaintance, said to him : " I thank you 
personally for your speech. I congratulate you upon your success in this ' passage at 
arms' with the overbearing member from the West." But the matter did not rest 
here. Mr. Clay felt angry, and, as Congress was about to adjourn, he sent a friend to 
suggest to "the gentleman from New-Hampshire" that he had better wait a meeting 
for the adjustment of affairs. But here he found his equal. Col. Bartlett replied at 
once, " I'll wait." And he did. He and his friend, the late Judge Harvey, tarried in 
Washington three days, but, hearing nothing further of " the meeting," they returned 
to New-Hampshire. Upon leaving Congress, Col. Bartlett resumed the practice of the 



188 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. John D. Harty's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


John D. Harty, Captain, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Eighteen days 




James Whitehouse, Lieut., 


" 








Ephraim Nutt, Ensign, 


a 








Wm. Twombly, Sergeant, 


" 








Robert Mcintosh, " 


" 








Jer'y Wentworth, " 


tt 








Reuben Twombly, " 


" 








Charles Ricker, Corporal, 


<< 








Alphonso Gerrish, " 


a 








Philip Hubbard, " 


it 








Wm. Clark, " 


a 






Substitute for Nath'l Ham 


PRIVATES. 








Joseph Austin, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Eighteen days 




Joseph Bickford, 


< 








Substitute for John Nute. 


Samuel O. Bradley, 


< 










David Bickford, 


« 








Substitute for Nathan Ela. 


Eben'r Cole, 


< 










Moses Carr, 


( 










Geo. Carter, 


< 








Sub. for James Clements. 


Benj. Clements, 


< 










P. H. W. Chandler, 


i 








Sub. for John Kittridge. 


Peter Cushing, 


i 








Sub. for Thos. Card. jr. 


Theo. Card, 


< 








Sub. for John W. Haynes. 


Enoch Brew, 


< 










Wm. P. Drew, 


« 








Sub. for Jacob Kittredge. 


John Drew, 


• 










Aaron Downs, 


t 








Substitute for Wm. Drew. 


Francis Hanson, 


< 










Jeremy Drew, 


< 










Jesse Drew, 


< 










Joseph Ela, 


< 










James Foss, 


* 










Wm. Foss, 


' 








Sub. for Capt. I. Wingate. 


Joseph Gage, 


' 










John Holmes, 


i 










Jona. Ham, 


t 










Eri Perkins, 


( 










Ephraim Hall, 


< 










Stephen Ham, 


t 










Samuel Ham, 


i 










Nath'l Ham, 


< 










Joseph Hanson, 


< 











law, and at once placed himself at the head of the profession in New-Hampshire. He 
subsequently took very little part in political life, but was a member, from Ports- 
mouth, of the House of Representatives in 1830, 1838, 1851, and 1852. He was also a 
member of the Convention, from Portsmouth, in 1850, to revise the Constitution, and 
took a distinguished part in the debates of that body. Col. Bartlett died at Ports- 
mouth, Oct. 19, 1853, aged 67 years. The Court of Common Pleas being in session at 
Portsmouth, upon the opening of the same on the 19th instant, Col. Bartlett's death 
was announced, and the court adjourned for the day. Appropriate resolutions were 
passed by the bar, and remarks made laudatory of the deceased as a gentleman of 
noble impulses and high legal attainments. 

On Thursday, the 20th of October, 1853, the Board of Aldermen of the City of Ports- 
mouth passed the following preamble and resolution : — 

" Whereas, learning the Hon. Ichabod Bartlett departed this life on Wednesday 
morning last, at the Rockingham House, and that the funeral services will be per- 
formed on Saturday afternoon next, at the Stone Church, at two o'clock,— 

" Resolved, That, out of respect for the high legal attainments of the deceased, ^vhich 
have frequently been called into requisition by our town and city in its corporate 
capacity, also for his services as a public officer who has been entrusted with impor- 
tant business of the State and nation, and likewise for the devotion he has ever mani- 
fested in the discharge of the public duties entrusted to him, this Board deem it 
proper to attend in a body the funeral solemnities." 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 189 

Roll op Capt. Harty's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Jenj. Hartford, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Eighteen days 




eremy Hanson, 




" 


Sub. for Moses Perkins. 


)avid Jenks, 




" 




7m. F. Shelley, 




" 




ames Keag, 




a 




ahum Ham, 




it 


Sub. for Clinton Meserve. 


enj. R. Moses, 




it 




ohn Nute, 




" 


Sub. for John Wingate. 


enj. Nute, 




" 




eorge Nute, 




" 




had Perkins, 




it 




7m. Palmer, 3d, 




a 




hos. Penderton, 




a 




aleb E. Roberts, 




" 




ohn Remick, 




" 


Sub. for Stephen Roberts. 


ames S. Ricker, 




" 




amuel Reynolds, 




" 




ohn Kendall, 




(t 




7m. Stackpole, 




" 


Substitute for Thos. Hale. 


amuel Smallcorn, 




i( 




ames Stibs, 




'< 


Sub. for Simon Wingate. 


ames Twombley, 




it 




harles Twombley, 




it 




amuel Varney, 




a 




enj. H. Warner, 




" 




ohn Watson, 




« 




ohn Woodhouse, 




11 


Absent without leave. 


amuel Went worth, 




a 


Sub. for Thos. Hanson. 


ames York, 




a 




saac B. Young, 




a 




enj. Hanson, 




" 


Sub. for J. B. Chadbourne 


ohn Wentworth, 




" 





190 



adjutant-general's report. 



Roll of Capt. Andrew Kute's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence. 


Andrew Nute, Captain, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Nineteen days 




Edward Pendexter, Lieut., 


" 






James Hooper, Ensign, 


" 






Thomas Rines, Sergeant, 


" 






Solomon Emerson, " 


" 


Eighteen days 




Hopley Demeritt, " 


" 






Andrew Cook, " 


" 






Jona. Leathers, Corporal, 


" 






Wni. Pinkham, " 


" 






Andrew Bodge, " 


" 






John Canney, " 


" 






James Nute, Drummer, 


" 






Hezekiah Cook, " 


« 






Eleazer Young, Fifer, 


" 






PRIVATES. 








Phineas Wentworth, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Nineteen days 




Jonathan Drew, 


" 


'* 




Moses Emerson, 


« 


" 




James H. Young, 


<< 


" 




Ely Demerritt, 


" 


" 




Eben. Demerritt, 


a 


" 




Joseph Shurlin, 


" 


" 




Moses Emerson, 3d, 


" 


(i 




Isaac Hanson, jr., 


" 


" 




Asa Bodge, 


(c 


" 




John Leathers, 


a 


" 




fm, Hanson, 


" 


" 




John Tebbetts, 


« 


" 




Israel Drew, 


" 


« 




Benj. Berrey, 


" 


" 




Stephen Demerritt, 


" 


ft 




John Pinkham, 


16 


Fourteen days 




Joseph Bum ham, 


16 


" 




Robert Spurlin, 


12 


Eighteen days 




Timothy Eastman, 


'* 


" 




Paul Willard, 


k 


" 




Fenton Watson, 


i( 


" 




Peter Hodgdon, jr., 


16 


Fourteen days 








MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Smith's Company. 



191 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Smith, Captain, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Eighteen days 




)aniel Wiggin, Lieut., , 






" 




Jeorge Odell, Ensign, 






tt 




?enj. Wiggin, Sergeant, 






<< 




Joseph Hoit, " 






" 




aeorge Barker, " 






(i 




William Mason, 






tt 




Samuel Jones, Corporal, 






" 




Samuel Sleeper, " 






it 




George B. Fifield, " 






tt 




Tames Huntress, 






" 




?rederick Marble, Music'n, 






" 




tichard Marble, " 






" 




James Smith, " 






Six days 


Discharged Sept. 17, 1814. 


PRIVATES. 








5zra Corson, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Eighteen days 




Shadrach Wiggin, 






" 




fames J. Wiggin, 






" 




3 arker Smith, 






" 




rhomas M. Leavitt, 






" 




William Taylor, 






" 




Tonathan Moor, 






" 




Tewett Wiggin, 






a 




A.sa Folsom, 






tt 




James Rolins, 






tt 




Abednego Fifield, 






" 




Jacob Pickering, 






" 




Slisha Chase, 






11 




George Marble, 






" 




Samuel T. Bennett, 






" 




Andrew Boardman, 






tt 




3aniel Broughton, 






" 




William Barton, 






" 




John Scammon, 






a 




Asa Merrill, 






" 




Daniel Tilton, 






it 




Parker Norris, 






(t 




Jonath Leavitt, 






tt 




Taylor Moore, 






a 




Joseph Smith, 






it 




Stephen Lacey, 






" 




Jesse Robinson, 






" 




Eben. S. Piper, 


'*■ « 




" 




)avid Wiggin, jr., 






tt 




Stephen Boardman, 






" 




Joseph H. Fifield, 






tt 




SJath'l Pickering, 






tt 




Samuel Sinclair, 






tt 




Levi Merrill, 






ti 




Jona. Langley, 






it 




jeorge Vickery, 






" 




Sben'r Taylor, 






tt 




Robert Rowe, 






" 





192 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. John Wingate's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


John Wingate, Captain, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Eighteen days 




Andrew Chase, 1st Lieut., 


" 


" 




Noah Marston, 2d " 


" 


u 




Merrick Piper, Sergeant, 


" 


<< 




George Lane, " 


it 


a 




Theop. Smith, jr., " 


a 


it 




Mark Barker, " 


a 


a 




Samuel Brewster, Corporal, 


" 


a 




John Grant, " 


a 


tt 




Nathan Brown, " 


a 


<( 




John Thurston, " 


" 


tt 




Charles Rollins, Drummer, 


«( 


" 




Thomas French, Fifer, 


" 


a 


Promoted to Fife-Major. 


PRIVATES. 








Joseph A.dams, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Eighteen days 




James Rowley, 




tt 




Chase Hill,. 




" 




Aaron Jewett, 




tt 




Charles Lane, 




<( 




Charles B. Orne, 




(C 




Samuel R. Piper, 




tt 




John Rundlett, 




11 




James Scammon, jr., 




tt 




John Smith, jr., 




11 




Reuben Stockbridge, 




a 




Andrew Taylor, 
Joseph Taylor, 




tt 






tt 




John Tompson, 




a 




Nathaniel Thurston, 




a 




David Thurston, 




it 




Nathaniel Wiggin, 




it 




Zebulon Wiggin, 




it 




Bradbury Wiggin, 




tt 




Theodore Wiggin, 
Walter W. Wiggin, 




tt 






a 




Thomas Wiggin, 




a 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 193 

Eoll of Capt. John W. Hayes's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted, 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



John W. Hayes, Captain, 
Benj. B. Garland, Lieut., 
Sam'l Hayes, Ensign, 
Eben Cornel, Sergeant, 
John Hays, 3d, " 
James Hanson, " 
Benj. Balch, " 

Joseph Cator, Corporal, 
Jere. Foss, " 

Asa Ham, " 

Isaac Bemick, " 
Thos. Larkins, Musician, 
James Place, " 

Sam'l Waterhouse, " 

PRIVATES. 

James Arlen, 
Sam'l- Arlen, 
Ezra Brock, 
John Brock, 
Elijah Berry, 
Joseph Brown, 
Sam'l Berry, 4th, 
Isaac Babb, 
Ebenezer Buzzel, 
Mark Brown, 
Theo. Babb, 
Jesse Babb, 
John Marden, 
Ezra Berry, 
John Clark, 
Wm. Cator, 
Aaron Clark, 
Ephraim Cator, 
Joel Cator, 
James Cator, 
Jonathan Church, 
Asa Davis, 
Daniel Davis, 
Samuel Demerit, 
Nath'i Foss, jr., 
Enoch Foss, 
Charles Felker, 
Zebedee H. Foss, 
Levi Felker, 
Elias Foss, 
George Gray, jr., 
Joseph Gray, 
Edmund Grover, 
Samuel Ham, 
John Hayes, jr., 
Thomas How, jr., 
Benjamin Hawkins, 
Isaac How, 
David Ham, 
John Ham, 
Joshua Haves, jr., 
Jonathan Drew, 
Daniel Locke, 
William Locke, 
Samuel Howard, jr., 
James Marder, jr., 
William Marden, 
Anthony Twombley, 
Joshua B. Parshley, 
Jeremiah Waterhouse, 

13 



Sept. 11, 1814 
12 



Sept. 30, 1814 
Sept. 29, 1814 



Sept. 12, 1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Sept. 29 



Sept 29 



Sept. 29 



1814 



Jonathan Church, though 
ordered to the post, ha 
not appeared. 



1814 



1814 



Jonathan Drew, though or- 
dered to march to tins post 
on the 12th of September, 
absolutely refused, and 
has not joined the com- 
pany. 

Deserted Sept. 20, 1814. 



194 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Hayes's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Bemarks. 


Isaac Garland, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




William Nute,. 




" 




Jonathan Berry, 




it 




Bitfield Sawyer, 




u 




Jeremiah Whitehouse, 




a 




Stephen Wingate, 






Stephen Wingate was 


George Foss, 4th, 




Sept. 29, 1814 


dered to march to t 


Daniel Foss, 




" 


post 13th of Sept., but 


Samuel Foss, 




" 


refused to join his comr 



military history of new-hampshire. 195 

Boll op Capt. Paul Montgomery's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



Discharged. 



Remarks 



ml Montgomery, Captain, 
jorgeFoss, 3d, Lieut., 
illiam Foss, 3d, Ensign, 
muel P. Foss, Sergeant, 
mothy Foss, 
miel Stiles, " 

miel McNeal, " 
illiam Howard, Musician, 
muel Hayes, " 

.h. B. Foss, Corporal, 
miel Bean, " 
aac Young, " 
svi Berry, " 

PBIVATES. 

idrew N. Hill, 
iron Fogg, 
inn Perkins, 
ancle Hinkley, 
miel Perkins, 
idrew Willey, 
)bert Foss, 
mon Foss, 
arles Kiell, . 
illiam Foss, 2d, 
idrew Montgomery, 
din B. Foss, 
iseph Stiles, 
lomas Parshley, 3d, 
illiam Sloper, 
ihn Stiles, 
imes Johnson, 
ephen Johnson, 
ones Berry, 
muel Johnson, 
mes Demerit, 
ias Felker, 
livid Foss, 
torge Berry, 
Lvid Hill, 
chard Foss, 
hn Davis, 
nil Brewster, 
lm Berr} r , jr., 
Ltt Berry, 
01. Berry, 
hn Swain, 
lm Hill, 
lm Thayer, 
ra Stanton, 
pholas Berry, 
enezer Hayes, jr., 
njamin Berry, 
hn Aiken, 
lm Littlefield, 
;hard Babb, 3d, 
jseph Lougee, 
lm Lougee, 
ivid Dean, 
miel Saunders, 
: veil Holmes, 
Jfcer Babb, 
njamin Hayes, 
flry Gray, 
1 3ob Sanders, 
lac Babb, 
|eph Saunders, 



Sept. 12,1814 



Sept. 18,1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Sept. 29,1814 



12 



196 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Montgomery's Company — concludec 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



Joseph Berry, 
Stephen Breck, 
Nath. Berry, 
George Ham, jr., 
Isrn.il Hall, jr., 
Y/illiam Sanders, 
Samuel Sanders, 
John Berry, 
John Holmes, jr., 
William Holmes, 
Ralph Foss, 
Joseph Holmes, 
Sampson Babb, 
Daniel Foss, 
Enoch Foss, 
Tliomas Chick, 
Levi Chatman, 
James Aiken, 
Jonathan Meneal, 
Stephen Berry, 
Peter Berry, 
William Berry, 



Sept. 



5, 1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



military history of new-hampshire. 197 

Boll of Capt. William Wiggins's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted, 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



liam Wiggins, Captain, 
ohen Paul, Lieut., 
kin P. Edgerly, Ensign, 
aes Willey, jr., Serg't, 
in'r Doe, " 

rk Willey, " 

>ert Furness, " 
phen Willey, Corporal, 
del Cram, " 

M Rand, " 

ply Johnson, " 
ncis Drew, Musician, 
eph Ellison, " 

PEIVATES. 

imas Chesley, 

ijamin Doe, 

liam French, 

mel Stacey, 

athan Dockham, 

ob Johnson, jr., 

tma Drew, 

eph Applebee, 

ob K. Watson, 

Tge Woodman, 

vey Presson, 

mel Drew, 

eph Thomas, jr., 

)t Burnham, 

luel Savage, 

del Willey, 

>ert Willey, 

■rge Libby, 

n Burnham, 

;h'l Ham, 

neas Willey, 

i Durgin, 

lothy Pendergast, 

ob Garland, 

liel Pinkham, 

eph Langley, 

r id Davis, 

ih Willey, 

mel Edgerly, 

liam Smith, 

phen Logan, 

han Kenison, 

sph Doe, 

m Downing, 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 28,1814 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 28, 1814 



20 



198 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Alfred Smith's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Alfred Smith, Captain, 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Sept. 28, 1814 




George Hall, 1st Lieut., 




(< 




Nathan Woodman, 2d Lt., 




" 




Benjamin Dame, 3d Lieut., 




" 




George Dame, Sergeant, 




" 




.Stephen Twombley, " 




a 




Dauiel Young, " 




ti 




Henry Wiggin, " 




" 




John Yeaton, 




(« 




Moses Woodman, " 




» 




Jacob Odell, Corporal, 




« 




James Durgin, " 




a 




John Pinkham, " 




u 




George Frost, jr., " 




" 




Francis Butler, Musician, 




tt 




Moses Hanscom, " 




ii 




Edward Mason, " 




a 




PRIVATES. 








Benjamin Tuttle, 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Sept. 28, 1814 




Bradbury Thomas, 


" 






Daniel Edgerly, 


" 






Ebenezer Joy, 


" 






Enoch Holt, 


«< 






Enoch Durgin, 


« 






Jacob Bennett, 


ct 






Jeremiah Elliot, 








James Smart, 


<< 






Levi Thompson, 


it 






"Willet Wedgewood, 


<« 






Samuel Chesley, 


" 






Timothy Emerson, 


a 






Thomas James, 


a 






Samuel Mathews, 


ii 






William Footman, 


" 






Edward Griffinths, 


" 






John P. Jones, 


ti 






Reuben French, 


(t 






James Pendergast, 


19 






Daniel Lakin, 


11 






Samuel Lamos, 


" 






Adoniram Griffin, 


" 






John Smith, 


" 






Daniel Taylor, 


" 






John Bean, 


" 







MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 199 

Roll op Capt. Job C. Waldron's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



Job C. Waldron, Captain, 
Benjamin Clinton, Lieut., 
Samuel Lock, Ensign, 
Richard Waldron, Serg't, 
Daniel Horn, 
James Waldron, " 
Paul S. Rollins, " 

John Pickering, Corporal, 
Samuel Rogers, " 
Daniel Young, " 
James Dore, 

Levi Macomber, Musician, 
Samuel Clement, " 

PRIVATES. 

James Gage, 
Gershom Thorn, 
Moses Wentworth, 
Nath'l Tibbetts, 
Nath'l Varney, 
Humphrey Brackett, 
Ephraim Smith, 
David Pierce, 
Aaron Palmer, 
William Watson, 
Henry M. Lendry, 
Winthrop Watson, 
James Wentworth, 
Eliphalet Jones, 
Ephraim Bickford, 
John Furber, 
Nath'l Varney, 
William Ricker, 
Elijah French, 
Thomas Ham, 
Thornton Baker, 
Jonathan H. Cushing, 
Levi Hussey, 
Daniel R. Carter, 
Thomas Roberts, 
Charles Carter, 
Thomas Plummer, 
Mathew Meriam, 
Joseph Herd, 
Job Hodsdon, 
Benjamin Hanson, 
Ezekiel Wentworth, 
James Gould, 
Joseph Dow, jr., 
James Weeks, 
James Hartford, 
Enoch Crocker, 
Moses Dowries, 
Stephen Stagpole, 
Samuel Downs, 
George Pierce, 
Cyrus Yeaton, 
James Ware, 
Moses Warren, jr., 
John Stiles, jr., 
Benjamin Lord, 
John Wentworth, 
John Dore, jr., 
Foseph Wentworth, 
Andrew Ham, 
James Ham, 
Edmund Drew, 
John Roberts, 5th, 
Reuben Randall, 
Paul Wentworth, 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Sept. 14, 1814 
11 



Sept. 29, 1814 



200 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll op Capt. Waldron's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Eben. Stagpole, 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




James Clements, jr., 


" 








James Brown, 


" 








Jared Hanson, 


" 








Hartford Baker, 


tt 








James Stagpole, 


" 








Daniel Drown, 


" 








James Robinson, 


n 








Samuel W. Carr, 


a 








John Laiton, 


u 








John Roberts, 6th, 


n 








Daniel Foss, 


a 








Hiram Brown, 


a 






• 


Samuel Pray, 


18 








Isaac Twombley, 


21 







military history of new-hampshire. 
Eoll of Capt. John Haven's Company. 



201 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


John Haven, Captain, 


Sept. 12,1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




David C. Page, Lieutenant, 


" 








Shadrach Heard, Ensign, 


tt 








James Wilson, Sergeant, 


a 








Enoch P. Heard, " 


" 








Stephen Jackson, " 


" 








Samuel Rand, " 


" 








William Smith, Corporal, 


« 








John Wentworth, " 


it 








John Hays, " 


" 








Isaac Hurd, " 


" 








PRIVATES. 








Sam'l Jackson, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




John Baker, jr., 


" 








Ira Tibbetts, 


" 








Simon Peavey, 


.i 








Eichard Wentworth, 


it 








James C. Cole, 


a 








Joseph Haines, 


" 








Joshua Brewster, 


a 








Ira Furber, 


" 








Tristam Heard, 


(t 








John Bickford, 4th, 


tt 








Israel Hoit, 


*' 








Ezekiel Tibbetts, 


it 








John Ellis, 


ft 








John Goodwin, jr., 


a 








James McDuffee, 


" 








Eben. Plummer, 


" 








Eichard Hayes, jr., 


" 








Henry Tanner, 


a 








Joseph Whitehouse, 


it 








Amos Barrows, 


" 








Nath'l H. Heard, 


" 








Jacob Ellis, jr., 


" 








Ezra Hayes, 


" 








Stephen Tibbetts, 


" 








Amos Adams, 


" 








Jacob Trickey, 


'• 








Samuel Roberts, 


" 








Benj . Roberts, 


it 








Jesse Tibbetts, 


" 








Hiram Witherell, 


" 








Sanborn Black, 


« 








Ezra Ricker, 


" 








Stephen Meserve, 


it 








Richard Varney, 


it 








John Whitham, 


" 








Eliphalet Colbath, 


" 








Israel Whitehouse, 


» 








Isaac Bickford, jr., 


it 








James Ham, jr., 


tt 








Wm. Jenness, 3d, 


a 








Oliver Evans, 


it 








Silas Dame, jr., 
James Howard, 


it 








tt 








James Foss, 


tt 








John Hoit, 


tt 








Benj. Page. 


" 








John Varney, 


it 








Wm. Pearl, 


tt 








Richard Howard, 


a 








Jethro Otis, 


if 








Richard Smith, 


it 








George Varney, 
Joel Varney, 


a 








Jonas M. Duffee, 


it 








Aaron Jenness, jr., 


it 








Ezra Drown, 


it 









202 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Haven's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Aaron Ricker, 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




Aaron Bickford, 


" 


" 




James Pickering, 


" 


it 




Amos Wallingford, 


" 


" 




Ezekiel Staunton, 


" 


a 




Eben. Giles, 


" 


a 




Richard Dame, 3d, 


" 


<( 




Jacob Whitehouse, 


<< 


a 




Wm, Warren, 


" 


" 




Isaac Bickford, 


" 


it 




Paul Pinkham, 


" 


a 




Samuel Nutter, 


" 


it 




Richard Plan, jr., 


" 


a 


* 


Rufus Evans, 


" 


" 




Joseph Pearl, 


11 


" 




Aaron Col bath, 


" 


" 




Moses Page, 


" 


" 




Samuel Stackpole, 


H 


" 




Eben. Garland, 


11 


" 





military history of new-hampshire. 203 

Eoll of Capt. William Courson's Company. 



Names. 



Remarks. 



William Courson, Captain, 
Thos. Plummer, 1st Lieut., 
Jeremy Nute, 2d " 

Joshua Wingate, Ensign, 
John Meserve, Sergeant, 
Jeremiah Jones, " 
Jacob Nute, " 

Nehemiah Kimball, " 
David M. Courson, " 
Elisha Goodwin, " 
Nath'l Watson, Corporal, 
Mark Demerit, " 

Theo. Furber, " 

Thos. Wentworth, " 
Jonathan Ham, " 
Stephen French, " 
Benj. Dore, Musician, 
Lewis Hayes, " 

PRIVATES. 

Peter Twombley, 
Ephraim Wentworth, 
Thos. Kicker, 
Ephraim Hartford, 
Micajah Otis, 
Jesse Hoit, 
Moses Whitehouse, 
Jona. Scruton, 
Isaac Jenness, 
Levi W. Leighton, 
Wm. Hayes, 
Daniel Leathers, 
Samuel Nute, 
Lemuel Chesley, 
Phineas Jonson, 
Samuel W. Seavy, 
Dennis Downing, 
Luke Furber, 
Mark Webster, 
Miles Scruton, 
Manassa Holmes, 
David Scruton, 
Noah Wentworth, 
Clement M. Davis, 
Phineas Ackerman, 
Nicholas Kicker, 
Joseph Roberts, 
Edmund Canney, 
Daniel Wentworth, 
Joseph Jones, 
William Martin, 
John C. Varney, 
John Thompson, 
John Edgerly, 
Joseph Tebbetts, 
John White, 
Samuel Moors, 
Daniel Watson, 
Winthrop Colbath, jr., 
Thomas Ham, 
Thos. Pinkham, 
Joseph Roberts, jr., 
Ichabod Bodge, 
Benj. Ham, 
John Leighton, 
Joseph G. French, 
Benj. Bunker, 
Timothy Stevens, 
Joseph Durgin, 
Shadrach Roberts, 
Wm. S. Summer, 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



204 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Courson's Company — concluded. 



Names. 



When enlisted. 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



John K. Walker, 
John G . Watson, 
Nathan Stephens, 
Jeremiah Drew, 
Cutler Davis, 
Wm. Trickey, 
Joshua King, 
Thos. Peavey, 
Eleazer Rand, 
Samuel C. Jones, 
Isaiah Peavy, 
John Walker, jr., 
James Bragdon,] 
Ezekiel Nute, 
Jeremiah Hill, 
Thomas Picker, jr., 
George Dore, 
Timothy Davis, 
John Wentworth, jr., 
Daniel Hayes, jr., 
James Twombley, 
Henry Miller, 
James Goodwin, 
Reuben Walton, 
William Downs, 
Isaac Hayes, 
John Nutter, 
Timothy Henderson, 
Enoch Jones, 
John Foss, 
Hopley Varney, 
Thos. Chapman, 
Aaron Twombley, 
Ebenezer Twombley, 
James Pinkham, jr., 
Reuben Wentworth, 
Daniel Farnham, 
George J. Knox, 
Isaac Stephen, 
James Evans, 
Joel Furber, 
Amos Gerrish, 
James Garland, 
Webster Miller, 
Nath'l Pinkham, jr., 
John Mills, 
James Varney, jr., 
Ebenezer Adams, 
John T. Varney, 
William Gerrish, 
William Drew, 
David Nock, 
John Boys, 
William Foss, 
James Merrow, jr., 
Wm. Burroughs, 
Thos. Garland, 
Daniel Wingate, 
John D. Remick, 
Norton Scates, 
James Hayes, 
James Thorn e, 
John C. Nute, 
Dodivat Dore, 
Richard Plumer, 
Ambrose Tuttle, 
John Tanner, 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



military history of new-hampshire. 205 

Roll of Capt. Horace Parmelee's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Horace Parmelee, Captain, 


Sept. 11,1814 


Sept. 28, 1814 




Major W. Morrow, Lieut., 


" 






Samuel Abbott, " 


a 






Richard Gove, Sergeant, 


it 






John Stephens, " 


a 






William Hanson, " 


a 






Stephen Evans, " 


" 






William Watson, Corporal, 


" 






Samuel Judkins, " 


" 






John G. Chase, " 


" 






Timothy Bicker, Musician, 


(« 






Joseph Lambert, " 


tt 






PRIVATES. 








Thomas Taylor, 


Sept. 11,1814 


Sept. 28, 1814 




Jonathan Ham, 


" 




Substitute for Stephen Pat- 


John Hussey, 


tl 




ten, jr. 


Nathan Wiggin, 


n 






Elijah H. Varney, 


" 






James Burrows, 








Paul D. Young, 


tt 






George Clerk, 


it 






John Smith, 


ti 




Substitute for Sargent Pat- 


Paul Kicker, 


n 




ten. 


John Gage, jr., 


a 






Jabez B. Burrows, 


n 






Jonathan Young, 


tt 






Thomas Merrow, jr., 


" 






Phineas Varney, 


" 




Substitute for Isaac Wat- 


Ichabod Canney, 


« 




son. 


Charles Waldron, 


a 






Thomas Burnham, - 


it 






Samuel Currier, 


tt 






Jeremiah Hanson, 


ti 






Timothy Hanson, 


tt 






James Twombley, 


it 




Absent without leave. 


Ralph Twombley, 


" 







206 adjutant-general's report. 

Col. Waldron's regiment was stationed at the South Rope- 
walk in Portsmouth, near to the Arsenal. The first twelve 
companies, doubtless, composed the 4th Regiment; the fifth, 
sixth, seventh, and eighth companies being the ones de- 
tached by the Governor's special order of Sept. 9, 1814, 
from the 25th Regiment (Col. Waldron's regiment in the 
militia) ; the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth companies 
being the ones detached from the 2d Regiment by the same 
order. The third company is the one detached from the 
35th Regiment by the same order ; and the fourth company 
(artillery) was also from the same regiment. 

Field and Staff Officers of the Fifth Regiment of 
Detached Militia. 

Thomas Lovering,* Lieut.-Colonel Commandant. 

David Towle, Adjutant. 

William Carrol, Quartermaster. 

Josiah Blake, Sergeant-Major. 

Ebenezer French, Quartermaster's Sergeant. 

* Col. Thomas Lovering was born in North Hampton about 1761, and was a farmer. 
He enlisted in the War of the Revolution at the age of fifteeen years, and served two 
years and eight months in the same. He had command of the 3d Regiment from Sept. 
10, 1809, as Lieut.-Colonel Commandant, until July 4, 1816, when he was appointed 
Colonel of the same. He resigned as Colonel June 26, 1819. The inscription upon his 
tombstone reads thus : — 

" Col. Thomas Lovering, a Patriot of the Revolution (served thirty-two months, from 
the age of fifteen). Died, being thrown from a carriage, Nov. 24, 1834, aged seventy- 
four." 



military history op new-hampshire. 207 

Koll op Capt. Christopher Flanders's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted 



Discharged. 



Remarks. 



Chris. Flanders, Captain. 
Jacob R. Pillsbury, Lieut., 
Kicliard Currier, Ensign, 
Edmund Pillsbury, Serg't, 
Joseph Jones, jr., " 
David Page, " 

Enos Kendrick, " 

Joseph Silver, Corporal, 
Thomas W. Sargent, " 
Beniah Titcomb, " 

Benj. Woodman, " 
Jacob Eastman, Fifer, 
Eben. Brown, Drummer, 
Parker Flanders, " 

PRIVATES. 

Nehemiah Ordway, 
Thomas Barnard, 
Reuben Flanders, 
Jacob Jones, 
Israel Sawyer, jr., 
Barnes French, 
Enoch Dearborn, 
James Woodman, 
Levi Young, 
Benjamin Clifford, 
Theophilus Goodwin," 
Enoch Bartlett, 
David Goodwin, 
Frederick Bagley, 
Benjamin Clifford, 
"William Foot, 
Thomas Wason, 
John Clifford, 
Daniel Thompson, 
Nath'l Woodman, 
Wells Goodwin, 
Enoch Titcomb, 
Thomas Currier, 
Thomas Flanders, jr., 
Thomas T. Merrill, 
Elbridge Sweet, 
William Palmer, 
French Bagley, 
Israel Woodman, 
Benjamin Currier, 
Theodore Sweet, 
Levi Eaton, 
Nath'l Jones, 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 



Sept. 29, 1814 



11, 1814 
11 
13 
11 



Sept. 29, 1814 



208 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Jonathan Nason's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. Discharged. 



Remarks. 



Jona. Nason, Captain, 
Joseph Akerman, Lieut., 
Aaron M. Gove, Ensign, 
Caleb Knight, Sergeant, 
Charles Chase, " 
Stephen Clark, " 
Richard Dodge, Corporal, 
John Marshall, " 
William Otis, " 

William Sanborn, " 
Jeremiah Hilliard, Music'n 
William Merrill, " 

PRIVATES. 

Tappan Chase, 
Edward Bennett, 
John Falls, 
John Pevere, 
Eliphalet Colcord, 
Luke Averill, 
James Green , 
Moses Morrill, 
Chase Williams, 
David Janvrin, 
John Porter, 
Jeremiah Godfrey, 
Joshua Janvrin, 
John Hardy, 
Greene Hoag, 
Elijah Dow, 
James Prescott, jr., 
Levi Sanborn, 
Joseph dough, 
Nathan Brown, 
Eben'r Clark, 
Josiah Prescott, 
Aaron Sanborn, 
Joseph Sanborn, 
Dearborn Lane, 
Jona. Brown, 
John Brown, 
Benj. Pike, 
James Calf, 
Gardner Greene, 
Jacob Davis, 
Sewall Brown, 
Benj. Eastman, 
John Smith, 
Reuben Bacheldor, 
John Morrill, 
Thomas Watson, 
Blake Lock. 
David Marston, 
Josiah Brown, 
William Bragg, 
Daniel Eaion, 
Jonathan Knowles, 



Sept. 12, 1814 



Sept. 12,1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



Sept. 29,1814 



On furlough. Sick. 
On furlough. Sick. 



military history of new-hampshire. 209 

Roll of Capt. Phillip Towle's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Pliillip Towle, Captain, 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




Samuel Dow, Lieutenant, 


" 






Richard Greenleaf, Ensign, 


" 






Willarcl Emery, Sergeant, 


<< 






Simon Towle, jr., " 


" 






Phillip Towle, jr., " 


k 






Samuel Cutts, " 


12 






John Moulton, jr., Corp., 


" 






Amos Towle, 3d, " 


" 






Jonathan Leavitt, " 


« 






Abraham Fogg, " 


<< 






J. T. Marston, Musician, 


a 






Phillip Towle, 3d, " 


13 






PRIVATES. 








John Batchelder, jr., 


Sept. 12, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




Dearborn Lane, 


" 


" 




Jonathan Blake, jr., 


" 


" 




James Blake, 


" 


" 


Abs. without leave 2 days. 


Jethro Blake, jr., 


« 


u 




Josiah Blake, 


« 


" 




Jonathan Marston, 3d, 


13 


" 


Absent one day. Substitute 


Levi Blake, 


12 


" 


for Nathaniel Blake. 


Nathan Blake, jr., 


" 


'• 




Moses Brown, 


a 


" 




Oliver Cilley, 


a 


" 




Moses Dow, 


15 


" 




John Cotton, 


12 


" 




Jonathan Daniels, 




<< 




Nathaniel Drake, 




" 




Abraham Drake, 




a 




Ebenezer T. Drake, 




(( 




Daniel Drake, 




28 


Abs. without leave 3 days. 


Anthony Emery, 




29 




John Moulton, 




" 




Samuel Garland, 




" 




Nathan Garland, 




« 




Jonathan Garland, 




" 




Simeon Godfrey, 




" 




Simeon Godfrey, jr., 




" 




William Godfrey, 




" 


Abs. without leave 2 days. 


Samuel Harden, 




" 




Asahel Johnson, 




ft 




Zacheus Roberts, 




11 


Substitute for E. Johnson. 


James Lamprey, 




" 




Jeremiah Lamprey, 




28 




Josiah Lane, jr., 




16 


Dismissed Sept. 16. 


Jacob Marston, 




29 


Substitute for D. W. Lane. 


Meshach Lane, 








Ebenezer Leavitt, 






Substitute for J. Lane, jr. 


Daniel Lane, 








Thomas Lane, jr., 








William Lane, jr., 








Jonathan Perkins, 




" 




Samuel Marston, 








Abraham Marston, 3d, 






Abs. without leave 3 days. 


Jacob Marston, jr., 








Caleb Mason, 








Abner F. Mace, 








Joseph Moulton, 








Jacob Moulton, 






Abs. without leave 1 day. 


Charles Moulton, 








Josiah Nudd, 






Abs. without leave 3 days. 


John Perkins, 






Abs. without leave 2 days. 


Ben Perkins, 






Abs. without leave 3 days. 



14 



210 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Towle's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. Remarks. 


Moses Perkins, jr., 


Sept. 12,1814 


Sept 28 


, 1814 


Samuel S. Page, 
Jeremiah Philbrook, 




29 




28 


John D. Shaw, 




29 


Samuel Shaw, 






' Substitute for Moses Shaw. 


John Garland, 








Willard Shaw, 








Henry Shaw, 








Josiah Shaw, jr., 








Moodv Stockman, 






' Abs. without leave 1 day. 


Joseph Towle, 3d, 








William Tuck, 






' Abs. without leave 1 day. 


Daniel Towle, 








Jonathan M. Locke, 






' Abs. without leave 1 dav. 


Daniel Towle, jr., 




16 Dismissed. 



military history of new-hampshire. 211 

Roll op Capt. Stephen Brown's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted, 



Discharged. 



Bemarks. 



Stephen Brown, Captain, 
Stephen Kimball, Lieut., 
Bichard Dow, Ensign, 
Jona. Morrison, Sergeant, 
Benj . Prescott, " 

Nathan Dow, " 

Caleb Brown, " 

Jacob Fetch, Corporal, 
David Prescott, " 

Sewel Philbrick, " 
Jeremy Batchelder, " 
Caleb Hodgdon, Musician, 
Williard Tilton, " 

PRIVATES. 

John Nudd, 
Benjamin Moulton, jr., 
Jonathan Hobbs, 
John W. Shaw, 
Jonathan James, 
Thomas P. Fogg, 
Samuel Fellows, 
Daniel Prescott, 
Abraham Bowe, 
David Barter, 
Edward M. Blaisdell, 
Caleb F. Sanborn,- 
Samuel Tilton, 
Ira Fellows, 
Wm. H. Wadley, 
Jere. Wadley, 
Sewel Wadley, 
John Blaisdell, 
Moses F. King, 
Joseph W. Healey, 
Edward True, jr., 
Lowel Locke, 
Porter Bowe, 
Jonathan Shaw, 
Theo. M. White, 
Benj. Odlin, 
Joseph D. Wadley, 
Ephraim Dow, 
Lewis Gove, 
Nath'l Fellows, 
Wm. S. Gale, 
Parker H. Willson, 
Joel Lane, 
Smith Lamprey, 
Gilman Lamprey, 
Newel Dow, 
Wadley Dow, 
Timothy Palmer, 
Sewel Dow, 
Stephen B. Brown, 
Levi Veasey, 
Jeremiah Eaton, 
Willard Davis, 
Beuben Currier, 
John Weare, 
Abel Page, 
Samuel Currier, 
John Page, 
Samuel Tucker, jr., 
Moses Sanborn, 
Amos Gove, 
Joseph Bowe, 
George Day, 
Bradbury Pervier, 
Oliver James, 
Samuel Caverly, 
John Scribner, 
Henry Eaton, 



Sept. 11, 1814 



Sept. 11 



Sept. 29,1814 



1814 



Sept. 29, 1814 



212 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Samuel James's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Samuel James, Captain, 


Sept. 13, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




Stephen Brown, 1st Lieut., 




" 




Jona. Hilyard, 2d " 




" 




Jacob Noies, Sergeant, 




" 




Wells Healy, ' 




" 




Samuel Tuck, " 




n 




Abel Brown, " 




a 




Nathan Brown, Corporal, 




19 




John Weare, " 




29 




Sam'l L. Lamprey, " 




" 




Amos Knowles, " 




<c 




Amos Boyd, Fifer, 




u 




Dearborn Godfrey, Drum'r, 




" 




PRIVATES. 








Jonathan Tilton, 


Sept. 13, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




John Collins, 








Jeremiah Locke, 








Ezekiel Woodman, 








David Woodman, 








Samuel Locke, 








Nicholas Brown, 








Benson Leavitt, 








Stephen Dodge, 






Absent all but six clays by 


Benj. Tilton, 






agreement. 


Henry Robie, 








Reuben Lane, 








Taylor Weare, 








Caleb Towle, 








Joseph Philbrick, jr., 








Jesse Knowles, 








Isaiah D. Palmer, 








Washington Fifield, 








George Janvrin, jr., 






[19, 1814, 


Benj. Lane, 






Promoted Corporal Sept. 



Note. — Col. Lovering's regiment was stationed at the South Ropewalk in Ports- 
mouth, with Col. Waldron's regiment. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



213 



Field and Staff Officers of a Battalion of Detached 

Militia. 
Nathaniel Sias,* Major. 

Ebenezer Cromett, Adjutant, Inspector, and Brigade Major. 
James Thorn, Quartermaster. 

Company Roll of Capt. Nathaniel Gilman, 3d. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Nath'l Gilman, 3d,t Capt., 


Sept. 9,1814 


Sept. 27, 1814 




Nath'l B. Gordon, Lieut., 


" 






William Odlin, Ensign. 


" 






N. P. Poor, Sgt. and Clerk, 


a 






William Charming, Sergt., 


a 






Oliver Brooks, " 


a 






John Gordon, jr., " 


a 






Samuel Somerly, " 


H 






Thomas Tyler, " 


" 






Edwin Channing, Corporal, 


" 






William Robinson, " 


<« 






Phillips Gilman, " 


13 






Henry 0. Mellen, " 


9 






John B. Hill, 


a 






Abraru Prescott, Musician, 


a 






Weare Prescott, 


16 






Samuel Eldridge, " 


9 






PRIVATES. 








Benjamin Bachelder, 


Sept. 9,1814 


Sept. 27, 1814 




Moses Bickford, 








Nath'l Bickford, 








Josiah Blake, 








John Cook, 






Substitute for E.L. Boyd, jr 


Francis Becket, 








Benjamin P. Bachelder, 








Moses Perkins, 






Sub. for Chas. C. Barstow. 


Benjamin Barker, 








Elijah Bean, 








James Clarke, 








Daniel Colcord, 








John R. Caldwell, 








John Clarke, 








James Clarke, 2d, 








Daniel Clarke, 








Solomon Davis, 








William Dickey, 








Peter Elkins, 








Joseph Edgerly, 








Jeremiah Fuller, 








James Folsom, 4th, 








Josiah Folsom, 3d, 


13 






Peter Folsom, 


9 






William Hood, jr., 


(t 







* Maj. Sias was of Newmarket. He was Major of the Fourth Regiment in 1814 and 
1815, and, as such, was in command of this battalion of detached militia. 

t Capt. Nathaniel Gilman, 3d, was the son of Hon. Nathaniel Gilman, of Exeter, 
where he was born Nov. 30, 1793. He was commissioned as Captain of the Second Com- 
pany of Infantry in the Fourth Regiment, April 13, 1813, by his uncle, Gov. John T. 
Gilman. He marched to Portsmouth, with his company of detached militia as above, 
and resigned Aug. 19, 1817. He was bred a merchant, was also much of a farmer, and 
in his later years a large landed proprietor. Capt. Gilman was in person tall and, 
erect, in character prompt and resolute, and as a citizen greatly respected. He died 
of a malignant tumor, Oct. 27, 1858, aged nearly sixty-five years. 



214 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Oilman's Company — concluded. 



Names. 



From when. Discharged, 



John Gilman, 
Francis Grant, 
David Godfrey, 
Abba Gilman, 
David Fogg, 
Joshua C. Gates, 
Joseph J. Hoyt, 
Samuel Tilton, 
John Haley, 
Theodore Hill, 
Gideon Scriggins, 
John Lougee, 
John Leavitt, 
John Marsh, 
Benjamin Melcher, 
Charles Marble, 
Joseph Greenleaf, 
Eliphalet Marston, 
Meserve Meader, 
Joseph Odlin, 
James Odlin, 
Nathan Parker, 
Moses Pike, jr., 
Samuel Pottle, 
William Penney, 
John Peavey, 
Samuel Robinson, 
John Rowe, 
Nath'l Robinson, 
John Roby, 
Lowell Rollins, 
Jacob Rowe, 
Meshech Rollins, 
Sargent Rowley, 
Eliphalet Sweet, 
William Fuller, 
Trueworthy Swasey, 
Benjamin R. Sanborn, 
William Sawyer, 
Henry Swasey, 
Isaac "Shephard, 
Amos Stickney, 
Nathaniel Souther, 
William Smith, 
Ludovicus Towle, 
Joseph Safford, jr., 
Simon Taylor, 
Lewis Wentworth, 
John Williams, 
Benjamin Wiggin, jr., 
John Webber, 
Benjamin Webster, 
William Wiggin, 
Joseph York, 
Noyes Hopkins, 
Oliver Webber, 
Joshua Weeks, 
George Smith, 
Josiah G. Smith, 
Samuel G. Smith, 
Abraham Towle, 
James Burley, 
Jonathan Bricket, 



Sept. 9,1814 



13 



13 



Sept. 27, 1814 



13 



Residence. 



Sub. for Kinsley Hall. 
Sub. for William Hovt. 



Sub. for T. Moulton. 



Major's waiter. 



Sub. for T. Robinson. 



Wounded and absent. 



military history of new-hampshire. 
Eoll of Capt. Peter Hearsey's Company. 



215 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Peter Hearsey, Captain, 


Sept. 9,1814 


Sept. 27, 1814 




Joseph Furnald, Lieut., 
John Kennard, Ensign, 




" 






a 




Andrew B. Shute, Serg't, 




u 




Amos Paul, " 




n 




Jere. Hearsey, " 




u 




Josiah Burleigh, " 




(C 




Samuel Brown, Corporal, 




" 




Andrew Hall, jr., " 




(< 




Wm. Wedgwood, " 




(i 




Daniel Smith, " 




(« 




William Pike, Drummer, 




« 




Daniel Hilton, Fifer, 




" 




PRIVATES. 








John Shute, 


Sept. 9,1814 


Sept. 27, 1814 




John Miles, 


<( 


a 




Eliphalet Neil, 


" 


" 




Henry Gilman, 


12 


a 




Asa Neil, 


9 


<< 




George Miles, 


« 


a 




William Kenniston, 


tt 


(( 




Ben,j. Norton, 


«< 


(( 




Nathan Presson, 


tt 


ti 




James Cram, jr., 


(i 


tt 




W. Willis, 


tt 


(< 




Zebulon Gilman, 


it 


d 




John Parks, 


" 


it 




Stephen Caswell, 


n 


" 




Wintrop Watson, 


19 


(( 




James Speed, 


9 


tt 




Mark Burleigh, 
Wintrop Burley, 


" 


ti 




tt 


it 




Josiah Smith, 


a 


it 




William Rosho, 


a 


(( 




Israel Gilman, 


12 


" 




Isaac Tuttle, 


9 


(( 




Benj. Shaw, 


a 


«« 




Benj. Leathers, 


(( 


it 




Thos. W. Fuller, 


(( 


ti 




Andrew Drown, 


« 


ti 




John C. Fowler, 


tt 


it 




Oliver Pinder, 


a 


" 





r 



216 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Joseph Towle's Company. 



Names. 



When enlisted. Discharged 



Remarks. 



Joseph Towle,* Captain, 
James B.Creighton, Lieut., 
John Dow, Ensign, 
Greenleaf Smith, Sergeant, 
David Lang, 
Jeremiah Sias, 
Asa Moulton, " 

John Elkins, Corporal, 
John Shaw, " 
James Glidden, " 
John Rollings, " 
John Clark, Musician, 
Benj. Smith, " 
Henry Roby, (i 

PBIVATES. 

Joseph Gooch, 
Noah Davis, 
Zebu Ion Davis, 
Benj. Dow, 
Chase Gilman, 
Ezra French, 
Sherborne Gove, 
Seth Fogg. 
Eben'r Til ton, 
Ephraim G. Taylor, 
John Lunt, 
James Falls, 
Seth Williams, 
Jeremiah Johnson, 
Chase Crockett, 
John Peavy, 
Samuel Haley, 
David Davis, 
Daniel Barber, jr., 
Dudlev Miles, 
Thomas D. Lyford, 
Joseph Loyd, 
Tristam Purington, 
Nehemiah French, 
Orren Shaw, 
David Rollins, 
Aaron Page, 
Richard K. Smith, 
Solomon Perkins, 
Stephen Wiggin, 
Eben'r Kennison, 
Micajah Hanscom, 
Micajah Bickford, 
James Thompson, 
John Edgerly, 
John Burnani, 
John L. Bartlett, 
Benj. Marden, 
Andrew Mials, 
Samuel Hills, 
Henry Cilley, 
Thomas Hanson, 
Thomas Rollings, 
Noah Dow, 



Sept. 10, 1814 



14 



Sept. 10, 1814 



Sept. 27, 1814 



Sept. 27, 1814 



* Capt. Joseph Towle was of Epping, and the son of Levi Towle, of thattown. Hewas 
born May 4, 1789, and was bred a farmer. He was appointed Captain of the Seventh 
Company of Infantry in the Fourth Regiment, Oct. 11, 1811 ; in command of a company 
of detached militia, July 12, 1812, for the defence of Portsmouth; again, in command of 
a like company for a like purpose, Sept. 1, 1812. and in command Sept. 10, 1814. for a like 
purpose. He was appointed Major ot the Fourth Regiment, May 16, 1817, and Colonel of 
the same in 1819. June 16, 1823, he was appointed Brigadier-General of the First Brig- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 217 

Roll op Capt. John Colcord's Company. 













Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


John Colcord, Captain, 


Sept. 11, 1814 


Sept. 28, 1814 




Edward Stevens, Lieut., 


" 








John Tuck, Ensign, 


" 








Nathan Smith, Sergeant, 


it 








Winthrop Dearborn, " 


It 








Daniel Woodman, " 


13 








Abraham McQuillen, " 


11 








Ira Bean, Corporal, 


<< 








David McQuillen, " 


" 








Moses Davis, " 


n 








Charles Perry, " 


a 








Caleb Hock, Drummer, 


" 








Benjamin Wilson, Filer, 


" 








PRIVATES. 








Moses Wadley, 


Sept. 11,1814 


Sept. 28, 1814 




Henry Cram, 


" 








Samuel Colcord, 


a 








James Gordon. 


11 








Ebenezer Smith, 


(t 








David Goodwin, 


(« 








Enoch Worthen, 


a 








Walter Little, ^^ 
Levi Ladd, ^*" 


it 

tt 








Jonathan Graves, 


" 








Thomas Graves, 


" 








James Robinson, jr., 


" 








Fifield Stevens, 


" 








Samuel Stevens, 


a 








Ephraini Gordon, 


a 








Thomas Gordon, jr., 


13 








Benjamin Edgerly, 


11 








Peter Fi field, 


" 








Simon Chase, 


tt 








Obadiah Bean, 


a 








Tappan Sanborn, 


n 








Sherburn Stevens, 


tt 








John Abbott, 


" 








John Smith, 4th, 


" 








Gilman Sleeper, 


u 








Gilman Robinson, 


14 








Eliphalet Robinson, 


14 








Jesse Prescott, 


13 








James Gordon, jr., 


14 








Jose Wadley, 


13 








Gideon Langmaid, 


14 








Thos. Leavitt, jr., 


13 








Jona. Robinson, 


13 








Henry Bean, 


14 








James Gilman, 


17 








David Wadley, 


11 








John Smith, jr., 


" 








David Stevens, 


" 









ade, and, July 2, 1825, Major-General of the First Division. June 7, 1831, he resigned 
the office of Major-General. In 1835 he was appointed Sheriff of Rockingham County, 
which office he held for the term of five years. He died Sept. 9, 1858, in the seventieth 
year of his age. In private and public life, Capt. Towle sustained the reputation of an 
upright, honest man ; and it is not a little to his credit that, during the war of 1812, he 
should have been selected twice by Gov. Plumer, and once by Gov. Gilman, to command 
companies of detached troops for the defence of our " maritime frontier." 



218 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll op Capt. James Thom's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


James Thom,* Captain, 


Sept. 10,1814 


Sept. 27, 1814 




Hollis C. Kidder, Lieut., 


" 


" 




Simon Winslow, " 


" 


<< 




Jeremiah Palmer, Serg't, 


tt 


ti 




Jonathan Dearborn, " 


t( 


" 




Edward Lawrence, " 


" 


a 




John F. Moses, " 


« 


it 




Jonathan Folsom, Corporal, 


" 


" 




Lawrence Brown, " 


<< 


«< 




Nath'l Rundlett, " 


tit 


" 




Stephen L. Gordon, " 


a 


" 


Pfajo 


Charles Parks, Drummer, 


l< 


" 


Promoted Sept. 12 to Drui 


Joseph Parks, Fifer, 






Promoted Sept. 13 to FL 
Major. 


PRIVATES. 








Henry Ranlet, 


Sept. 10,1814 


Sept. 27, 1814 




John T. Gordon, 




" 




Clias. F. Sleeper, 




a 




Nath'l Dutch, 




tt 




Isaac Flagg, 




(< 




Jesse Dolloff, 




a 




Samuel R. Gilman, 




ti 




Benj. Swazey, 




" 




Joseph R. Dearborn, 




u 




Nath. Kidder. 




" 




Jeremiah F. Young, 




" 




Levi Morrill, 




" 




John Rundlet, 




" 




James Chase, 




" 




Mark Tilton, 




" 




David Clifford, 




(< 




Samuel Haley, 




" 




Samuel Garland, 




ft 




Alexander Hodgdon, 




11 




Daniel Veasy, 




" 




Orren Edgerley, 




<( 




Edward Thing, 




k 




"Winthrop Robinson, 




(t 




John S. Noble, 




tt 




David Kelley, 




a 




Benj. Paul, 




" 




Robert Dun, 


18 


" 



* Capt. James Thorn was born at Londonderry, Aug. 14, 1785, and was the son 
Dr. Isaac Thom, of Londonderry, and a well-known lawyer of tbat place. He w; 
quartermaster of the post at Portsmouth Plains. He was Judge-Advocate of the Thh 
Brigade from 1817 to 1825. He was a man of a genial disposition and of social habit 
and largely respected in his native town. He died at Derry, Nov. 27, 1852, aged sixtr 
seven years. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 219 

Roll of Capt. Peter Robertson's Company. 



NAMES. 


When enlisted. 


Discharged. 


Remarks. 


Peter Robertson,* Captain, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Sept., 29, 1814 




Samuel Herbert,t 1st Lieut., 




" 




C. Eastman,* 2d Lieut., 




n 




Walter W. Hill, Sergeant, 




c< 




Jacob Hosmer, " 




" 




Jolm Robertson, " 




a 




Wm. Bell, " 




" 




Jeremiah Birch, Corporal, 




" 




Kath'l Parker, " 




" 




Jeremiah Elliott, " 




« 




Wm. Moody, " 




" 




Jeremiah Glines, Musician, 




" 




Hammon Eastman, " 




u 




Sam'l Hosmer, " 




a 




PRIVATES. 








Moses Bumford, 


Sept. 10, 1814 


Sept. 29, 1814 




Moses Eastman, 


" 


" 




Jona. Elliott, 


it 


a 




Josiah Furnald, 


«< 


u 




Cooper Frost, 


<< 


" 




Thos. Greenleaf, 


u 


" 




Sam'l Blanchard, 


»< 


(i 




Jacob Carter, 


" 


tt 




Moses Dickerman, 


<( 


" 




John Gould, 


" 


<( 




Josiah Knowles, 


" 


u 




Robert Rogers, 


" 


a 




John Stanyan, . 


" 


(t 




John Wheeler, 


(< 


" 




Charles Wait, 


" 


« 




Charles Whipple, 


<< 


a 




Charles Herbert, 


tt 


" 





* Capt. Peter Robertson commanded the company of artillery attached to the 
Eleventh Regiment of New-Hampshire Militia. He was originally from Amherst, and 
carried on the business of a baker. He was a man of energy, but not successful in 
business. He lived in a house on the northeast corner of the State-house yard, 
which was purchased by Col. William Kent and moved to Pleasant Street, where 
it is still standing. Capt. Robertson, for a time, was the popular landlord of what is 
now known as the Columbian Hotel, in Concord. He was appointed Brigade Quarter- 
master on Gen. Asa Robertson's staff, Aug. 19, 181G. Unsuccessful in business, he 
died at the almshouse in Concord. 

t Samuel Herbert was the son of Richard Herbert, of Concord, where he was born 
March 2, 1779. He and the other officers of this company were appointed and com- 
missioned for this occasion, being sustainers of the war; and Col. Cochran of Pem- 
broke, the commander of the Eleventh Regiment, was removed by address, at the 
next session of the Legislature, mainly for the reason that he recommended and 
secured these appointments. Capt. Herbert was a farmer, and was Deputy Sheriff' of 
the County for a time. He was modest and retiring in his manners, and lived highly 
respected to a good old age. He died at Concord, Jan. 13, 1867. 

His twin brother, Charles Herbert, was a member of the same company. He died 
at Concord, Aug. 25, 1829. 

t Chandler Eastman was the eldest son of Jacob Eastman, of the East Village, in 
Concord, and was born Dec. 31, 1784.. He kept a store for many years in his native 
village, and at the same time was engaged in farming and lumbering with his father. 
After middle age, he moved to Exeter, Me., where his father owned a tract of land. 
and where two younger brothers had taken up their residence. Here he cultivated a 
farm, was highly respected, and died in July, 1851, in the sixty-seventh year of his age. 



220 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL S REPORT. 



Maj. Sias's regiment was stationed at what is known as 
"Portsmouth Plains," about a mile southwest of the Court- 
house. The first four companies were from the Fourth 
Regiment, of which he was a major, and comprised the 
detachment ordered out from that regiment by the Gover- 
nor's special order of Sept. 9, 1814. The fifth company was 
one of artillery, from the Third Brigade ; and the sixth was 
one of artillery, from the Eleventh Regiment. 

Field and Staff Officers of the First Battalion of Ar- 
tillery of the Detached Militia. 
Edward J. Long, Major. 
Joseph Marsh, Adjutant. 
James Shepherd, Quartermaster. 
Francis Flanders, Musician. 

Roll of Oapt. David Haynes's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


David Haynes, Capt a in, 


Sept. 23,1814 


Sixty days 


Deerfield. Joined Sept. 2- 


Mark Fisk, 1st Lieutenant, 






" 


Londonderry. [161- 


Gilbert Chadwick, Q.M.Sgt, 






" 


Londonderry. 


Wm. Hutchins, Sergeant, 






" 


Salem. 


Joseph Merrill, " 






11 


Deerfield. 


Joseph Leach, " 






<( 


Londonderry. 


John Moore, Corporal, 






" 


Pembroke. 


Isaac Shephard, " 






" 


Deerfield. 


Amos Dow, " 






« 


Windham. 


John Chase, " 






" 


Londonderry. 


Thomas Moore, " 






a 


Windham. 


David Durrer, Musician, 






" 


Windham. 


Josiah Morrill, " 






a 


Deerfield. 


Samuel Showed, " 






« 


Londonderry. 


Joshua Lane, " 




«( 


Londonderry. 


PRIVATES. 








John Leach, 


Sept. 23,1814 


Sixty daya 


Londonderry. 


William Moore, 






" 


Londonderry. 


James Robert, 






" 


Londonderry. 


Francis M. Chase, 






« 


Londonderry. 


James Moore, 






" 


Londonderry. 


Benjamin Woodbury, 






(< 


Londonderry. 


James Smith, 






" Salem. 


Simeon Dustin, 






" ISalern. 


George Tictcomb, 






" 


Salem. 


Samuel Rowel, 






" 


Windham. 


Alexander Gordon, 






" 


Londonderry. 


Stephen McGregor, 






a 


Londonderry. 


Phineas Danforth, 






" 


Windham. 


James Simpson, 






n 


Windham. 


Win. Durrer, 






a 


Deerfield. 


Caleb Langley, 






11 


Deerfield. 


Benjamin Judkins, 






" 


Deerfield. 


Jesse Libby, 






" Deertield. 


James Dow, 






" Deerfield. 


Levi Palmer, 






" 


Deerfield. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 221 

Eoll op Capt. Haynes's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence. 


Levi Blaisdell. 


Sept. 23, 1814 


Sixty days 


Deerfield. 


George F. Blaisdell, 






(i 


Deerfield. 


Abraham True, 






a 


Deerfield. 


Stephen Bartlett, 






" 


Deerfield. 


John M. Todd, 






" 


Deerfield. 


Samuel Brown, 






(i 


Nottingham. 


Samuel Thurston, 






" 


Nottingham. 


Oliver Leathers, 






« 


Nottingham. 


Edward Richardson, 






a 


Nottingham. 


Hezekiah Randall, 






a 


Nottingham. 


James Atwood, 






(i 


Nottingham. 


John Demerit, 






a 


Nottingham. 


Eliphalet Darfforth, 






a 


Londonderry. 


John Adams, 






" 


Londonderry. 


Parker Adams, 






« 


Londonderry. 


Humphrey Morse, 






" 


Londonderry. 


Wm. Sherburn, 






a 


Londonderry, 


Samuel Marshall, 






a 


Windham. 


Aaron Senter, 






n 


Windham. 


Solomon Corliss, 






a 


Windham. 


John Webster, 






11 


Windham. 


Ebenezer Fogg, 






11 


Deerfield. 


Samuel Chase, 


2 


[ 


a 


Salem. 


John Palmer, 






a 


Salem. 


Asa Silver, 






a 


Salem. 


Isaac Clough, 
John Hazeltine, 






a 


Salem. 






n 


Salem. 


Josiah Coburn, 






a 


Londonderry. 


Jonathan Kelsey, 






" 


Londonderry. 


David Adams, 






" 


Londonderry. 


David Bladgen, jr., 






<( 


Deerfield. 


William Rand, 






tt 


Deerfield. 


John Langley, 






a 


Deerfield. 


Reuben Prescott, 






a 


Deerfield. 


John Cotton, Waiter, 






K 




Benj. Hazeltine, " 






" 




James Dalton, 






" 


Deerfield. 



990 



adjutant-general s report. 
Eoll of Capt. Josiah Bellows's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. iFor what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Josiah Bellows, Captain, 


Sept. 26, 1814 


Sixty days 


Walpole. 


Lewis Hunt, Lieutenant, 




" , Charlestown. 


Joel Howe, " 




(< 


Henniker. 


Isaac Gerrish, " 




" 


Boscawen. 


Eoyal Bellows, Q. M. Serg't, 




" 


Oharlestown. 


Nath'l Chapin, Clerk, 




" 


Walpole. 


Levi Abbott, Sergeant, 




" 


Charlestown. 


Daniel Hubbard, •' 




" 


Walpole. 


Eben'r Wilson, " 




ec 


Weare. 


Isaac Hadley, " 




" 


Peterborough. 


Enoch Hoyt, " 




it 


Bradford. 


James Boyd, " 




a 


Henniker. 


John Chi Ids, " 




" 


Plainfield. 


Stephen Tiffany, Corporal, 




" 


Walpole. 


Nathan Putnam, " 




" 


Charlestown. 


Peter Burns, " 




" 


Milford. 


Erastus Woodard, " 




u 


Plainfield. 


James Priest, Fifer, 




u 


Walpole. 


Perley Howe, Drummer, 




" 


Henniker. 


Jesse "Jackman, " 




« 


Boscawen. 


PRIVATES. 








Elisha Anger, 


Sept. 26,1814 


Sixty days 


Walpole. 


Ephraim Holland, 






Walpole. 


Ziba Lowell, 






Walpole. 


Israel Brown, 






Walpole. 


John Griggs, 






Walpole. 


David Perkins, 






Walpole. 


Samuel Buggies, 






Walpole. 


Abel Page, 






Walpole. Discharged No 


Ransom Lawrence, 






Walpole. [7, 181 


William Johnson, 






Walpole. Discharged No 


Nathan Conant, 






Walpole. [5, 181 


Benj. Miller, 






Walpole. 


Gordon Beckwith, 






Walpole. 


Thomas Nichols, jr., 






Walpole. 


William Willington, 






Walpole. 


Eben'r Watkins, 






Waipole. 


Fred Scovell, 






Walpole. 


Alfred Priest, 






Walpole. 


James Sturtevant, 






Walpole. 


John Bundy, 






Walpole. 


Carlton Wire, 






Walpole. 


John Marshall, 






Walpole. 


Edmund P. Davis, 






Walpole. 


Samuel A. Wightman, 






Walpole. 


Seth Hart, 






Charlestown. 


Samuel Y. Carlisle, 






Charlestown. 


Alpheus Watkins, 






Charlestown. 


Joel Adams, 






Charlestown. 


Willard Powers, 






Charlestown. 


Sylvester Powers, 






Charlestown. 


Joseph Simons, 






Charlestown. 


Henry Baldwin, 






Charlestown. 


James Labaree, 






Charlestown. 


John Dinsmore, 






Charlestown. 


Ephraim Putnam, 






Charlestown. 


Willard Henry, 






Charlestown. 


Leonard Osgood, 






Charlestown. 


Lewis Huntoon, 






Charlestown. 


Wilber Andrews, 






Charlestown. 


William Alexander, 






Plainfield. 


John Ashby, 






Plainfield. 


Ephraim Dunlap, 






Plainfield. 


Daniel C. Gates, 






Plainfield. 


Elisha Sawyer, 






Plainfield. 


Charles Spaulding, 






Plainfield. 


David Westgate, 






Plainfield. 


John Ash, 






Boscawen. 


James Connor, 






Boscawen. 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 223 

Eoll op Capt. Bellows's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Benjamin Colby, 


Sept. 26,1814 


Sixty days 


Boscawen. 


Herman Davis, 


a 






Boscawen. 


Jesse Floyd, 


a 






Boscawen. 


John- Hanscomb, 


" 






Boscawen. 


Job Nichols, 


" 






Boscawen. 


Levi Barnes, 


it 






Henniker. 


Benjamin Cook, 


« 






Henniker. 


Samuel Clark, 


a 






Henniker. 


Wm. Livingston, jr., 


" 






Henniker. 


Adam Stewart, 


H 






Henniker. 


Joseph Stewart, 


it 






Henniker. 


Titus D. Wadswortb, 


ti 






Henniker. 


Joel Wood, 


(( 






Henniker. 


Jacob Barrett, ■ 


« 






Weare. 


Roberc Clougb, 


" 






Weare. 


Nathan Cram, 


(i 






Weare. 


Nathan Johnson, 


!< 






Weare. 


John Sprague, 


" 






Joined Oct. 3, 1814. 


Armanda Sprague, 


'• 






Joined Oct. 3, 1814. 


Aaron White, 


« 






Joined Oct. 3, 1814. 


James Brown, 


" 






West Nottingham. 


Joseph Blood, 


it 






Dunstable. 


John Courey, 


(( 






Dunstable. 


James Blanchard, 


" 






Milford. 


Joel Carter, 


it 






Hillsborough. 


Phineas Cummins, 


a 






Hollis. 


Daniel Lawrence, jr., 


a 






Hollis. 


David Evans, 


" 






Peterborough. 


Andrew Holmes, 


" 






Peterborough. 


Samuel Pettis, 


•' 






Peterborough. 


Amiel Foster, 


.« 






Greenfield. 


Whitcomb May, 


a 






Greenfield. 


John Robinson, 


a 






Greenfield. 


David Harver, 


a 






Warner. 


Samuel Page, 


a 






Warner. 


Benjamin Spaulding, 


a 






Warner. 


Daniel Wheeler, 


u 






Warner. 


John Merrill, jr., 


" 






West Nottingham. 


Michajah Moore, 


" 






Mont Vernon. 


Isaac Walker, 


a 






Bradford. 


Jonathan P. Sanborn, 


a 






Salisbury. 


Jesse Stone, 


" 






Plainfield. 


Simon Flood, 


" 






Boscawen. 


John Graves, Servant, 


« 






Walpole. 


Nath Nutter, 


«< 






Henniker. 



2 2 4: adjutant-general's report. 

Pay Eoll of Lieut. Nathaniel Burley's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


To what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Nath'l Burley, Lieutenant, 


Oct. 1, 1814 


Sixty days 


Sandwich. Joined Oct. 6, 


Thomas Roby, Sergeant 


Sept. 29 




Plymouth. [1814. 


Arch. McMurphy, Corporal, 


" 




Rumney. 


Aaron Bennett, " 


a 




New Durham. 


John Coleman, Fifer, 


a 




New Durham. 


Joshua Smith, Drummer, 


a 




Sanborn ton. 


PRIVATES. 








Ezra H. Haines, 


Sept. 29, 1814 




Rumney. 


John Fuller, 


a 




Plymouth. Sick in hospital 


John Tilton, 


Oct. 1 




Sandwich. 


Amos Piper, 


Sept. 29 




Rumney. 


Laban Hies, 


it 




Plymouth. 


Nathaniel Ethridge, 


Oct. 1 




Sandwich. 


Timothy Peasly, 


<< 




Sandwich. 


Levi Leach, 


Sept. 23 




Bath. Confined. 


John Donovan, 


Oct. 1 




Sandwich. 


John Hackett, 


" 




Sandwich. 


John Moulton, 


a 




Sandwich. 


Jedecliah Skinner, 


a 




Sandwich. 


Nathan Weeks, 


a 




Hanover. 


Henry Hutchinson, 


li 




Gilmanton. 


John Cox, 3d, 


Sept. 26 




Holderness. 


John Smith, 


Oct. 1 




Sandwich. 


Nathan Davis, 


Sept. 29 




Hanover. 


John P. Butler, 


Oct. 1 




Campton. 


Ebenezer Baker, 


Sept. 26 




Holderness. 


Thomas Watkins, Servant. 


Oct. 6 




Portsmouth. 



military history op new-hampshire. 225 

Roll op Capt. Reuben Hayes's Company. 



Reuben Hayes, Captain, 
Alfred Smith, 1st Lieut., 
Josiah Parsons, 2d Lieut., 
Thomas Tashys 2d Lieut., 
Jacob Noyes, 3d Lieut., 
Benj. Swan, Quart'r Serg't 
Isaac Scales, Sergeant, 
Baily Weed, " 

Nath'l Roberts, " 
Benj. Bennett, " 
Nicholas Grace, " 
David Durgin, Corporal, 
Samuel Smith, " 
Amos Kent, 
Peter Rodimon, " 
David Corliss, " 
Samuel Stevens, " 
B. L. Boardman, " 
Samuel Ladd, " 
Francis Flanders, Musician 
Joseph Berry, 
Asa Davis, 
Scott Jameson, " 

PRIVATES. 

Win. Davis, 
Lucas Hagar, 
Nath'l Olmstead, 
Paul M. Runnels, 
David Burnham, 
Smith Ladd, 
Ephraim Chamberlain, 
Isaac Kelley, 
Daniel Hoit, 
John Chamberlain, 
John Rowel, 
Isaac Moore, 
Asa Libbey, 
James Brown, 
Jona. Fellows, 
John Herd, 
John Merrill, 
John Kimball, 
Hugh Talford, 
Samuel Hartshorn, 
Emidore Roberts, 
Stephen T. Davis, 
Edmund Tibbetts, 
Reuben Simons, 
John Fitield, 
Asa Darling, 
Josiah Osgood, 
Benj. Berry, 
James Rogers, 
Wm. Chamberlain, 
John Webster, 
Jacob Bennett, 
Daniel Pinkham, 
Amos H. Jones, 
Henry Moore, 
John Baily, 
Walter Melville, 
John Taylor, 
Moses Fabor, 
Isaac Elliot, 
Simon Tuttle, 
James Knight, 
William Tole_, 
John Smith, jr., 
Page Gould, 

15 



Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 



3, 1814 
29 
3 



Sixty days 



Oct. 3, 1814 



Sixty days 



New Durham. 

New Durham. 

Gilmanton. 

New Durham. 

Landaff. 

Haverhill. 

Hanover. 

Sandwich. 

Alton. 

Alton. 

New Durham. 

New Durham. 

Haverhill. 

Piermont. 

Piermont. 

Bridgewater. 

Hanover. 

Bridgewater. 

Piermont. 

Bath. 

New Durham. 

New Durham. 

Concord. 



New Durham. 

Bath. 

Lyman. 

New Durham. 

Gilmanton. 

Piermont. 

New Durham. 

Bath. 

New Chester. 

New Durham. 

New Chester. 

Bath. 

New Durham. 

Bath. 

Bridgewater. 

New Durham. 

Lyman. 

Bath. 

Dan bury. 

Hebron. 

Piermont. 

New Durham, 

New Durham. 

Piermont. 

Bridgewater. 

Hanover. 

Gilford. 

New Durham. 

Alton. 

New Durham. 

New Durham. 

Gilmanton. 

Gilmanton. 

Haverhill. 

Piermont. 

Piermont. 

oton. 
Danbury. 
Danbury. 
Groton. 
Franconia. 
Hanover. 
Hanover. 
Hanover. 
Hanover. 



Dis'd Nov. 
[12, 1814. 



226 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Hayes's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


Lewis Gould, 


Oct. 3, 1814 


Sixty days 


Hanover. 


Adolphus Hughes, 


" 




Hanover. 


John D. Sandborn, 


" 




Gilford. 


John Bennett, jr., 


a 




Gilmanton. 


Daniel G. Morrill, 


a 




Gilmanton. 


John Allen, 


u 


" Gilmanton. 


Isaac Beedle, 


" 


" Gilmanton. 


James Elkins, 


(( 


" Gilmanton. 


Richard Elkins, jr., 


" 


" jGilmanton. 


Wm. Mousey, jr., 


" 


" Barnstead. 


Jeremiah Avery, 


(i 


** Barnstead. 


Wm. Lord, jr., 


<« 




Barnstead. 


Nathan Collins, 


a 




Barnstead. 


Ephraim Pickering, 


" 




Barnstead. 


James Allen, jr., 


<( 




Gilmanton. 


Niel McGaffee, 


" 




Sandwich. 


Jona. Dearborn, 


(< 


* fi 


Plymouth. 


Peter Draper, 


<( 




Plymouth. 


David Willey, jr., 


" 




New Durham. 


Elial Stewart, 


a 




Alton. 


Jacob Leighton, 


" 




New Durham. 


Samuel Davis, 


" 




New Durham. 


John Davis, 


a 




New Durham. 


George Durgin, 


n 




New Durham. 


Samuel Kennison, 


" 




New Durham. 


John Willey, 


" 




New Durham. 


Henry Rogers, 


" 




Alton. 


Jacob Tash, 


<( 




New Durham. 


David Davis, 


'« 




New Durham. 


Jona. Soames, 


16 




Sanbornton. 


Nathan T. Moore, 




" jSanbornton. 


Jona. Baily, 


« 


" Sanbornton. 


James P. Tilton, 


«< 


•« Sanbornton. 


John Blake, 


M 


" JSanbornton. 


Wm. Chase, 


" 


" Sanbornton. Disch'd No - * 


Nathan Huse, 


" 


" Sanbornton. [3, 181 


Levi Conner, 


" 


" Sanbornton. 


Walker Ruzzell, 


(( 


" Sanbornton. 


Henry Sanborn, 


(( 


" Sanbornton. 


William Durgin, 


«( 


" [Sanbornton. 


Caleb Ames, 


(( 


" New Hampton. 


Wm. Hayes, jr., 


" 


" ISanbornton. 


Moses Rollins, 


<« 


" Sanbornton. 


Stephen S. Magoon, 


" 


" New Hampton. 


Obadiah C. Smith, 


" 


" New Hampton. 


Fiske Hibbard, 


" 


" New Hampton. 


Wm. Drake, 


" 


" INew Hampton. 


Israel Huckins, 


" 


" New Hampton. 


Robert Walker, 


Oct. 3 




Alton. 


Samuel Odiorne, 


« 






Samuel Chase, 


" 






Joseph Odiorne, 


" 







The battalion of artillery under Col. Long was stationed 
at Fort Washington. 

These detached troops were very judiciously posted ir 
case of an attack. The guard or companies stationed al 
Jaffrey's Point, at the battery commanding the entrance tc 
Little Harbor, was a sufficient protection at that port ; whik 
Forts Constitution and McClary, with " Walbach's Tower, ,; 
filled with regulars and militia under the gallant Wal- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 227 

bach, were considered amply sufficient to prevent any armed 
vessels from entering the Piscataqua River. But, in case 
they should pass those forts, Forts Washington and Sullivan 
at "The Narrows," with a full complement of men, were 
thought sufficient to stay the further progress of the enemy. 
Then, if the enemy should pass the battery commanding 
Little Harbor and should succeed in approaching the south 
part of the town, the regiments of Colonels Waldron and 
Lovering, with sundry pieces of artillery, were posted at the 
"South Ropewalk" to meet them. Then Major Sias, with 
his regiment, comprising three companies of infantry and 
three companies of artillery, was posted at " The Plains," 
commanding the road from Greenland and Rye ; so that, 
should the enemy have effected a landing at Hampton or 
Rye as was anticipated, their entrance into Portsmouth 
landward would have been stayed, whilst the thousands of 
troops from the river could have come to their assistance. 
Of this large detached force, Gov. Gilman took the com- 
mand in person, and, with his staff, was watchful of every 
point, and most assiduous in his labors to prepare a vigorous 
reception for the enemy. His staff consisted of — 

George Sullivan,* ^ 
Bradbury Cilley ,f I Aides- 
Edward J. Long, 
Daniel Gookin, J 

* Col. George Sullivan was the son of Gen. John Sullivan, and was born in Durham, 
Aug. 29, 1771. He graduated at Harvard University in 1790. "He studied law in 
the office of Judge Steele in Durham, and commenced practice at Exeter in 1793. 
In 1805 he was a member of the State Legislature. In 1811, while pursuing a very 
extensive and lucrative practice, he was elected to Congress, which office he held two 
years. In 1813 he was again elected a Representative to the State Legislature, and, 
in 1814 and 1815, was a member of the State Senate. In 1814 he was appointed an 
Aide-de-camp^ by Gov. Gilman, which office he held until June, 1816. In Decem- 
ber, 1805, he was appointed to the office of Attorney-General of the State, upon the 
resignation of the Hon. Jeremiah Mason, but resigned it in about two years. In 1816, 

t Col. Bradbury Cilley was of Nottingham, the son of Gen. Joseph Cilley, of that 
town. He was born Feb. 1, 1760. Col. Cilley was not much in public life, preferring 
the pursuits of a private citizen. He was elected a Representative to the United States 
House of Representatives in 1813, and served one term. In 1814 he was appointed as 
above by Gov. Gilman, upon his staff, and served in that capacity two years, being on 
active duty in the fall of 1814. He was a man of large wealth, and died at Nottingham, 
Dec. 17, 1831, in the seventy-second year of his age. 



228 adjutant-general's report. 

He himself was educated in the school of the Revolution ; 
and, the 12th of September, after issuing the general 
order for detaching these troops, he appointed Capt. Daniel 
Gookin* who had had a long experience in that same 
school, one of his Aides. Capt. Gookin was an excellent disci- 
plinarian as well as tactician, and he rendered most efficient 
aid in organizing the troops. Portsmouth and its harbor 
thus protected, the enemy thought it too hazardous to at- 
tempt an attack upon it, as they had intended. f 

The danger being past, the British forces evidently ex- 
tended their predatory warfare southward. The main part 
of the troops, detached for the protection of Portsmouth, 
were discharged about the 1st of October. A small detach- 
ment of troops still remained, however, until winter 
approached. 

There were other officers detached and present at Ports- 
mouth, but were without any commands ; at least, if they 
had any, the rolls of their troops have not been found. I 
am inclined to the opinion that they were supernumeraries, 
detached for the purpose of looking after the troops in 
their regiments or brigades. 

lie was appointed to the same office, which he held until 1835, when he resigned it, in 
consequence of the law prohibiting the Attorney-General from engaging in civil suits 
in the courts. He early acquired a high position at the New-Hampshire bar, and, for 
more than forty years, was actively engaged in practice. As a professional lawyer, he 
had few equals in the country. His mind was of a high order, vigorous, discriminat- 
ing, and philosophical. He did not rely, however, upon his strong native genius for 
eminence in his profession, but upon unremitted application to the study of the law as 
a science. Among the learned jurists who have at different periods adorned the Xew- 
Hampshire bar, he held perhaps the highest rank as an able and eloquent advocate. 
He died June 14, 1838, in the sixty-seventh year of his age." [J. C Ajiory, Esq , in 
" Genealogical Register."] 

* For notice of Capt. Gookin, see vol. ii., 1866, p. 361. 

t The British had made every arrangement to destroy the Navy Vard and the town 
of Portsmouth. For this purpose their cruisers were off the bay of Piscataqua. A 
British officer told Col. Walbach, after the war, that he went up the Piscataqua and 
reconnoitred the town, disguised as a fisherman, and returned to the fleet and report- 
ed that the town was swarming with soldiers and well defended; and the British com- 
mander abandoned the project of attacking the town. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 229 

Such officers were — 

Henry Sweetser,* Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Simon W. Baldwin, Adjutant. 
Jonathan Twombly, Surgeon's Mate. 
Thomas Towne, Acting Quartermaster. 
John B. Osborn, Sergeant-Major. 
Samuel M. Richardson,! Major. 
Joshua G. Hall, Major. 

The campaign of 1814, as carried on by the national 
forces, commenced with disaster. In early spring, Gen. 
Wilkinson, with a part of the Northern army, crossed into 
Canada, and was repulsed at a stone mill on the La Colle 
River, with considerable loss. 

On the 1st of July, Gen. Brown, with an army 3,000 
strong, crossed the Niagara and took possession of Fort 
Erie without opposition. A British army of about the 
same number, under Gen. Riall, was entrenched on the 
Chippewa River, only a few miles distant. The plains 
of Chippewa are situated upon a peninsula formed by the 
Chippewa and Niagara Rivers, and a sluggish stream called 
Street's Creek. The course of the Niagara east of the 
peninsula is north ; whilst the Chippewa and Street's Creek 
empty into the Niagara from the west, nearly at right 
angles to it, and from four hundred to five hundred rods 
apart, — thus forming a peninsula, its eastern part lying upon 
the Niagara, being in the form somewhat of a parallelogram. 
Both the Chippewa and Street's Creek were bridged a short 
distance above their union with the Niagara. 



* The same mentioned on p. 391, vol. ii. 18G6. He was engaged in mercantile pursuits. 
He was repeatedly Representative from Chester, where he resided. He was Major of 
the First Battalion of the Seventeenth Regiment from 1806 to 1813, when he became 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the same; and was Quartermaster-General from 1817 to 1820. 
He died in Concord Jan. 28, 1847, aged seventy-eight years. 

f Samuel M. Richardson was of Pelham, where he was a well-known farmer. He 
was Major of the Second Battalion of the Eighth Regiment in 1814 and 1815; Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the same in 1816 and 1817, and Colonel in 1818 and 1819. He was appointed 
Brigadier-General of the Third Brigade in 1819, and resigned in 1820. He was Senator 
from the Third Senatorial District in 1821, and represented his town in the Legislature 
in 1830, and again in 1835. He was a brother of Chief Justice William M. Richardson, 
deceased ; was a man of integrity, and commanded the respect of all who knew him. 
He died at Pelham March 11, 1859, aged eighty-two years. 



230 adjutant-general's report- 

The brigade under Gen. Scott, consisting of the Ninth, 
Eleventh, and Twenty-fifth Regiments, and a detachment of 
the Twenty-second and a corps of artillery, was ordered by 
Maj.-Gen. Brown, on the morning of the 4th of July, 1814, 
to advance from Fort Erie to the Chippewa ; while he should 
bring up the rear, after leaving the Fort protected by a proper 
force. The troops advanced with the greatest alacrity, antici- 
pating a meeting with the enemy. The heat was oppressive, 
and it was with the greatest difficulty that the troops could be 
restrained from indulging in over-draughts of water. Yet 
they pressed on, crossed Street's Creek, the light troops of 
the enemy retiring before them, and, advancing upon the 
south bank of the Chippewa, through a piece of woods, dis- 
covered the enemy in force upon the opposite bank, pro- 
tected by a temporary fortification. After some skirmishing 
with the light troops of the enemy, the day far spent, Gen. 
Scott recrossed Street's Creek and encamped for the night, 
to await the arrival of the rest of the troops ; a part of 
which came into camp about eleven o'clock at night, under 
Gen. Brown, consisting of the Second Brigade, under Gen. 
Ripley, the field and battering train, and a corps of artillery 
under Maj. Winsman. These were followed in the morn- 
ing by Gen. Porter with the New York and Pennsylvania 
militia and the warriors of the " Six Nations." Early in 
the morning of the 5th, the enemy sent out their skirmish- 
ers, attacked our pickets, and kept up a desultory fire upon 
our advanced parties during the day, until about four o'clock 
in the afternoon. At this time Gen. Porter advanced with 
the militia and Indians, from the left and rear of the 
American lines, through the woods towards the Chippewa ; 
Gen. Brown ordering the advance to retire slowly under 
the fire of the enemy's advance parties. This manoeuvre 
was for the purpose of cutting off the enemy's skirmishers. 
Gen. Porter soon met the enemy's skirmishers in the 
woods, and, driving them before him, advanced near to the 
Chippewa, where he discovered the entire British force, 
drawn up in order of battle, in open ground upon the south 
side of the river. The enemy immediately advanced from 






MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 231 

behind the wood, and displayed his columns upon the open 
plains, at the same time keeping up a heavy fire upon Gen. 
Porter's force. At this time Gen. Brown ordered Scott to 
advance with his brigade and Towson's artillery, and meet 
the enemy. The order was promptly and gallantly execu- 
ted. Towson's Battery, of three guns, crossed the bridge, 
advanced down the Niagara a short distance from the 
bridge, took position, and opened a brisk fire upon the 
enemy's line, in order to cover Gen. Scott's advance across 
the bridge. Maj. Leavenworth, at the head of the Ninth 
and Twenty-second, led the column ; Col. Campbell, in com- 
mand of the Eleventh, occupied the centre; and the Twenty- 
fifth, under command of Maj. Jessup, brought up the rear 
of the column. Upon crossing, Maj. Leavenworth took 
position in front of the enemy's left by an advance down the 
river ; Col. Campbell, with the Eleventh, advanced to form 
at his left and nearly opposite the enemy's centre ; and Maj. 
Jessup, with the Twenty-fifth, advanced by an oblique move- 
ment through the wood, to form upon the left of the line, and 
attack the enemy's right. Soon after crossing the bridge, 
Col. Campbell, in command of the Eleventh, fell, and the 
command of the regiment devolved upon Maj. McNeil. 
McNeil took the head of his regiment with alacrity. The 
Ninth formed with precision, and, advancing, received and 
returned the fire of the enemy with spirit. The Eleventh 
formed on their left under the command of Maj. McNeil, and 
advanced at shouldered arms and with quick step, leaving 
the Ninth to the right and in rear, until it was within fifteen 
rods of the enemy's line, receiving a heavy fire from the 
enemy, during the entire advance, without wavering or 
breaking. The Eleventh then opened a most destructive 
fire upon the British line, and at the same time were sup- 
ported by a deadly fire from the Twenty-fifth, under Maj. 
Jessup, who had obtained an advanced position. The enemy 
stood this fire but for a moment, when they rushed on to 
charge the Ninth, which was in their front, and not yet up 
to a line with the Eleventh Regiment. This movement 
of the enemy would have carried them directly past the 






232 adjutant-general's report. 

Eleventh, but, as they were executing it, Maj. McNeil, 
seizing his advantage, gave the command, " Eleventh form 
line to the front on the right platoon." The order was 
executed immediately, and the regiment poured a deadly 
flank fire into the ranks of the charging enemy. Thus 
hotly pressed in flank and front, the British column 
wavered, broke, and fled, and the utmost efforts of their 
officers could not rally them. The rout became general ; 
and the enemy did not stop in their precipitate flight until 
they had gained the protection of their fortifications, and 
their batteries had checked the ardent pursuit of the Amer- 
ican troops. In this important battle there cannot be a 
doubt of the fact that the flank movement of the Eleventh 
Regiment, under the command of the gallant McNeil, turned 
the fortune of the day, and gave the victory to the American 
troops. 

This decisive victory greatly revived the spirits of the 
American people ; and another that soon followed convinced 
them that all our soldiers wanted was leaders, to make us 
as successful upon land as upon the ocean. 

Soon after the battle of Chippewa, the British General 
abandoned his works, and returned with his army to Bur- 
lington Heights. There he was re-enforced by Lieut.-Gen. 
Drummond, who took command of the army and led it 
back towards the American camp. 

In a hasty report of the battle of Chippewa made to the 
Secretary of War, the 6th of July, 1814, Gen. Brown said : 
u The wounded of the enemy and of our own army must be 
attended to ; they will be removed to Buffalo, which, with 
my limited means of transportation, will require a day or 
two. This done, I shall advance, not doubting but that the 
gallant and accomplished troops I lead will break down all 
opposition between me and Lake Ontario, when, if the fleet 
meet us, all is well ; and, if not, under the favor of Heaven, 
we will so behave as to avoid disgrace." But the fleet was 
not in a situation to act in an emergency, as, down to the 
20th of July, it was in port, and the Commodore sick of a 
fever. Under such circumstances, Gen. Brown's position 
was anything but pleasant. However, he made the most of 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 233 

it ; and, anticipating no co-operation on the part of the fleet, 
he determined to rely upon his own resources, and push his 
little army forward to Burlington Heights. To mask his 
purpose, and to draw a supply of provision from Schlosser, he 
fell back upon the Chippewa River. In this position, about 
noon of the 25th of July, Gen. Brown received intelligence 
that the enemy appeared in considerable force at Queens- 
town, and that four vessels of the British fleet had arrived 
the preceding night and were lying near Fort Niagara. 
Soon after, intelligence came that the enemy were landing 
at Lewistown, and that our stores at Schlosser were in dan- 
ger. At this crisis, Gen. Brown determined at once to 
march his force towards Queenstown, as this movement 
would doubtless recall the enemy's troops to the west side 
of the Niagara, and thus divert them from any serious at- 
tempt upon Lewistown or Schlosser. Gen. Scott, with the 
First Brigade, Towson's Artillery, and all the dragoons and 
mounted men, was put in motion forthwith, to march on the 
road towards Queenstown, with orders to report if the 
enemy appeared, and to call for assistance if necessary. 
Gen. Scott pushed on his command with vigor, and, 
upon his arrival at the Falls, found the enemy, under 
Gen. Riall, directly in front, behind a narrow strip of wood, 
and in line of battle upon Lundy's Lane, — a ridge of land 
nearly at right angles with the Niagara, and about a mile 
below the Falls. Gen. Scott sent information to Gen. 
Brown, and at once commenced an impetuous attack upon 
the enemy. Maj. McNeil, at the head of the gallant Eleventh, 
had the honor of leading the brigade into action. The ad- 
vance commenced skirmishing about half past 5, p.m., but 
the action did not commence in earnest until near 7, p.m. 
The British were in much larger force, and the^ were able 
to extend their lines much farther, and to make flank move- 
ments. To counteract this advantage, our troops fought in 
detachments and charged in column. After the first attack, 
the troops, under their intrepid leaders, seem to have fought 
pretty much upon their own responsibility, until Gen. Brown 
came up with the remainder of the forces. The enemy's 



234 

left was upon a road parallel to the Niagara, with a wooc 
some two hundred yards in width intervening betwixt it anc 
the river. Maj. Jessup took advantage of the enemy'* 
position, and upon his own responsibility led his regimem 
through the wood, turned the enmey's left, took Gen. Rial 
and some of his principal officers prisoners, and, charging 
back, regained his position in gallant style. Meantime th( 
enemy, outflanking our troops upon their left, sent a battal- 
ion to attack them in the rear. This movement was noticec 
by Maj. McNeil, and he promptly met and repelled i 
with the Eleventh, driving the enemy with great slaugh 
ter. Col. Brady with the Twenty-second, and Towsoi 
with his artillery, did good service upon the centre and kep 
the enemy in check. Thus the contest raged for an hour 
the British infantry driven at every point by turns, bu 
holding their position through a powerful battery of tw< 
twenty-fours, four sixes, and three howitzers, planted upoi 
a rising ground commanding the field. This battery hac 
kept up an incessant and destructive fire from the com 
mencement of the action. At this crisis the combatants 
enveloped in smoke and mad with excitement, were greetec 
with a tremendous cheer ; and cheer followed cheer. I 
was Ripley's Brigade rushing to the fight. Scott's Brigad( 
paused in their excitement, and, as the third cheer echoec 
across the Niagara, they returned them with three as hearty 
if not as loud, and then commenced again the work of death 
Ripley's Brigade had formed for evening parade, when th( 
booming of cannon and the report of small-arms announcec 
that Scott had found the enemy. Gen. Brown orderec 
them to move immediately, and followed himself with Por 
ter's Brigade. Ripley's Brigade marched at quick step : bu 
the quick* step, such was the ardor of the troops, soor 
passed into a rush, and they actually ran the three mile* 
betwixt the camp and the battle-field. It was with this 
ardor and excitement that Ripley's Brigade raised the cheer* 
upon seeing their friends at Niagara. Animated by this 
opportune arrival, both brigades rushed to the attack witl 
the greatest impetuosity. But the battery upon the hii 
made tremendous havoc among our troops. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 235 

At this time Maj. McNeil's horse was killed under him 
)y a cannon-ball, and himself wounded in the leg by a can- 
ster-shot, a six-ounce ball passing through his right knee, 
nattering the bone severely and nearly carrying away the 
mtire limb. He, however, continued in the conflict. Gen. 
^rter's troops had now arrived, and Gen. Brown took 
ommand in person. He at once saw that the British bat- 
ery must be carried to ensure success ; and, turning to the 
;allant Miller, who commanded the Twenty-first, he or- 
tered Col. Miller to storm the battery. " I'll try, sir," 
ras the laconic reply. Of the contest that followed, let 
he gallant Colonel himself give an account : — 

Fort Erie, July 28, 1814. 

" On the evening of the 25th instant, at the falls of the Niagara, 
ve met the enemy, and had, I believe, one of the most desperately 
ought actions ever experienced in America ; it continued for more 
han three hours, stubbornly contested on both sides, when, about 
en o'clock at night, we succeeded in driving them from their 
trong position. Our loss was very severe in killed and wounded. 

have lost from my regiment, in killed, wounded, and missing, 
ne hundred and twenty-six. The enemy had got their artillery 
tosted on a height, in a very commanding position, where they 
ould rake our columns in any part of the plain, and prevented 
heir advancing. Maj. McRae, the chief engineer, told Gen. 
Jrown lie could do no good until that height was carried, and 
hose cannon taken, or driven from their position. It was then 
vening, but moonlight. Gen. Brown turned to me and said: 
Col. Miller, take your regiment and storm that work and take 
b.' I had short of three hundred men with me, as my regiment 
iad been much weakened by the numerous details made from it 
luring the day. I, however, immediately obeyed the order. "We 
ould see all their slow-matches and port-fires burning and ready. 

did not know what side of the work was the most favorable of 
pproach, but happened to hit upon a very favorable place, not- 
withstanding we advanced upon the mouths of their pieces of 
annon. It happened there was an old rail-fence on the side 
rhere we approached, undiscovered by the enemy, with a small 
,Towth of shrubbery by the fence, and within less than two rods 
f the cannon's mouth. I then very cautiously ordered my men 
o rest across the fence, take good aim, fire, and rush, which was 
lone in style. Not one man at the cannons was left to put fire to 
hem. We got into the centre of their park before they had time 



236 adjutant-general's report. 

to oppose us. A British line was formed, and lying in a stroi 
position to protect their artillery: the moment we got to t] 
centre, they opened a most destructive flank flre on us, killed 
great many, and attempted to charge with their bayonets. 1 
returned the fire so warmly they were compelled to stand. "V 
fought hand to hand for some time, so close that the blaze of o 
guns crossed each other ; but we compelled them to abandon the 
whole artillery, ammunition, wagons, and all, amounting to sevi 
pieces of elegant brass cannon, one of which was a twenty-foi 
pounder, with eight horses and harnesses, though some of t 
horses were killed. The British made two more attempts 
charge us at close quarters, both of which we repulsed before 
was re-enforced, after which the First and Twenty-third Re| 
ments came to my relief; and, even after that, the British chargi 
with their whole line three several times, and, after getting with 
half pistol-shot of us, were compelled to give way. I took, wi 
my regiment, between thirty and forty prisoners, while takh 
and defending the artillery. Lieut. Aaron Bigelow of my reg 
ment was killed, Capt. Burbank and Lieut. Cilley* badly wounde 
a number of others slightly; Gen. Brown and his aide both da 
gerously wounded; Gen. Scott and his Brigade-Major, Liei 
Smith, both badly wounded; Gen. Ripley and his aide both sh 
through the hat; Maj. McFarland killed; Col. Brady bad 
wounded; Maj. McNeil badly wounded, so he must, it is sai 

* Lieut. Joseph Cilley was from Nottingham, the son of Greenleaf Cilley and Jer 
Neally Cilley. He was horn Jan. 4, 1791. His first commission was that of I 
sign in the First Company of Infantry in the Eighteenth Regiment, from Gov. Jo 
Langdon, under date of Oct. 17, 1811. March 12, 1812, he was appointed an Ensign 
Infantry in the United States Army, and was ordered for duty in Capt. John McClar 
company, Eleventh Regiment United States Infantry, then commanded by Col. Isa 
Clarke, of Vermont. He was afterwards promoted to Lieutenant, March 17, 18 
transferred to the Twenty-first United States Infantry, commanded by Col. Miller, a 
was in the battle of Chippewa. In the battle of Bridgewater, or " Lundy'sLane," hew 
wounded, as named above, by a musket-ball in the thigh, producing a compou 
fracture of the thigh bone. He was soon after promoted to a captaincy for his gallanl 
in that battle. He was in the battle of Chrystler's Fields on the St. Lawrence, a 
served through the war with distinction. He was retained in the army on the pet 
establishment, but resigned his commission in July, 1816. On the 20th of June, 18 
he was commissioned as Quartermaster of the First Division of New-Hampsh 
Militia, by <$rOv. Plumer, upon Maj. -Gen. Clement Storer's staff, and Division Inspeci 
upon Gen^Sorer's staff in 1821 by Gov. Samuel Boles. In 1827 he was appointed 
aide upon the staff of Gov. Benjamin Pierce. In 1846 he was elected by the Legis 
ture to the United States Senate, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of t 
Hon. Levi Woodbury. Upon the close of his Senatorial term, Col. Cilley returned 
his farm in Nottingham. There he remains, in the quiet enjoyment of a competem 
with the reputation of a brave and gallant soldier, an upright and honorable man, a 
the respect of his fellow-men. Although in the seventy-eighth year of his age, C 
Cilley writes a fair, legible, business hand, and is of such bodily activity that, t 
past season, he acted as pioneer for a railroad committee on looking out a route foi 
contemplated road through Nottingham, and pointed out to them the curiosity of Pa 
tuckaway Lake, that has two outlets, both discharging their waters into the Lanrpr 
River. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 237 

;e Ms leg. It is unnecessary for me to enumerate a quarter 
our loss, but we have very few officers left for duty. I now 
mmand a brigade. Gen. Ripley is Commander-in-chief. I am 
3 only full colonel, and we have but one lieutenant-colonel left 
all the regular troops here. We expect re-enforcements soon. 
Lt I forgot to tell you we were unfortunate about our artillery 
last. After Generals Brown, Scott, and others were wounded, 
5 were ordered to return back to our camp, about three miles, 
d preparations had not been made for taking off the cannon, 
was impossible for me to defend it and make preparations for 
it too ; and it was all left upon the ground, except one beautiful 
ass six-pounder, which is made a present to my regiment in 
timony of their distinguished gallantry. . . . We wounded 
ij.-Gen. Drummond, took Maj.-Gen. Riall prisoner, with be- 
een twenty and thirty other officers ; how many non-commis- 
ned officers and privates, I have not yet learned, as they were 
it hastily across the river, but a very considerable number." * 

This was one of the most sanguinary battles of the war, 
d showed the decided superiority of the American troops ; 
the enemy were upon their own ground, chose their posi- 
n, had a battery superior in number and weight of metal, 
d were greatly superior in numbers. 
The gallant act of Col. Miller and the noble Twenty-first 
igiment, in storming the battery, was the admiration of 
3ry one. The British officers taken as prisoners, and vet- 
ins in service, united in saying it was the most desperate 
air they ever witnessed. Gen. Brown well knew the 
sperate service he was about to send Miller upon, as, the 
st time he met him after the battle, he said, " My dear 
low, my heart ached for you when I gave you that order, 
t it was the only thing that could save us." 
Generals Brown and Scott having been wounded, the 
nmand of the army devolved upon Gen. Ripley, who, find- 
l his force much diminished, returned to Fort Erie. On 
J 4th of August, Gen. Drummond invested the Fort with 
>00 men. On the 2d of September, Gen. Brown threw 
nself into the Fort and assumed the command. He soon 
termined upon a sortie from the Fort, and carrried his 
m into effect on the 17th of September. Generals Miller 

* Manuscript letter of Gen. Miller. 



238 adjutant-general's report. 

and Porter led divisions, while Gen. Ripley commanrle 
the reserve. Gen. Miller thus describes this sortie c 
attack upon the enemy's works: — 

" Fort Erie, Sept. 19, 1814. 
" I am thankful once more to say to you I am alive and we 
after another sore conflict with the enemy on Saturday last, tl 
16th inst. After suffering fifty days by the investment of tl 
enemy, under a heavy cannonading from three batteries whk 
enfiladed almost our whole camp, suffering the loss of a consider 
ble number every day, it was determined to take their batterii 
by assault or storm. To effect this, it was determined by Gei 
Brown to send the riflemen, under Col. Gibson; Maj. Brooke, i 
the Twenty- third, and 400 men ; Gen. Porter with the voluntee 
and militia, with a few Indians, round through the woods in the 
rear ; and for me, with the Mnth, Eleventh, and Mneteenth Reg 
ments, to attack in front, to press through two of the batterii 
and form a junction with those in the rear, or attack the batterie 
as the case might require. Gen. Ripley was to remain in reserv 
My signal to move was the firing of those in the rear, as I hz 
taken post about fifty rods in front of the enemy, in a ravine. Tl 
columns were opposed before they arrived at either of the batterie 
I was ordered to advance and get into the enemy's works befo: 
the column in the rear had beaten the enemy sufficiently to me 
us at the batteries. We had no alternative but to fall on ther 
beat and take them. This was a sore job for us. My com mar 
consisted of the Mnth, Eleventh, and Mneteenth Regiments. Cc 
Aspinwall commanded the Mnth and Mneteenth, and Col. Bed 
the Eleventh. Col. Aspinwall lost his left arm; Maj. Trimble, < 
the Mneteenth, was severely, I believe mortally, wounded throug 
the body; Capt. Hale, of the Eleventh, killed; Capt. Ingersol 
of the Mnth, wounded in the head; and eight other office: 
severely wounded, some of them mortally. Col. Bedel* was tl 
only officer higher than a lieutenant, in my whole command, bi 

* Lieut.-Col. Bedel was of Bath. He was the son of Gen. Timothy Bedel, of Revol 
tionary memory, and was born at Salem, N. H., May 12,1764. The same or £ 
following year, he moved with his father's family to Haverhill, subsequently to Ba 
in May, 1770, and returned to Haverhill in 1777. At the age of twelve years, I 
accompanied his father as waiter in his expedition into Canada, and was an enlist 
soldier in Capt. Ezekiel Ladd's company, Col. Bedel's regiment, from April 1, 1778, 
May, 1779, acting as Issuing Commissary from Jan. 1, 1778, to May, 1779. 

Irt the militia of this State, he was appointed Second Lieutenant of the First Compaq 
in the Thirteenth Regiment, May 10, 1785 ; Lieutenant of same, Oct. 4, 1786 ; Captain 
the same, July 1, 1793; Major Second Battalion, Thirteenth Regiment, March 2S. 179 
Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the regiment, June 25, 1801; Brigadier-Gener 
Sixth Brigade, June 10, 1806, which command he held until April 9, 1812. 

In civil life he was active, energetic, and persevering; and the counties of Graft* 
and Coos owe much to his energy and enterprise in the way of settlements, road 
bridges, and other public improvements. One undertaking will show his energy : ] 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 239 

what was killed or wounded. I escaped again unhurt. Our loss 
was betwixt 400 and 500 killed, wounded, and prisoners. We took 
385 prisoners, besides what we killed and wounded. We took two 
twenty-four-pounders and a sixty-four-pound carronade, and a 
ten-and-a-half-inch mortar, drove them so hard that they spiked 
a twenty-four-pounder themselves, and so completely routed^them 
they have retreated back to Chippewa in disgust. We now live in 
peace . Deserters from them, since, say that their loss was estimated 
at rising 1,000 in killed, wounded, and prisoners. . . . Since I came 
into Canada this time, .... every major save one, every lieu- 
tenant-colonel, every colonel that was here when I came and has 
remained here, has been killed or wounded, and I am now the 
only general officer out of seven that has escaped. 

" James Miller." 

1802, he obtained a charter for building a bridge across the Connecticut, opposite Ha- 
verhill Corner, got the charter extended for two years in 1804, completed it in 1806, and 
remained sole owner of it until carried off by a freshet. It was then, as now, known 
as " Bedel's Bridge." He was also a large landed proprietor, and one of the purchasers 
and settlers of the " Indian Stream Territory," which purchase was made of certain 
Indians of the St. Francis tribe, formerly resident in the north part of the State. 

He was repeatedly a Selectman of Haverhill, Representative of the town in 1798 and 
1817, and Justice of the Peace for nearly thirty years. In 1812 he was appointed Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel in the United States Army, and commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Eleventh Regiment of United States Infantry, ranking from July 6, 1812. May 8, 1812, 
he tookcommaud of " the District of New-Hampshire for Recruiting," rendezvous at 
Concord, with orders to recruit seven companies. By the 16th of September, in spite 
of many obstacles, he had recruited 397 men, and had marched them in person to Bur- 
lington. Sept. 26, 1812, Col. Clark, in command of the Eleventh, left Burlington; and 
Lieut.-Col. Bedel was in command of the regiment until Aug. 22, 1813. From this 
time, such was his great executive ability, until September, 1814, Lieut.-Col. Bedel was 
kept by his superior officers upon detached duty, requiring energy and perseverance, 
and had no opportunity to participate in those battles in which his regiment had 
gained/by its valor, the title of the " Bloody Eleventh." Of course, a soldier from boy- 
hood, he chafed under this deprivation ; and, wheu opportunity ottered, he hastened 
to the front to take command of his regiment, which, by the battles of Chippewa and 
Lundy's Lane, was without a field-officer. He was in season to join Gen. Brown, 
when he assumed the command of Fort Erie, Sept. 2, 1814. At the memorable 
sortie of Sept. 17, Lieut.-Col. Bedel, with the Eleventh, at his particular solicitation, 
had the honor of leading Gen. Miller's column, and, being in the advance, disabled 
three guns, took twenty-four prisoners, and brought them from the field before the 
engagement became general, and otherwise so distinguished himself as to be honorably 
noticed by his superior officers. After this engagement, Lieut.-Col. Bedel was pro- 
moted to the Colonelcy of his regiment, — a promotion long before deserved, his com- 
mission bearing date Sept. 4, 1814. Upon the withdrawal of our forces from Canada, 
Gen. Brown's division, of which the Eleventh was a part, was ordered to Sackett's 
Harbor. There Col. Bedel remained with his regiment until the reduction of the 
army. Upon retiring from the army, he found his affairs in an embarrassed state, 
from which, with all his energy, he could not retrieve them ; and from wealth, owing 
to the misconduct of others, he was reduced to poverty. A friend who knew him well 
thus writes of him: " At one time he owned more than half the township of Bath, 
and a considerable portion of Haverhill, besides his lordly Indian domain on paper; 
yet, at the day of his departure for another world, he owned not an inch of land in 
the world he gladly left behind. May his charity and benevolence here, meet its reward 
in the future!" Gen. Bedel died at Bath, Jan. 13, 1841, in the seventy-seventh year 
of his age. 



240 adjutant-general's report. 

Gen. Miller passed the enemy's intrenchments between 
batteries No. 2 and No. 3, according to Gen. Brown's or- 
ders, and in so doing met a most terrific fire. Gen. Ripley, 
seeing the severe conflict, sent Lieut.-Col. Upham, with a 
portion of the gallant Twenty -first, to his assistance ; and, 
in thirty minutes from the commencement of the attack, 
" batteries No. 2 and No. 3, the enemy's intrenchments, and 
two block-houses were in our possession. Soon after, bat- 
tery No. 1 was abandoned by the British. The guns in each 
were spiked by us, or otherwise destroyed, and the maga- 
zine of No. 3 blown up. Thus," says Gen. Brown, " one 
thousand regulars, and an equal number of militia, in one 
hour of close action, blasted the hopes of the enemy, de- 
stroyed the fruits of fifty days' labor, and diminished his 
effective force 1,000 men at least." And thus, too, had the 
gallant Eleventh and Twenty-first Regiments, made up 
largely of men of New-Hampshire, again an opportunity 
to add to their laurels those won upon one of the most 
noted and severe conflicts of the war of 1812. 

Meantime, Plattsburg being left in a defenceless state 
from the withdrawal of troops, an attack was planned 
against that post by the British, and at the same time against 
the American fleet upon Lake Champlain, at anchor in the 
harbor of Plattsburg. The British army, under Gov. 
Provost, approached Plattsburg on the 6th of September, and 
commenced erecting batteries ; while the militia from New 
York and Vermont were continually arming for the pro- 
tection of Plattsburg. On the 11th day of September, 
Commander Downie, with the British fleet, appeared off 
Plattsburg ; and soon the battle began, with the American 
fleet under Commander McDonough, for the mastery of the 
Lake. This was the signal for the attack of the land forces 
under Provost, who was met with promptness and spirit by 
Gen. Macomb. The conflict was -severe, both on the land 
and the water ; but, after two hours and a half of hard fight- 
ing, the shout ran down the American lines announcing 
McDonough's victory. The fire of the British became fainter 
and fainter ; and at length they retired to their intrench- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 241 

ments, and in the night made a precipitate retreat. Our 
loss on land and water was less than 230 men ; while the 
British loss in wounded, deserters, and killed was estimated 
at 2,500. Thus closed the campaign on the Northern fron- 
tier. But we were less fortunate at the South. Washing- 
ton was taken, and most of the national edifices destroyed. 
But, in an attempt upon Baltimore, the British fleet was 
repulsed by our troops at Forts McHenry and Covington ; 
and the commander of the British land forces retreated, 
and the following day re-embarked. The fleet soon after 
left Chesapeake Bay. 

Our gallant navy still maintained its reputation upon the 
ocean and the lakes. 

At Pensacola, when the British had landed a force, and 
arms and ammunition to distribute among the Indians of 
Florida, Gen. Jackson, in October, exhibited his usual decis- 
ion and promptness. The Spanish Governor was remon- 
strated with in vain for affording protection to our enemies. 
Gen. Jackson at once marched his army into the city, 
stormed the fat, and drove the British out of Florida. 
Returning to Mfcile, he then learned of the contemplated 
attack upon New Orleans. He immediately marched his 
troops for the protection of that city, in almost a defenceless 
state. He at once called for troops, and commenced forti- 
fying the city. The fortifications progressed with energy 
under Jackson's controlling hand. Troops came down from 
Kentucky and Tennessee ; and on the 8th of January, 1815, 
Gen. Jackson won the glorious victory of New Orleans that 
immortalized his name, and closed "the war of 1812." 

A treaty of peace had been concluded at Ghent in 
December, and arrived, by special messenger, amid the 
rejoicings for this noted victory ; and rejoicings long and 
loud for both events went upward through the length and 
breadth of our land. But nowhere were the people more 
grateful for the return of peace than in New-Hampshire. 

The Legislature, in June, 1815, passed the following 

resolution unanimously, which was but the echo of public 

sentiment in this State : — 
16 



212 adjutant-general's report. 

" Whereas, Since the last session of the Legislature, the war 
lately commenced by the government of the United States against 
Great Britain having come to a close, and all classes of citizens 
having been emulous of each other in expressions of joy and 
congratulation upon the removal of its calamities by the restora- 
tion of the invaluable relations of amity and commerce between 
the two countries : And whereas, many of the officers, seamen, and 
soldiers of the United States, during the progress of the war, hav- 
ing in a very distinguished manner supported the honor of the 
American name by having in many signal instances most gallantly 
and successfully defended the soil and the rights of their country, 
and thereby happily contributed to sustain and perpetuate- that 
high character for military skill and prowess acquired during our 
Revolutionary contest ; therefore — 

" Resolved, hy the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court convened, That this Legislature, in common with their 
fellow-citizens, duly appreciate the important services rendered to 
the country, upon the ocean, upon the lakes, and upon the land, 
by officers, seamen, and soldiers of the United States, in many 
brilliant achievements and decisive victories, which will go down 
to posterity as an indubitable memorial that the sons of those fath- 
ers who fought the battles of the Revolution have imbibed from the 
same fountain that exalted and unconquerable spirit which insures 
victory, while it stimulates to the exercise of humanity and cour- 
tesy to the vanquished ; and, were it not invidious to particularize 
when so many appear justly entitled to distinction, this Legislature 
could not fail to recognize and designate, with sentiments of 
peculiar pride and pleasure, many of the hardy and independent 
citizens of New-Hampshire among those who enjoy the best claim 
to the grateful remembrance of their country." 

In 1815, a new edition of " all the general and public 
statutes " then in force was published under the supervis- 
ion of Hon. Jeremiah Smith. The Militia Law of 1808 
remained in force, with such additions and alterations as 
had been made during the seven preceding years. These 
were few and of no essential importance. A single regiment 
had been added in 1809, and other minor changes had been 
made, noticed in the Report for 1866. 

In June, 1813; an act was passed directing certificates to 
be obtained by soldiers unable to do military duty, from 
selectmen of towns and surgeons of regiments, certifying 
their inability, which should excuse them for one year ; for- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 243 

bidding selectmen or surgeons taking pay for such certifi- 
cates, and fixing fine for so doing ; providing manner of 
collecting fines ; repealing the section of the law of 1808 
providing for certificates to persons unable to perform mili- 
tary duty ; and explaining the section of the law of 1808 in 
relation to the rank of officers of cavalry. 

Nov. 5, 1813, so much of the act of 1808 as required com- 
missioned officers to be armed with a sword or hanger and 
a spontoon was repealed, and they required to be armed 
with sword or hanger only. 

June 24, 1814, it was provided that, from and after the 
first Wednesday of June, 1815, the Adjutant-General should 
pay to the commander of each company in this State two 
dollars annually, to be appropriated by them for the pur- 
chase and repair of musical instruments for the use of said 
companies. 

June 30, 1818, an act was passed by the Legislature that 
each commanding officer of a company make, or cause to be 
made, a return of his company to the commander of his 
regiment, before the first day of August annually, on for- 
feiture of ten dollars for neglect of such duty ; that the com- 
mander of each regiment make a return of the same to the 
brigade-major of his brigade before the first day of Sep- 
tember annually, on penalty of thirty dollars for neglect of 
such duty ; and that each brigade-major make a return of 
his brigade to the Adjutant-General before the first day 
of October annually, on penalty of paying a fine of thirty 
dollars for neglect of such duty. 

The fines for breach of the act were to be recovered by 
bill, plaint, or information in any court having jurisdiction ; 
and such fines, when recovered from commanders of com- 
panies, were to be appropriated for music in the companies 
whose officers had been fined, and the fines recovered 
from commanders of regiments and brigade-majors to be 
paid over to the Adjutant-General. 

This act also repealed so much of the act of 1808 as 
required officers to reside within the limits of their com- 
mands, in such towns as then or might afterwards contain 
one entire regiment. 



244 adjutant-general's report. 

July 1, 1819, a radical change was made in the militia 
laws of the State by the passage of a new act, repealing all 
preceding laws upon the subject, but providing that all 
officers then in commission should continue in commission, 
with same powers as before. It abolished the division of 
regiments into battalions, each under the command of a 
major; but, otherwise, the number and locality of each 
regiment, brigade, and division remained the same as under 
the former law. 

It provided for the enrolment of all resident white male 
citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, with 
certain special and conditional exempts ; and that the 
conditional exempts, engine-men excepted, including all 
enrolled between the ages of forty and forty-five years, should 
pay to the selectmen of the town or district in which such 
exempt resided two dollars annually on or before the first 
Tuesday of May. It prescribed the division, brigade, and 
regimental officers and their arms, — also, the arms of non- 
commissioned officers and privates ; the number of companies 
of light infantry or grenadiers, artillery, and cavalry to a 
regiment, and their officers, arms, and equipments ; how 
rifle companies might be formed, and how armed and offi- 
cered, and how independent companies might be formed ; 
provided music-money for the various companies, standards 
for cavalry, artillery, and infantry ; that the commanding 
officer of each company should parade his company on the 
first Tuesday of May annually for inspection, and on two 
other days beside the first Tuesday of May and the regi- 
mental muster ; directed the manner of warning ; that the 
selectmen of towns and districts should furnish refresh- 
ments for the non-commissioned officers and privates in 
their several towns and districts, and stipulated fines for 
neglect of that duty; exempted uniforms, arms, and equip- 
ments from attachment, and officers or soldiers from arrest 
when going to or from military duty or court-martial > 
provided that no non-commissioned officer or private should 
discharge gun or pistol on muster day or evening in or 
near any public highway, place of parade, or house, with- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 245 

out leave first obtained from a commissioned officer ; for the 
building of gun-houses ; the number and rank of the Gov- 
ernor's staff; provided that the Adjutant-General should 
attend all public reviews, where the Commander-in-chief 
should review, and prescribed his other duties ; that such 
compensation should be made him from time to time as the 
Legislature should think just; provided that there should 
be an Adjutant and Inspector-General to each division, with 
the rank of Colonel, and prescribed his duties, — also, the 
duties of brigade-majors and inspectors, adjutants of regi- 
ments, orderly sergeants, sergeant-majors, quartermaster ser- 
geants, and fife and drum majors ; prescribed the manner and 
time of making company, regimental, brigade, and division 
returns ; establishing the office of Quartermaster-General, 
and prescribing his duty ; attaching penalty to neglect of 
making returns by all officers from whom returns were or- 
dered, and directing manner of collecting the same ; pre- 
scribing the system of tactics to be followed, the number 
of members of a regimental or drum-head court-martial, 
and how the expenses of courts-martial should be paid ; pre- 
scribing the formation of regiments, and rank of companies, 
when on duty ; giving power to commanders of regiments 
and companies to reduce non-commissioned officers to the 
ranks when deserving of punishment ; empowering the field- 
officers of regiments to decide upon the color and fashion 
of the uniform of cavalry, artillery, light infantry, and gren- 
adiers ; ordering officers and privates to keep themselves 
equipped, selectmen to furnish poor privates with equip- 
ments, and stipulating fines for neglect of such duty ; pre- 
scribing the manner of ordering and holding courts-martial, 
and in giving and stipulating their authority and powers ; 
prescribing the duties of the Judge-Advocate ; prescribing 
compensation of courts-martial and of inquiry, and witnesses 
of, and how paid ; ordering, how military watches, guards, 
or detachments of militia were to* be made, how furnished 
with provisions, and prescribing penalty for neglect of such 
duty ; authorizing the Captain-General to appoint signals of 
alarm ; making provision for the heirs of those killed in ser- 



246 

vice ; directing manner of obtaining certificates of inability 
to perform military duty ; exempting members of engine 
companies ; fixing limits and bounds for parade ; attaching 
penalty to persons refusing to give information to enrolling- 
officers ; enacting seventeen articles including sundry regu- 
lations of minor importance ; authorizing all fines or for- 
feitures for breach of the law to be recovered by action, bill, 
plaint, or information in any court having jurisdiction; 
providing for annual musters for inspection and service, 
limiting the times of holding the same, and directing how 
the orders for the same should be issued; prescribing the 
duty of the major-generals as to reviews ; authorizing clerks 
of companies to collect fines and forfeitures, and describing 
the process of so doing ; and appropriating to clerks of 
companies one-fourth of all fines and forfeitures collected 
by them, the balance to be appropriated for the company 
expenses, as a majority of the officers of the company should 
direct. 

But this law of 1818 was not allowed a fair trial, as, 
Dec. 22, 1820, it was repealed and another law passed 
in its stead. This law added some new features. It pro- 
vided, among other things, that the commanding officer of 
a company should call out his company by his own order 
once a year, and no more, aside from the annual inspection 
in May ; abolished the office of Adjutant and Inspector Gen- 
eral of Divisions, and substituted that of Inspector of Divis- 
ions ; made it the duty of the adjutants of the regiments 
to inspect the same at their annual musters, specifying that 
returns should be made of companies to the adjutants of 
regiments, and by them directly to the Adjutant-General ; 
provided that the Governor might order the Adjutant-Gen- 
eral to perform the duties of the Quartermaster-General, if 
there should be a vacancy in that office, or if the Quarter- 
master-General should live at a distance from the seat of 
government ; empowering the commissioned officers of com- 
panies, with the commanders of regiments, to reduce non- 
commissioned officers to the ranks for misdemeanors ; pro- 
viding that all officers should reside within the limits of 



MILITAEY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 247 

their commands, — that the commanding officers of regi- 
ments should assemble the officers of their commands once 
each year at some convenient and central place within the 
limits of the regiments, for instruction by some person 
qualified therefor ; that major-generals should review three 
regiments in their divisions each year, and the brigadiers 
such regiments in the brigades as were not reviewed by 
the major-generals ; that, in time of peace, no greater body 
of militia than a regiment should be called together except 
by permission of the Commander-in-chief ; that the places 
of review should be as central as convenience would per- 
mit ; that, where regiments were so extensive as that part 
of the soldiers would be obliged to march more than fif- 
teen miles, the field-officers of such regiments should have 
power to order the regiment out in two divisions on differ- 
ent days ; and designating certain sections of the Militia 
Law to be read, or caused to be read, by the captain of each 
company, at its annual inspection in May. 

Under this law, the organization of the militia of the 
State was as follows : — 

His Excellency Samuel Bell, Captain-General and Com- 
mander-in-chief. 
Benj. Butler, Adjutant-General, ) Rank of 
Henry Sweetser, Quar.-General, ) Brig.-Gen. 

AIDES TO HIS EXCELLENCY. 

Ichabod Bartlett, Portsmouth. 
Joseph, Low, Concord. 
Josiah Bellows, 3d, Walpole. 
Russell Jarvis, Claremont. 

FIRST DIVISION. 

Timothy Upham, Major-General. 

Charles W. Cutter, ) A . n 

Richard Bartlett, | Aldes to Ma J- Gen - Upham. 

Richard Bartlett,* Acting Division-Inspector. 

Joseph Cilley, Division Quartermaster. 

* Col. Richard Bartlett was born in Pembroke. Jan. 8, 1794. He early imbibed a 
taste for literature in the office of the late Col. Philip Carrigain. of facetious memory, 
with such associates as the late Gen. Charles G. Haines, and Prof. Nathaniel H. 






248 adjutant-general's report. 



SECOND DIVISION. 

John Montgomery, Major-General. 

Joseph Bell,* ) . ,_ . _ 

Nath. T. Hurd, Aldes to Ma J-- Gen - Montgomery. 

Edward B. Nealley, Inspector. 

John Y. Barron, Quartermaster. 

third division. 

Eliphalet Gay, Major-General . 

John Duncan, ) 

Henry H. Sylvester, | Aides to Mi«.-Gen. Ga 7- 

Ezekiel Jewett, Inspector. 

Abiel Wilson, jr., Quartermaster. 

FIRST BRIGADE. 

Edward J. Long, Brigadier-General. 
John Blunt, Aide to Brig.-Gen. Long. 
James Burleigh, Brigade-Inspector. 
Jacob Wendell, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Ichabod Bartlett, Judge-Advocate. 

Carter. He graduated at Dartmouth, in the class of 1815. He read law with Col. 
Carrigain, and commenced its practice at Concord, in 1818. He was Deputy Secretary 
of State in 1818, '19, '20, '21, '22, and '23; Aide-de-camp and ActiDg Division-Inspec- 
tor upon Maj.-Gen. Timothy Upham's staff in 1820; Aide to Gov. Samuel Bell in 182L 
and '22 ; Assistant Clerk of the Senate in 1821 and '22 ; Secretary of State in 1825, 
'26, '27, and '28 ; Representative from Concord in the Legislature in 1830 and '31 ; was 
proprietor and editor of the "New-Hampshire Journal" (now " Xew-Hanipshire 
Statesman "), and removed to New York in 1834, where he practised his profession, and 
indulged his taste for literary pursuits. He was fond of historical research, and fur- 
nished articles for publication in the New-Hampshire Historical Society's Collections, 
and valuable donations to its library. Col. Bartlett died at New York, unmarried, 
Oct. 23, 1837, aged forty-three years. 

* Col. Joseph Bell was of Haverhill, and a prominent lawyer. He was a native of 
Bedford, the son of Joseph Bell, of that town, where he was born March 27, 1787. He 
graduated at Dartmouth in the class of 1807, — read law in the offices of Gov. Samuel 
Bell, then of Amherst; in that of Judge Dana, of Groton, Mass. ; in that of Gov. Smith, 
of Exeter : entered the bar in 1810, and settled at Haverhill, where he was cashier for 
some years of a bank. He soon became prominent as an able lawyer and advocate at 
the Grafton bar, and his reputation as such was by no means confined to the county 
or State. He was appointed Solicitor for Grafton County in 1815, and held the office 
until 1820. He represented the town of Haverhill inthe Legislature in 1821, '28, '29, 
and '30. The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him in 1S37 by 
Dartmouth College ; and in 1847 he removed to Boston, where he took a prominent posi- 
tion at the Suffolk bar. Mr. Bell represented Boston in the General Court in 1844, '45, 
'4G, and '47, and was a Senator from Suffolk in 1848 and '49, being the President of that 
body in the latter year. He died at Saratoga, N. Y., July 25, 1851, aged sixty-four years. 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPHIRE. 249 

SECOND BRIGADE. 

Daniel Hoit, Brigadier-General. 
James Bartlett, Aide to Brig.-Gen. Hoit. 
Matthew Perkins, Inspector. 
Rufus Parish, Quartermaster. 
Lyman B. Walker,* Judge-Advocate. 

THIRD BRIGADE. 

William Montgomery, Brigadier-General. 
John Nesmith, Aide. 
Richard Davis, Inspector. 
Robert Mack, Quartermaster. 
James Thorn, Judge-Advocate. 

FOURTH BRIGADE. 

John Steele, Brigadier-General. 
John Smith, jr., Aide. 
David Steele, Inspector. 
George W. Senter, Quartermaster. 
Henry B. Chase, Judge- Advocate. 

FIFTH BRIGADE. 

John Quimby, Brigadier-General. 
Jas. Noyes, Aide. 
Charles Flanders, Inspector. 
David Hale, Quartermaster. 
Henry Hubbard,f Judge-Advocate. 

* Lyman B. "Walker was of Gilford, resident in that part of the town known as 
"Meredith Bridge." He was a lawyer by profession. He was born in Brookfield, 
Mass., and removed with his father to Vermont at an early age. He moved to Gilford 
in 1814, and commenced the practice of the law. He was appointed Judge-Advocate 
of the Second Brigade in 1817, and continued in that office until 1827. He held the office 
of Solicitor for the County of Strafford from 1819 to 1827. He represented the town of 
Gilford in the Legislature in 1820 and 1830. He was appointed Attorney-General in 
1843, and removed to Concord, continuing in this office until 1848. Mr. Walker was 
a man of ability, a good lawyer, of genial manners, and of great pleasantry and ready 
wit. He died at Gilford, June 22, 1858, aged seventy-one years. 

t Henry Hubbard was of Charlestown, the son of Hon. John Hubbard, and was born 
May 3, 1784. He graduated at Dartmouth in the class of 1803, and read law with the 
Hon. Jeremiah Mason, of Portsmouth. He entered upon his profession at his native 
town immediately upon entering the bar, in 1806. He represented the. town of Charles- 
town in the Legislature in the years 1812, '13, '14, '15, '19, '20, '23, '24, '25, '26, and '27. 
In 1825, June 16, he was elected Speaker of the House in place of Hon. Levi Wood- 
bury, who had been elected to a seat in the United States Senate, and was elected to 
the same office in 1826 and '27. He was appointed Solicitor for Cheshire County in 1823, 






250 



SIXTH BRIGADE. 

James Poole, Brigadier-General. 

Abner Allen, Aide. 

Clark Hough, Inspector. 

David C. Churchill, Quartermaster. 

Jeduthan Wilcox, Judge-Advocate. 

REGIMENTS. 

1. Joshua "W. Pierce, Colonel. 

John Goodrich, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
David C. Foster, Major. 

2. Job C. Waldron, Colonel. 
Joseph Ham, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Isaac Jenness, Major. 

3. Merrill Flanders, Colonel. 
Jacob Noyes, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jonathan Nason, Major. 

4. Joseph Towle, Colonel. 

George Kittredge, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Amos Paul, Major. 

5. Benjamin P. Brown, Colonel. 

, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Samuel Clapp, Major. 

6. Obed Slate, Colonel. 

Alvin B. Doolittle, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Stephen BufFum, Major. 

7. William Page, Colonel. 

Benjamin Eastman, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William Webster, Major. 

and served the term of five years ; exhibiting those rare qualities as an advocate for 
which he afterwards became noted. In 1827 Mr. Hubbard was appointed Judge of 
Probate for the County of Sullivan, and continued to discharge the duties of that office 
until 1829, when he was elected a Representative to Coi^gress, and was re-elected for 
two consecutive terms following, serving hi that capacity six years. In 1S35 he was 
elected to the Senate of the United States for six years, served his term, and, in 1842, 
was elected Governor of the State. He was re-elected in 1843. Soon after leaving the 
gubernatorial chair, he was appointed Sub-Treasurer, and removed to Boston. Gov. 
Hubbard was an able advocate, a fluent speaker, of agreeable address, quick per- 
ception, and great energy of character. He died at Charlestown in June, 1857, aged 
seventy-four years. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 251 

8. Thomas Nesmith, Colonel. 
Mark Fisk, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Daniel Butler, Major. 

9. John Stinson, Colonel. 
Phinehas Stone, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William P. Riddle, Major. 

10. John Bickford, Colonel. 
John Chase, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Pearson Cogswell, Major. 

11. Isaac Eastman,* Colonel. 

, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Asa Head,f Major. 

12. Samuel Griffin, Colonel. 
James Farrar, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Thomas Tolman, Major. 

13. Moses H. Clement, Colonel. 
James Rogers, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
James R. Page, Major. 

14. John Palmer, Colonel. 
Ward Cook, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Benjamin Haines, Major. 

15. Joseph Alden, Colonel. 
Samuel Higgins, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
, Major. 

16. Nathan Glidden, Colonel. 
David Parker, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Nathan Huntoon, Major. 

* Gen. Isaac Eastman was the son of Capt. Nathaniel Eastman, of East Concord, 
Mid was born June 16, 1780. He was by trade a blacksmith, and carried on an exten- 
sive business at East Concord. He was appointed Captain of the Tenth Company of 
[nfantry in the Eleventh Regiment, June 10, 1811; promoted Lieutenant-Colonel 
)f the same, June 30, 1817; Colonel, Nov. 5, 1819; appointed Brigadier- General 
)f the Third Brigade, June, 1821; and Major-General of the First Division, June, 1823, 
ivhich office he resigned in 1824. Gen. Eastman was an upright, honest man, and died 
tiighly respected, April 1, 18G4, in the eighty-fourth year of his age. 

t Col. Asa Head was of Pembroke. He was appointed Captain of the First Company 
)f Light Infantry in the Eleventh Regiment, Oct. 24, 1815. He was appointed Major 
)f the Eleventh Regiment, May 19, 1820; Lieutenant-Colonel of the same, Dec. 8, 1820; 
Colonel, June, 1821 ; and resigned the office in 1824. He was a farmer, a man of in- 
;egrity, and much respected in his town. In 1814, he went to Portsmouth at the head 
ifa detachment of volunteers, being attached to Capt. Fuller's company of " drafted 
nilitia." His company was discharged Nov. 11, 1814. 






252 adjutant-general's report. 

17. Samuel D. Mason, Colonel. 
John Head,* Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Nathan Brown, jr., Major. 

18. Bradbury Bartlett, Colonel. 
Dudley Lyford, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Samuel Marston, Major. 

19. Lewis Burleigh, Colonel. 

J. D. Quimby, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William C. Freese, Major. 

20. Simeon Cobb, Colonel. 

Justus Perry, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Seth Hall, jr., Major. 

21. Jonathan Bean, Colonel. 

Joseph Atkinson, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John Greeley, Major. 

22. Timothy Putnam, Colonel. 
Peter Felt, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jeremiah Smith, Major. 

23. Thomas Perkins, Colonel. 

Solomon Waite, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Abel Baker, Major. 

24. John Wilson, Colonel. 

Lewis Loomis, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joel Hemmenway, Major. 

25. John Frost, Colonel. 

Vincent Meserve, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Azariah Waldron, Major. 

26. Hugh Moore, Colonel. 

Solomon McNeil, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Retire Kimball, Major. 

27. Benjamin Cook, Colonel. 
Henry Hyde, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Abraham Marston, Major. 

* Lieut. -Col. John Head was the son of Capt. Nathaniel Head (see Adjutant-Ge: 
eral's Report, vol. ii., 1866, p. 364) of* Revolutionary memory, and -was born May J 
1791, in that part of Chester now known as Hooksett, where he resided until 1 
death, which occurred Aug. 7, 1835. He was appointed Captain of the Xinth Compai 
of the Seventeenth Regiment, June 11, 1814, and Lieutenant-Colonel of the san 
regiment, May 19, 1820, which position he resigned June 8, 1822. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 253 

28. Elijah Huntley, Colonel. 
William Cary, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Ebenezer Atwood, Major. 

29. Christopher S. Sanborn, Colonel. 
Jonathan Pearson, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Ebenezer Brown, Major. 

30. Philip S. Harvey, Colonel. 
Stephen Hoyt, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John Harvey, Major. 

31. Hendrick Robinson, jr., Colonel. 
Erastus Baldwin, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Abel Wheeler, Major. 

32. David Rankin, Colonel. 
Daniel Clark, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
David S. Miles, Major. 

33. Isaac Davis, Colonel. 
Josiah Chamberlain, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Thomas Tash, Major. 

34. Levi Flanders, Colonel. 
William Crawford, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph Morse, Major. 

35. Merrick Piper, Colonel. 
Stephen Pickering, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Abraham Drake, Major. 

36. George P. Meserve, Colonel. 
Jacob Durgin, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Stephen Wentworth, Major. 

37. Otis Barney, Colonel. 
Daniel Pattee, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William Livingston, Major. 

38. Jonathan Rollins, Colonel. 
Benjamin Wells, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Stephen Moore, Major. 

June 27, 1821, an additional act was passed, authorizing 
the captain or commanding officer of a company having no 



254 adjutant-general's report. 

non-commissioned officers to order privates in such com 
pany to warn the men belonging to such company to mee 
for any inspection, training, or muster; and providing, ij 
case such soldier so ordered should refuse or neglect t 
notify and warn all such men, he should forfeit and pa, 
the sum of two dollars for every man he should neglect t 
warn. The act also specified that the captains of companie 
should make their returns to the regimental quartermas 
ters within ten days after the annual inspection in May ; tha 
the regimental quartermasters should make their return 
to the Quartermaster-General within twenty-four days afte 
the annual training in May ; and that, if any such office 
should neglect to make such returns within the times spec 
fled, he should forfeit and pay the sum of twenty dollars. 

June 26, 1822, an act was passed dividing the Secon 
Regiment, and providing that the companies at Dove 
and Somersworth should constitute the Second Regimen 
and those at Rochester, Farmington, and Milton th 
Thirty-ninth Regiment, to be attached to the Secon 
Brigade. 

July 2, 1822, an additional act was passed, directing i 
what manner the annual allowance of twelve dollars t 
each company of artillery should be expended; dennin 
the authority of captains on days of inspection in May 
the duties of division and brigade inspectors in certai 
cases ; providing books for quartermasters' records ; specif; 
ing the times when the captains should make their returr 
to the adjutants and quartermasters, when the latter shoul 
make their returns to the Adjutant-General and Quarte: 
master-General, and providing that such officers should pa^ 
for each neglect of such duty, the sum of twenty dollars 
empowering the Commander-in-chief to accept the resign! 
tion of officers in certain cases' ; providing the grade an 
number of officers constituting courts-martial, and dennin 
the powers of the same ; directing the manner of formin 
regiments in line ; exempting the students of Dartmout 
College from military duty ; and repealing certain clause 
of the Militia Law of 1820. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 255 

June 12, 1824, an additional act was passed, enacting 
that all officers who held commissions in the militia prior 
to and on the 22d of December, 1820, and who had held 
commissions for four years and been discharged, and all 
officers who might thereafter hold commissions for four 
years and be discharged, should be absolutely exempted 
from military duty. 

July 2, 1825, an act was passed, making it unlawful for 
any persons, excepting those belonging to companies of 
artillery, to remove cannon, or any of the apparatus per- 
taining thereto, from any gun-house or other place where 
kept, in order to use the same, without written permission 
from the commanding officer of the company to which said 
ordnance belonged, and attaching a penalty of not less than 
five dollars, nor more than twenty, for every such offence ; 
and the party offending to pay double the amount of injury 
sustained by such ordnance or apparatus in consequence of 
such taking or removal ; also, providing that, if any injury 
should be done to any cannon or its apparatus by persons 
not belonging to a company of artillery, and who should 
have permission from the proper officer, such persons should 
pay a sum equal to the injury sustained ; also, providing 
that, if any person should injure or break open any gun- 
house, he should pay a fine of not less than five dollars, nor 
more than twenty, for every such offence ; and directing 
how the fines in the several cases might be collected, and 
how to be appropriated when collected. 

There were no more additions to, or alterations of, the 
militia laws of the State until 1829 ; and the militia of the 
State attained a deservedly high reputation for efficiency. 
In 1829, Jan. 2 and March 9, a new militia law was passed, 
making material changes in the law of 1820. This law 
was formed and reported by a " committee on the revision 
of the laws," consisting of Chief Justice William M. Rich- 
ardson,* Col. Samuel D. Bell, and John Porter, Esq. They 



* Hon. William Marchant Richardson was born at Pelham, Jan. 4,1774, and grad- 
uated at Harvard University in the class of 1797. After leaving the University, he 
devoted himself to teaching, and was the Preceptor of Lancaster Academy for a time, 






256 adjutant-genehal's report. 

reported four bills, concerning the provisions relative to the 
militia, and comprising Chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Title 

and subsequently Preceptor of the Academy in G-roton, in which position he remained 
until his admission to the bar. He finished the study of his profession in the office of 
Samuel Dana, Esq., of Groton, Mass., with whom he formed a partnership in business. 
Upon the election of Gen. Varnum to the United States Senate in 1811, Mr. Richardson 
was elected as his successor in the House of Representatives from that district. He 
was re-elected, but resigned his seat in 1814, for the purpose of removing to Ports- 
mouth, N.H., where he established himself in his profession. In 1816, he was 
appointed Chief Justice of the Superior Court of this State. In 1819, Chief Justice 
Richardson took up his residence in Chester, where he resided until his death. Judge 
Richardson was remarkable for his industrious habits. Aside from his j udicial duties, he 
prepared for publication most of the first nine volumes of the New-Hampshire Reports. 
In addition, he published "The New-Hampshire Justice," "The Town Officer," and 
had also prepared for the press " A Treatise upon the Office and Duties of Sheriffs " ; and 
during the same time was chairman of the committee raised by the Legislature, June, 
1826, to " revise and collect together the provisions of different statutes upon the same 
subject, and of arranging and publishing a new edition of the laws," which duty he 
performed very acceptably to the public. His judicial labors were highly appreciated, 
and Dartmouth College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws. 

Judge Richardson, as a jurist, ranked among the eminent men of his time. One 
who knew him well, and knew what he had done, said of him, "It will not derogate 
from the merits of any individual to say, that no one in the State has done so much, 
in the department of the law, to entitle himself to be deemed a public benefactor." 
Judge Richardson died at Chester, March 23, 1838, in the sixty-fifth year of his age. 

Col. Samuel Dana Bell is the son of thg late Gov. Samuel Bell, and was born hi 
Francestown, Oct. 9, 1798. He graduated at Harvard University in the class of 1816, 
and read law with the Hon. George Sullivan, of Exeter. He entered the bar ot 
Rockingham, Feb. 20, 1820. He first established himself in the practice of his pro- 
fession in 1820, at "Meredith Bridge," where he continued about six months, when he 
removed to Chester. 

He was appointed Quartermaster of the Seventeenth Regiment, April 10, 1821; Notary 
Public, June 26, 1822 ; Solicitor of the County of Rockingham, June 14. 1823 ; Adjutant of 
the Seventeenth Regiment, Aug. 26, 1823; Justice of the Peace for the County of Rock- 
ingham, Nov. 10, 1823 j Judge-Advocate of the Third Brigade, Dec. 10, 1824; elected a 
Representative from Chester in the Legislature for 1825 and '26; on the commit- 
tee to revise the statutes of the State, June 30, 1826 ; Major of the Seventeenth Regi- 
ment, June 30, 1826 ; was elected Clerk of the House of Representatives June 6. 1627 ; 
appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the Seventeenth Regiment, June 26, 1827; re-elected 
Clerk of the House of Representatives, June 4, 1828; re-appointed Solicitor of Rock- 
ingham, June 14, 1828, but did not accept; appointed Colonel of the Seventeenth 
Regiment, June 18, 1828; resigned as Clerk of the House, Nov. 21,1828; resigned 
and discharged as Colonel of the Seventeenth Regiment, May 13, 1830; appointed 
Cashier of the Exeter Bank in 1830, and removed to Exeter. He held this position 
until 1836, when, in October of that year, he removed to Concord, and entered upon the 
practice of his profession. May 2, 1839, he removed to Manchester, where he has since 
resided. In 1840 he was appointed at the head of the commission to revise the statutes ; 
and, upon the adoption of a city government by Manchester, he was appointed Justice of 
the Police Court, Sept. 28, 1846. He held this office until his appointment as Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas, June 25, 1848. Aug. 31, 1849, he was appointed an Associate Jus- 
tice of the Superior Court. In 1854 the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon 
him by Dartmouth College. He held the office of Associate Justice until Aug. 31, 
1859, when he was appointed Chief Justice of the Superior Court. This office he re- 
signed, the resignation to take effect Aug. 1, 1864, and retired to private life, holding 
no public office except the one first conferred upon him,— that of Notary Public. After 
retiring from the bench, he has been the same diligent student as before. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 257 

XC. of the Revised Statutes of 1830. The committee fur- 
nished a brief of this Militia Law, explaining some of its 
essential provisions, and their difference from the preceding 
laws. They remark of the Militia Law thus : " The prin- 
cipal statute relating to the militia, from its length and the 
method of its arrangement, is of difficult reference. The 
committee have thought this inconvenience might be les- 
sened by dividing the subject, and placing those parts of 
the law, which are most rarely used, in separate bills. With 
this view they report four bills on the subject." 

Of Chapter 8, " An Act relating to the Powers and 
Duties of certain Officers of the Militia," they remark : 
f The provisions of this bill may be found in Sections 8, 9, 

In addition to his ordinary labors, Judge Bell has found time to attend to literary- 
pursuits, and few men among us are better posted in the sciences. It was the remark 
of a noted master-mechanic of the city, that, when Judge Bell came into the shop, he 
always " laid aside his tools to listen ; for the Judge could tell him more about steam 
and steam-engines than he knew himself." And so of other scientific matters; he 
studied them, and what he studied he understood. 

He assisted Judge Richardson in publishing M The New-Hampshire Justice," pub- 
lished " The Justice and Sheriff"," edited a secorra. edition of " The Town Officer," and 
was upon the commission of 1826, '27, and '28 for collecting and arranging the 
statutes; on that of 1840 and '41 ibr revising the statutes; and again upon the com- 
mission of 1865, '66, and '67 for revising and publishing " The General Statutes." 

Few men in our State have had more of the confidence of their fellow-citizens, and few 
men have better deserved that confidence. In whatever position he has been placed, 
he has brought to it a knowledge and an untiring industry that has ever rendered him 
successful. Aside from his public duties, ever met and performed, he has had the in- 
clination, and found the time, to engage in all matters of public improvement; and the 
city of Manchester owes many of the improvements that adorn it to his generous im- 
pulse and enlightened foresight. Its cemetery, its schools and school-houses, its pub- 
lic squares, and last, though not least, its public library, are mainly owing to his fore- 
sight and generous patronage; while the State at large is indebted to him for sweeping 
away many of the cobwebs of technicalities and red-tape that have long encumbered 
the courts of justice. Having the confidence of his fellow-citizens and the regards of a 
host of friends, Judge Bell, though somewhat afflicted by disease, is enjoying a quiet 
and philosophical repose ; calmly awaiting the summons to appear before the Omni- 
scient Judge, with the firm conviction that " the Judge of all the earth will assuredly 
do right." 

John Porter, Esq., was of Derry. He was born in Bridgewater, Mass., Feb. 26, 
1776, and graduated at Dartmouth College in the class of 1803. He read law in the 
office of A. Hutchinson, Esq., of Lebanon, N.H., and commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession at Londonderry. He represented that town in the Legislature in 1817 and '27, 
and the town of Derry (a part of Londonderry incorporated as a town) in 1828, '30, 
'33, '35, '41, '42, '44, and '47. Mr. Porter was " a gentleman of the old school," modest 
and retiring in his manners, methodical in his habits; a well-read lawyer; an honest, 
upright man, and, as such, enjoyed the confidence of the community in a high degree. 
He died Dec. 4, 1857, aged eighty-two years. 

17 



258 

15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 28, 37, 38, 39, 41, 
42, 43, and 44 of the Statutes 1820 ; 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 of Stat- 
utes 1822, Chapter 37 ; Sections 6 and 7 of Statutes 1821, 
Chapter 30 ; Section 2 of Statutes 1821, Chapter 1 ; and 
Statutes 1824, Chapter 48. 

" Section 6 provides that the Adjutant-General shall in- 
spect. The object of this provision is to introduce a more 
correct and uniform method of inspection than is supposed 
generally to prevail ; and, at the same time, by bringing the 
several regiments under the personal observation of that 
officer, to enable him to provide appropriate remedies for 
such defects, in the mode of carrying into effect the militia 
laws, as properly come within his province. 

" Section 13 makes it the duty :of each colonel to muster 
his regiment annually ; and makes his orders for that pur- 
pose imperative, whether they are agreeable to those of 
his superiors or not. The object of this is to supersede 
the necessity of proving the orders of the major and brig- 
adier generals ; the ordeiJ of the colonel by the existing 
being of no force, unless they are in accordance with those 
of his superiors, to procure which is attended with trouble 
and useless expense. 

" Section 15 prescribes certain duties to regimental 
quartermasters, substantially those usually performed by 
them. 

" Section 16 is designed to obviate what is believed to 
be now the greatest defect of the militia system, — that 
very many able-bodied men avoid the performance of mili- 
tary duty by improperly obtaining surgeon's certificates. 
Many disabilities exist which cannot be determined with 
certainty from a casual examination ; and it is believed that 
many hundreds of robust and athletic men obtain certifi- 
cates every year entirely upon the strength of representa- 
tions made by them to the surgeons. Such representations 
are often proved to be false, and the deception practised 
upon the surgeon is made a matter of boasting. In many 
of these cases, as the law at present is, the surgeon, judg- 
ing honestly upon the circumstances before him, cannot be 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 259 

blamed. It is supposed that this difficulty may be in some 
degree remedied by requiring all applicants for certificates 
to be under oath, and publicly made and decided upon. 
There is a class of cases where the disability is necessarily 
permanent ; and in these instances no benefit can result 
from limiting the exemption to one or two years. 

" Section 18 transfers the duty of making inspection 
returns to the captains of companies, who are now the 
officers properly responsible." 

Of Chapter 4, " An Act relating to Courts-martial and 
Courts of Inquiry," they say : " This bill embraces the pro- 
visions of the present law, relating to military courts and 
the duties of judge-advocates, without material alteration. 
Those provisions may be found in Sections 30 to the 34th, 
inclusive, of the Statutes of 1820." 

Of Chapter 5, " An Act relating to the Organization and 
Equipment of the Militia, and for other purposes," they say : 
" Section 11 provides for a case of not unfrequent occur- 
rence,' — that of companies becoming so much reduced in 
point of numbers as to defeat the object of their organiza- 
tion. The other provisions of this bill will be found in 
Sections 2, 3, 7, 11, 12, 13, 24, 25, 27, 35, 36, 43, 45, and 
46 of Statutes 1820 ; Statutes 1824, Chapter 34 ; Sections 
1 and 8 of Statutes 1822, Chapter 37 ; and Statutes 1822, 
Chapter 11." 

Of Chapter 6, " An Act imposing Fines for neglect of 
Military Duty, and for other purposes," they say: " Section 
3. By the existing law, the obligation to perform mili- 
tary duty is imposed on those only who are duly enrolled, 
— an unimportant circumstance being made essential. By 
this section the liability is imposed on all persons liable to 
be enrolled. By another bill it is proposed to make it the 
duty of captains to enroll ; the neglect of which will of 
course be punishable, but will not serve to exonerate any 
from military duties. 

" Section 6. A clause in this section provides that the 
insertion of any person's name in the company's orders shall 
be evidence of his enrolment. 



260 

" Section 8. The orders and return under oath of a 
sergeant that he has warned any private are made evidence 
of notice by the statute now in force, provided such orders 
and return are duly recorded in the orderly-book. This 
qualification is productive of inconvenience, and is there- 
fore omitted. A clause is inserted making a copy of the 
record of such orders and return evidence. 

" Section 9. The law now authorizes captains to warn 
their companies on parade verbally, but makes no provision 
relative to the proof of such warning. The method is con- 
venient for the officers and soldiers, and this section is 
proposed to remedy that defect. 

" Section 12 imposes a certain fine on soldiers guilty of 
disobedience, &c. The present law makes such soldiers 
liable to be tried by a drum-head court-martial, as it is 
called. Few officers have sufficient knowledge of the law 
to conduct such a trial properly ; and various mistakes, 
which they might consider of trivial importance, would sub- 
ject the officer, proceeding to collect a fine under their 
sentence, to a ruinous lawsuit. 

" Section 14 requires a roll to be made of delinquen- 
cies, and makes such roll, or a copy of the record of it, 
admissible as evidence of the offences stated in it. The 
object is to avoid subjecting officers to any unnecessary 
expense in procuring evidence. 

" Section 16 gives to the prosecuting officer an election 
to prosecute minors, or their parents or guardians ; a suit 
against the parent (a pauper, perhaps) being sometimes 
wholly ineffectual, while, if the minor were personally 
liable, the duty would be performed, or the fine promptly 
recovered. 

" Sections 18, 19, and 20 are proposed as substitutes for 
Sections 50 and 51 of the law of 1820. 

"It is now the duty of the clerks of companies, to which 
they are bound by their oaths, to file an information against 
all offending soldiers who are not excused by the com- 
manding officer of the company. No discretion is given to 
the clerk, nor has he any interest in the prosecution beyond 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 261 

the paltry share of the fines given him by the law ; yet 
he is deemed a plaintiff in a civil action, and subjected to 
all the expense and hazard of a party pursuing his private 
rights for his individual benefit: and many cases have oc- 
curred where a conscientious officer, in the honest attempt 
to perform his duty in enforcing the law, has been subjected 
to the loss of his property, and little less than utter ruin. 
In consequence of this circumstance, in many parts of the 
State, suitable persons cannot be found who are willing to 
undertake the duties of this office, and no fines can be col- 
lected. The committee are satisfied that the militia system 
should by no means be abandoned, but that, on the con- 
trary, it should be rendered as perfect as practicable ; and 
no part of the law is so susceptible of improvement as that 
which relates to the collection of fines. Under this im- 
pression, the committee recommend that the present system 
of prosecution for fines should be abandoned ; and that 
offences of this kind, like other public offences and violations 
of the law, should be prosecuted by a complaint under oath 
before a justice of the peace ; and that the proceedings 
should be similar to those in prosecutions for breaches of 
the peace, except that a summons should be substituted for 
a warrant to arrest the offender. These sections are de- 
signed to carry into effect the change proposed. 

" The remaining sections of this bill embrace substantially 
provisions found in Sections 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12, 36, 40, 48, 
49 of Statutes 1820; Section 9 of Statutes 1822, Chapter 
37; and Section 1 of Statutes 1821, Chapter 21. 

"The first, fourth, and eighth clauses of Section 43, Stat- 
utes 1820, are omitted as unnecessary ; and the ninth clause 
as conferring a privilege, and in no degree adding to the 
disgrace of crime. The first four sections of the Statutes 
of 1821, Chapter 30, are omitted, being obsolete; and the 
Statute of 1825, Chapter 66, seems not to require a revi- 
sion." 

The organization of the militia of the State under this 
law for 1830 was as follows : — 






262 

Captain-General and Commander-in-Chief. 
His Excellency Matthew Harvey,* Hopkinton. 

AIDES-DE-CAMP. 

James Creighton. 
Warren Lovell. 
John H. Steele. f 
Henry H. Sylvester. 
Samuel C. Webster, with the rank of Colonel. 

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

Joseph Low, who is also Quartermaster-General (Acting) 
with the rank of Brigadier-General. 

COMMISSARY-GENERAL. 

John B.Hill. 

DIVISION AND DIVISIONARY STAFF OFFICERS — FIRST DIVISION, 
FIRST AND THIRD BRIGADES. 

Major-General Joseph Towle. 

AIDES-DE-CAMP. 

George W. Towle. 
Abraham P. Blake. 

* Gov. Harvey was the son of Matthew Harvey of Sutton, and was born there June 
21, 1781. He graduated at Dartmouth College in the class of 1806. Having com- 
pleted the study of his profession in the office of Hon. John Harris, of Hopkinton, he 
commenced the practice of the law in that town in 1809. He represented the town of 
Hopkinton in the Legislature in 1814, '15, '16, '17, '18, '19, and '20, and was Speaker of 
the House of Representatives the last three years. He was elected Senator from 
Senatorial District No. 8 in 1825, '26, and '27, and was elected President of that body 
in each of those years. In 1821, he was elected a member of Congress, and was 
re-elected for a second term in 1823. In 1828, he was elected Councillor from the Hills- 
borough Councillor District, and again in 1829. He was elected Governor of the State 
in 1830, and, the same year, was appointed Judge of the District Court of the United 
States for the District of New-Hampshire, which office he held until his death. In 1850, 
he removed to Concord, where he died. The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was 
conferred upon him in 1855 by Dartmouth College. Gov. Harvey was a man of the most 
unexceptionable character in all the relations of life. In private life, in public office, 
as a man and a Christian gentleman, his example was ever for good. He died April 7, 
1856, aged eighty-four years. 

t Col. John H. Steele was a native of Salisbury, North Carolina. He was by trade a 
machinist. Following his vocation at Peterborough, he became an extensive manufac- 
turer. He represented the town of Peterborough in 1829, and was elected Councillor 
from the Hillsborough District in 1840 and '11. He was elected Governor of Xew- 
Hampsbire in 1844, and again in 1845. Col. Steele was a positive man, and one of 
industry and great energy of character. He was somewhat eccentric in manner and 
action, bat ever bore the character of an upright and honorable man. He died at Peter- 
borough, July 4, 1865. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 263 

DIVISION INSPECTOR. 

Charles Howard. 

SECOND DIVISION, SECOND AND SIXTH BRIGADES. 

Jonathan Pool, Major-General. 
John B. Chapman, Aide-de-eamp. 
John L. Bnnce, Aide-de-camp. 
Joshua Blaisdell, Division-Inspector. 

THIRD DIVISION, FOURTH AND FIFTH BRIGADES. 

Justus Perry, Major-General. 
Richard Montague, Aide-de-camp. 
Sumner Wheeler, Aide-de-camp. 
William Ains worth, Division-Inspector. 

BRIGADE AND STAFF OFFICERS — FIRST DIVISION, FIRST BRIGADE. 

Theo. A. Burley, Brigadier-General. 
Winthrop Pickering, Aide-de-camp. 
John Pickering, Brigade-Inspector. 
Temple Paul, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Samuel T. Gilman, Judge-Advocate. 

THIRD BRIGADE. 

James Blake, Brigadier-General. 
Ephraim Hutchins, Aide-de-camp. 
Stephen Brown, Brigade-Inspector. 
Irad Brickett, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Josiah Houghton, Judge-Advocate. 

SECOND DIVISION, SECOND BRIGADE. 

Henry Hyde, Brigadier-General. 
James W. Pike, Aide-de-camp. 
Obadiah Stoddard, Brigade-Inspector. 
Brigade Quartermaster, vacant. 
James Bell,* Judge-Advocate. 

* Maj. James Bell was a son of Ex-Go v. Samuel Bell, of Chester, where he was 
born in 1804. He graduated at Bowdoin College in the class of 1822. He read law 
in the office of his brother, Samuel Dana Bell (see notice on pages 256 and 257), then 
practising in Chester. In 1825 he was appointed Quartermaster of the Seventeenth 



264 adjutant-general's report. 

sixth brigade. 

David Culver, Brigadier-General. 
Abijah Topliff, Aide-de-camp. 
Barron Moulton, Brigade-Inspector. 
James Hamilton, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Ira Goodall, Judge-Advocate. 

THIRD DIVISION, FOURTH BRIGADE. 

Solomon McNeil,* Brigadier-General. 
Mark Woodbury, Aide-de-camp. 
James Butler, Brigade-Inspector. 
John M. Wilson,f Brigade Quartermaster. 
Charles F. Gove,! Judge- Advocate. 

Regiment, and the same year entered the bar, and commenced the practice of his profes- 
sion at Gilmanton. In 1827 he was appointed Judge-Advocate as above, and held the 
office until 1831, when he removed to Exeter, where he soon gained an extensive prac- 
tice, and a high reputation as an advocate. In 1846 he represented his adopted town in 
the Legislature. In 1848 he removed to Gilford, having been appointed Agent of " The 
Lake Company." In 1850 he was a Delegate from that town to the Convention for 
amending the Constitution of the State. In June, 1855, he was elected a Senator from 
this State, for the term of six years, in the United States Senate; but served but a part 
of his term, as he died at his residence, May 26, 1857, aged fifty-three years. Mr. Bell 
was a gentleman of quiet deportment and affable manner, a sound lawyer and eloquent 
advocate, and destined for higher positions in the State had his life been spared. 

* Gen. Solomon McNeil was the son of Lieut. John McNeil (see Adjutant-General's 
Report, vol. ii., for 1866, p. 118), and was born at Hillsborough, Jan. 15, 1782. He 
was engaged in mercantile pursuits a great part of his life, and was a pattern farmer, 
residing the latter part of his life upon the old homestead. He was appointed Major 
of the First Battalion of the Twenty-sixtb Regiment in 1815, Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
same June, 1816, and Colonel, June, 1823. He was appointed Brigadier-General of the 
Fourth Brigade June, 1827, and Major-General of the Third Division in June, 1831, 
Which office he resigned in 1833. Gen. McNeil, like his brother, Gen. John McNeil of 
the United States Army (see Adjutant-General's Report, vol. ii., for 1866, p. 118), was 
remarkable for his stature, being "six feet three in his stockings." He held his 
strength and activity in a remarkable degree in his old age, and at seventy-six years of 
age could perform feats of strength and agility hardly attainable by most men at forty. 
He was a man of somewhat eccentric habits, and fond of joke and repartee, those 
marked characteristics of the " Scotch-Irish." Gen. McNeil died Oct. 8, 1862, in the 
eighty-first year of his age. 

t John McNeil Wilson, of Bedford, was a son of James and Mary (McNeil) Wilson, of 
Francestown. After graduating and reading law, he relinquished literary for mercan- 
tile pursuits, and kept a store in Amherst. Not succeeding to his wishes, he resumed 
the practice of his profession at Bedford. Subsequently he practised his profession at 
Lowell, Mass., in company with John A. Knowles, Esq., of that city. After a resi- 
dence in Lowell for some time, he removed to Chicago, 111., where for some years he 
was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of that State, and subsequently Chief 
Justice of the same. 

t Maj. Charles Frederic Gove was of Goffstown, the son of Dr. Jonathan Gove of 
that town, where he was bom May 13, 1793. He graduated at Dartmouth College in 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 265 



FIFTH BRIGADE. 

Erastus Glidden, Brigadier-General. 
William H. Cheney, Aide-de-camp. 
Zenas Clement, Brigade-Inspector. 
Benj. B. French, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Larkin G. Mead, Judge-Advocate. 

REGIMENTAL FIELD-OFFICERS. 

1. Brackett Hutchins, Colonel. 

Gideon W. Walker, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Nathaniel March, Major. 

2. Richard Bailey, Colonel. 

Samuel Dunn, jr., Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John P. Plumer, Major. 

3. John Locke, Colonel. 

Jonathan Marston, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jeremiah Lane, Major. 

4. Abraham Plumer, Colonel. 
Jabez Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Enoch B. Hook, Major. 

5. Levi Jones, Colonel. 

Stephen Peabody, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Israel Hunt, jr., Major. 

the class of 1817, and from the Law School of Harvard College in 1820. He commenced 
the practice of his profession in his native town the same year. In 1821 he was ap- 
pointed Adjutant of the Ninth Regiment. He was Assistant Clerk of the House of 
Representatives in 1829, and represented the town of Gofistown in the Legislature 
in 1830, '31, '32, '33, and '34; was appointed Judge-Advocate of the Fourth Brigade 
in 1822, and held the office until 1834; was appointed Solicitor for the County of Hills- 
borough in 1834, and held the office until 1837, when he was appointed Attorney-General 
of the State. In 1839 he removed to Nashua. He held the office of Attorney-General 
until 1842, when he was appointed to the bench of the Court of Common Pleas. He 
held this office until 1848, when impaired health demanded a less sedentary life ; and he 
resigned his office of Judge to accept that of Superintendent of the Nashua and Lowell 
Railroad. Continued ill-health forced him to resign this office ; and he died at Nashua 
Oct. 21, 1856, aged sixty-three years. 

Judge Gove, in private and public life, sustained the character of an upright, honor- 
able man. Ever of a slender constitution, yet his industry and energy led him to fill 
the various public offices with which he was honored with credit to himself and to the 
general acceptation of the public. He was equally firm in his friendship and in his 
enmity. 






266 adjutant-general's report. 

6. Amos Bennet, Colonel. 

Ballou Swan, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
David Aldrich, Major. 

7. Oren Spofford, Colonel. 

Aaron Quimby, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Humphrey C. Cogswell, Major. 

8. Enoch Marsh, Colonel. 

Josiah Stowell, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John Crocker, Major. 

9. William P. Kiddle,* Colonel. 
Daniel Farmer, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Edmund Johnson, Major. 

10. Timothy Dow, Colonel. 

Dixi Crosby,f Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Daniel Moulton, Major. 

11. Simeon Stevens, Colonel. 

John Carter, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John Putney, Major. 

12. Jason B. Berry, Colonel. 

Oliver Bailey, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Seth Towns, Major. 

13. Alanson Stark, Colonel. 

Edward M. Bissell, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Benjamin Clement, Major. 

* Col. William P. Riddle is the son of Isaac Kiddle of Bedford, and was born April 

6, 1789, and has followed mercantile pursuits a large part of bis life, at the same time 
being a successful farmer. He was appointed Captain of the Bedford Grenadiers, Dec. 
20, 1815, at the organization of the company; promoted Major of the Ninth Regiment, 
May 19, 1820; Lieutenant-Colonel, June 23, 1821; Colonel, June 15, 1824; appointed 
Brigadier-General of the Fourth Brigade, June 21, 1831 ; promoted Major-General, 
June 25, 1833, and resigned June 8, 1825. He represented the town of Bedford in the 
Legislature in 1847 and in 1848. Upon the formation of the Battalion of Amoskeag 
Veterans, in 185-, Gen. Riddle was chosen Commander of the same, with rank of 
Colonel, and is now an active member of that corps. Gen. Riddle has through life been 
an active, enterprising man, and now (April 6, 1868), at the age of seventy-nine years, 
is enjoying good health and spirits, with the respect of the community at large. 

t Col. Dixi Crosby was of Gilmanton, the son of Dr. Asa Crosby, and was born Feb. 

7, 1800. He graduated at the Medical College at Hanover, 1824, and settled as a phy- 
sician at Gilmanton, in 1824. He was appointed Adjutant of the Tenth Regiment in 
June, 1828; promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, June, 1830; Colonel, 1835, and resigned 1S38. 
In 1838, Dr. Crosby was appointed Professor of Surgery and Surgical Anatomy in Dart- 
mouth College, and removed to Hanover, where he still resides, enjoying the reputa- 
tion of a learned and skilful physician. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 267 

14. Moses Cook, Colonel. 

Nathan Baker, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Oliver Flanders, Major. 

15. Hosea Booth, Colonel. 

Charles Eggleston, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Lawrence A. Grannis, Major. 

16. Ezra J. Glidden,* Colonel. 
Samuel McCrea, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jesse Slader, Major. 

17. Coffin M. French, Colonel. 
Daniel Eobie, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John Todd, Major. 

18. Benjamin L. Locke, Colonel. 
Thomas Sweat, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Coker Yeasey, Major. 

19. Asaph Adams, Colonel. 

John H. Moulton, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph L. Quimby, Major. 

20. Benjamin F. Adams, Colonel. 
David Buffum, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Harrison Rugg, Major. 

21. Moody A. Pillsbury, Colonel. 
Joseph Swett, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William M. Pingry, Major. 

22. Samuel King, Colonel. 

Norton Hunt, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Oliver Barrett, Major. 

23. Anson South worth, Colonel. 
Alvan Tubbs, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Samuel Woodbury, Major. 



* Col. Ezra J. Glidden is of Unity. He was appointed Captain of the Seventh Com- 
pany of Infantry in the Sixteenth Regiment, April 14, 1824; promoted Major, July 1, 
1829; and Colonel, June 22, 1830. He represented the town of Unity in the Legisla- 
ture in 1851 and '52. He was President of the New-Hampshire Agricultural Society in 
its palmy days, being well known as one of the enterprising farmers of Sullivan 
County. 



268 adjutant-general's report. 

24. John Lucas, Colonel. 

Joseph Colby, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Eoswell Hobart, Major. 

25. Samuel Demeritt, Colonel. 
Gardner Towle, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William Thompson, Major. 

26. Paul Cragin, Colonel. 

John Bartlett, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph Kimball, Major. 

27. Carr Leavitt, Colonel. 

Joseph V. Quarles, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph Drake, jr., Major. 

28. Asa Wentworth, jr., Colonel. 
Smith Hurd, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Daniel Mack, Major. 

29. Daniel Sanborn, jr., Colonel. 

Simeon Wadleigh, jr., Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Taylor P. Hanniford, Major. 

30. Anthony Colby, Colonel. 

Nathaniel W. Presby, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John Farmer, Major. 

31. Nathan Emery, Colonel. 

Calvin Kempton, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph Lear, Major. 

32. Joel Briggs, Colonel. 

Alden Maffit, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Benjamin Paddleford, Major. 

33. Nehemiah Morrison, Colonel. 

John T. Churchill, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
James Garvin, Major. 

34. John S. Bryant, Colonel. 
Rufus Pike, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Josiah Norris, Major. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 269 

85. Ira Brown, Colonel. 

Isaac Frink, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Thomas J. Parsons, Major. 

36. Ezra H. Meserve, Colonel. 
Benjamin Bean, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
David H. Chandler, Major. 

37. Josiah P. Barber, Colonel. 

Elijah Blaisdell, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Fauntleroy Caswell, Major. 

38. Eichard Brown, Colonel. 
Eliphalet Wood, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Simeon Cate, Major. 

39. John Meserve, Colonel. 

Otis Stackpole, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Daniel Waldron, Major. 

40. Asa Kimball, Colonel. 

Hiram Dimond, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Isaac Dalton, jr., Major. 



THE INDIAN STREAM WAR. 

The Indian Stream Territory is that portion of the terri- 
tory of New-Hampshire lying above the parallel of 45° north 
latitude, and between Hall's River and the Connecticut. 
In 1789, a committee was appointed by the Legislature of 
this State to establish the boundary lines between the 
District of Maine, the Province of Lower Canada, and 
New-Hampshire. This committee performed their duty, 
established the boundaries, and marked them by suitable 
monuments. 

They made the head of Hall's River the northwest bound 
of our State, according to the true construction of the treaty 
of 1783. Hall's River is the northwest branch of the river 
Connecticut. This survey included all of the Indian Stream 
Territory. The next year, two families established them- 
selves on Indian River, or " Indian Stream," as it is gen- 



270 adjutant-general's report. 






erally called, which rises in the highlands between Canada 
and New-Hampshire, and, running south through nearly 
the middle of the territory west of the Connecticut, empties 
into the same about six miles northeast of where that river 
receives the waters of its western tributary, Hall's River. 
" Indian Stream " gives the name to the territory through 
which it thus passes, embracing the lands on each side of 
the same. Other families followed, led there by the fer- 
tility of the soil, or still more, perhaps, from the fact that 
it was distant from the pale of the law, as well as from that 
of civilization. In the course of a few years, it became the 
asylum of debtors avoiding importuning creditors, and 
criminals dreading or escaping from justice. As in most 
frontier settlements, the materials were often bad, and 
mostly crude and disjointed. As the population increased, 
however, the character of the people improved, but, as usual, 
the bad, crude, and disjointed materials showed themselves 
in the structure, and often to its great disparagement. 

In 1812, the settlement became the asylum for smug- 
glers ; its distance from the other settlements of the State 
being so great, and the settlements in Canada so near, that 
detection was often impossible, and the " Indian Stream" 
became noted as a channel of illicit intercourse. A single 
man could readily " bring hundreds of dollars' worth of 
silks and satins into the settlement in his pack," and an 
" Indian sledge " would " bring thousands' worth of the 
same commodities through the woods in winter," and no 
one the wiser for pack or sledge load, except some accom- 
plice in the settlement, ready to secrete smuggler and goods 
in case of necessity. To stop this trade, the government 
had to station a detachment of militia at Stewartstown 
during the summer and fall of 1812, and the spring, sum- 
mer, and fall of 1813, as has already been named. 

Meantime the settlement had been increased by a differ- 
ent element. 

In 1798, Gen. Moody Bedel, of Haverhill, Nathaniel 
Wales, and one other, purchased of certain persons of the 
tribe or nation of the " St. Francis Indians " a tract of land 



MILITARY HISTOEY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 271 

commencing at the mouth of the Ammonoosuck River in 
Haverhill, thence straight eastwardly south of the White 
Mountains to Great Ossipee River, where it crosses the 
boundary line of New-Hampshire and Massachusetts (now 
Maine), thence on a straight line to the boundary line 
between the United States and Canada, as established by 
treaty, thence to Connecticut River, and thence down said 
river to the bound first mentioned. 

This purchase was called " Philip's Grant" from the fact 
that it was alleged one Philip, an Indian and Sagamore of 
the Pigwocket tribe, but united with the St. Francis tribe, 
negotiated the purchase and signed the deed of the same. 
This Indian was known for a long time by the people in the 
northern and eastern part of the State as " King Philip." 
In 1804, Wales settled upon the purchase on the east 
bank of the Connecticut, near the " Indian Stream Settle- 
ment," and Bedel followed in 1811. They made an 
important acquisition to the settlements in that neighbor- 
hood, as they had means ; made roads, built bridges, made 
other improvements, and made great efforts to induce emi- 
grants to settle the territory. The war that soon followed 
took Gen. Bedel from the settlement, and the affairs of 
p Philip's Grant" went to ruin for want of a manager, at 
least for a time. " In 1820, Gen. Bedel again commenced 
a settlement in the territory at ' Bedel's Point,' nine miles 
in advance of any other settlers, and but about three miles 
from the outlet of Connecticut Lake." But, after a resi- 
dence of five years, he gave up the enterprise, and contented 
himself with making surveys in the territory and attempting 
to get " Philip's Grant " confirmed by the Legislature. He 
was led to do this from the fact that, while engaged in pros- 
ecuting his settlement, the Legislature had been induced 
to ignore his Indian title by legislative action in 1820, and 
again in 1824 ; in the latter year quieting each settler in 
his " claim," if it did not exceed two hundred acres. Gen. 
Bedel had faced the cannon's mouth at " the sortie of Erie," 
but he could not successfully face the speculators and in- 
terested parties, however, about the Legislature. His peti- 



272 

tions of 1828, '30, '34, and '35 for the confirmation of 
" Philip's Grant " were unheeded, and his title again 
ignored. The State claimed the lands, refused to part with 
its interest in them ; and these lands, that might have 
made the old age of a brave soldier cheerful and comfort- 
able, have been frittered away with but very little advantage 
to the State. 

After the settlements on this territory had thus lingered 
along with but slow increase or progress for thirty years, a 
new element of discord was thrown among them. In 1819, 
the British and American commissioners attempted to 
establish the boundary line between New-Hampshire and 
the Province of Canada, but they could not agree upon the 
most western branch of Connecticut River. The American 
commissioners held that Hall's River was the one intended 
in the treaty, while the British commissioners pretended to 
be equally sure that it was not the one intended ; and thus 
commenced the difficulty between the American and British 
governments as to our northwestern boundary line. The 
British were evidently in the wrong, which was conceded by 
the Ashburton Treaty. In consequence of this disagree- 
ment, the local authorities of Canada claimed all the land 
west of Indian River, or between that river and Hall's 
River, being one half of the " Indian Stream Territory." 
This claim had its advocates and opposers among the inhab- 
itants of the territory. The Provincial Government of 
Canada at one time located a township east of Hereford, on 
a portion of this territory, at least upon paper, by the name 
of Drayton ; built a road from Hall's River to the Indian 
"River ; and in 1831 required the inhabitants to perform 
military duty. The inhabitants were mainly from Maine, 
New-Hampshire, and Yermont, though portions of them 
were from other States. As best suited their purposes, 
some of them claimed to belong at one time to Yermont, 
at another to Maine, then to the United States, then to 
Great Britain, and last to be a territory distinct from 
the United States or Great Britain ; yet the govern- 
ment of New Hampshire exercised its control there, and its 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 273 



officers executed the processes of the courts there as occa- 
sion required. At length, increase of numbers and partisan- 
ship led certain of them to talk of resistance to the govern- 
ment of New-Hampshire. This portion of the community, 
however, were those and their abettors who had become 
amenable to the laws of this State by their crimes or mis- 
demeanors. However, by establishing municipal regula- 
tions among themselves, sustained by the majority and a 
better public opinion, they succeeded in maintaining good 
order generally in the settlement. But, with such discord- 
ant materials and an increasing population, such a state 
of things could not long exist. The number of inhabitants 
was now between four hundred and five hundred; a number, 
in a well-regulated community, sufficient to insure unprin- 
cipled demagogues, men ambitious of rule, and men never 
so happy as when stirring up contention and strife. 

It was understood between the two governments that, 
pending the settlement of the boundary question, neither 
should extend their jurisdiction farther over the disputed 
territory; but, in face of this understanding, the Canadian 
Government, through their local officers, compelled the in- 
habitants to perform military duty in 1831, and their civil 
magistrates attempted to exercise their functions there. 
These attempts at control, on the part of the Provincial Gov- 
ernment of Canada, of course produced much excitement 
among the inhabitants from the States, and they applied to 
their friends in the States for assistance ; but, receiving no 
great encouragement, they began to talk of forming an 
independent government for themselves. Meantime the 
indiscreet action, to call it by no harsher name, of two of 
the officials of New-Hampshire and Vermont, tended not a 
little to embarrass and excite the people of this settlement. 
They had ever carried their produce into Canada, and of 
course into the States, free of duty; but, in December, 1831, 
Gen. Lewis Loomis of New-Hampshire, and Theophilus Grant 
of Vermont, officers of the customs of the United States, 
exacted duties from the people of the Indian Stream Terri- 
tory who brought their produce into New-Hampshire or 
18 



274 adjutant-general's report. 

Vermont, holding and proclaiming that these people were 
without the jurisdiction of the United States. They de- 
manded duties to be paid, or required bonds for the payment 
of the same. Deeming these exactions illegal, several of 
the inhabitants took loads of produce into Vermont, and 
passed the Custom-house without stopping to pay duties ; 
but their loads were seized and they forced to pay the duties, 
Mr. Grant refusing to take bonds for the same because they 
had passed his office. In fact, one man was obliged by Mr. 
Grant, it was alleged, to pay the money after he had entered 
his produce at the Collector's office. These proceedings, 
originating in cupidity and clearly illegal on the part of 
Loomis and Grant (as they were afterwards ordered by the 
Secretary of the Treasury to refund the money and give up 
the bonds), excited the people of the territory to a great 
degree, and afforded the malcontents and designing full 
scope for prosecuting their intentions. Some were for join- 
ing the Canadian province, others for seeking redress from 
the government of New-Hampshire, but the majority seemed 
decided upon an independent government for the territory 
until such time as the difficulty as to the boundary question 
should be settled. 

Accordingly, on the 9th of July, 1832, the inhabitants of 
the territory, by notification, met, and, after discussion and 
deliberation, decided to establish an independent govern- 
ment, and adopted a constitution, which provided for an 
Assembly, consisting of all qualified voters of the territory ; 
and a Council, to consist of five members to be chosen by 
the Assembly, and to constitute the executive department. 
This government was to exist until such time as the line 
should be established, and the people should know to what 
government they belonged. The officers were duly chosen 
under this constitution, and the government of " The United 
Inhabitants of Indian Stream Territory" put in operation. 

A minority of the inhabitants were opposed o this pro- 
cedure, and still adhered to the government of Xew-Hamp. 
shire ; and these, of course, had no control in the new 
government. Much excitement ensued, as the new gov- 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 275 

ernment determined to resist the serving of any process 
from the courts in New-Hampshire. Mr. Sheriff White,* 
of Lancaster, in the County of Coos, finding that he or his 
deputies were to be resisted in the performance of their du- 
ties, addressed a letter to the Secretary of the State of New- 
Hampshire, detailing the circumstances and asking for instruc- 
tions. This communication was laid before the Governor 
and Council, and they determined to ask the opinion of the 
Attorney-General upon the subject. This was given, sus- 
taining our right to the territory and to jurisdiction over 
the same. A copy of the opinion of the Attorney- General 
was sent to Mr. Sheriff White, together with a letter from 
His Excellency the Governor coinciding with the opinion 
of the Attorney-General, and expressing a determination to 
see the laws of the State executed. Copies of these papers 
were inclosed by Col. White to the malcontents of Indian 
Stream. 

This was in December, 1834, and for a time the inhab- 
itants seemed to submit. But they had bad advisers. One 
Alexander Rea, of Hereford, Lower Canada, a town adja- 
cent to the Indian Stream Territory (a Justice of the Peace 
under the Provincial Government), and one Cumin gs, of 
Canaan, Yt., seem to have advised them to resistance. Rea 
was very active in the affairs of the territory, and seemed 
determined to make trouble, with a view of bringing the 
territory and its people under the Provincial Government. 
Thus advised, and the advice tallying with their own 
intentions, at a public meeting they voted to abide by 
their constitution, and to resist the laws of New-Hampshire. 

* Col. John H. White was the son of Moses White of Rutland, Mass., where he was 
born, April 19, 1792. Col. Moses White, the father, served through the war of the 
Revolution upon the staff of Gen. Moses Haten. Col. John H. White moved to Lan- 
caster in 181-, and followed the vocation of a farmer. He was Adjutant of the Twenty- 
fourth Regiment in 1821, '22, and '23; Major of the same in 1824, and Colonel in 1825 
and '26, when he resigned. In 1830, June 28, he was appointed Sheriff of the County of 
Coos, and resigned in 1838. He was elected Councillor for the Fifth Councillor District 
in 1840, and again in 1841. As Sheriff, during the " Indian Stream" difficulties, his 
duties were arduous and of great responsibility, but he performed them with great 
promptness, and at the same time judiciously. A man with less care and prudence 
might have greatly increased our border difficulties. Col. White was a man of the 
strictest integrity in all his acts, and died with the respect of the community at large 
April 13, 1865, in the seventy- third year of his age. 



276 adjutant-general's report. 

Accordingly, on the 12th of March, 1835, WilliamM. Smith, 
a deputy sheriff of Coos County, on attempting to arrest 
Clarke J. Haines and Reuben Sawyer, was resisted in his 
attempt by several men, and violently beaten and driven 
from the territory. On the next day, Milton Harvey, in 
attempting to attach property of a citizen of Indian Stream 
Territory, was violently opposed and his assistant beaten, 
and both forced to leave the territory. Such being the 
state of affairs, Mr. Sheriff White addressed a letter to 
the Secretary of the State of New-Hampshire detailing" the 
facts, and asking a detachment of troops from the Twenty- 
fourth Regiment of Militia, to assist him in the service of 
processes from the courts of Coos County. In his letter of 
March 30,1835, Col. White says: "They are determined to 
resist the officers of the State to the utmost of their ability. 
They are now making preparations for repulsing any force 
which may be brought against them. I am credibly in- 
formed that they are building a block-building which they 
call a jail. Undoubtedly it is a place to intrench themselves 
in, should force be brought against them. Probably there 
is not another place in the United States, of its numbers, 
which contains more desperadoes ; and it is believed that 
there are a number among them that would prefer death, 
rather than to come under our laws. They have completely 
intimidated those who prefer wholesome laws, and felt a 
desire to have the State take jurisdiction there. ... I 
would mention the circumstance that these people have in 
their ranks twelve or fourteen Indians, who, I am told, 
have engaged to assist them in case of trouble." 

After the resistance and ill-treatment of the officers of 
this State on the 12th and 13th of March, anticipating that 
the government of New-Hampshire would be notified of 
this state of affairs, the inhabitants of the territory held a 
public meeting, and chose John Haines as an agent to visit 
Mr. Sheriff White as to the affair. Mr. Haines was duly 
authorized by the " Council of Indian Stream," as follows : — 

" At a special meeting of the inhabitants of Indian Stream 
held on the 20th instant, passed a resolve unanimously to 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 277 

abide by and support our own constitution and laws, agree- 
ably to our oaths, until known to what government we prop- 
erly belong, when our constitution is at an end. And, 
understanding that the High Sheriff of the County of Coos, 
in the State of New-Hampshire, by being misinformed or 
otherwise, has directed his deputies to serve precepts on 
persons and property in this place, therefore said inhabi- 
tants have chosen John Haines, of said Indian Stream, to 
converse with said sheriff for information upon this im- 
portant subject. 

" Richard I. Blanchard, 
" William White, 
" Jeremiah Tabor, 
" Abner Hyland, 
" Burleigh Blood, 
" Alanson Cumings, 
" E. C. Sawyer, 

" Councillors of Indian Stream. 
"Indian Stream, March 20, 1835." 

Mr. Haines presented his credentials to Col. White, but 
could get no information from him save that he would place 
the situation of affairs before the Governor and Council of 
New-Hampshire, and they would probably take such action 
in the premises as would be just and proper. Col. White 
redeemed his promise by writing the letter of the 30th of 
March, from which the extract is given above. 

On the 18th of April, the Assembly of Indian Stream met 
and passed an act making it perjury for violating the oath 
of allegiance to the Constitution of Indian Stream, and at- 
taching as a penalty therefor disqualification as a witness in 
the courts of the territory, and confinement in the stocks 
not exceeding six hours. They also passed an act forbid- 
ding any sheriff, his deputy or other officer, residing in the 
territory of Indian Stream, or within the United States, and 
not appointed by the government of Indian Stream, per- 
forming the duties of such officer within the territory, upon 
penalty of paying a fine of one hundred dollars for each 






278 adjutant-general's report. 

offence, and to be imprisoned until paid, at the discretion of 
the court. 

Such a law as the last exposed the sinister motives of the 
malcontents. They legislated against the officers of the 
United States performing their duties within the territory, 
but had not a word of objection against those of the Prov- 
ince of Canada 1 They could come into the territory, make 
arrests, and force the inhabitants to perform military duty 
when they pleased ! Their object was plain. Their so- 
called " Government of Indian Stream " was established 
under the auspices of the Provincial Government. 

On the 18th of April, 1835, the minority of the people 
of the Indian Stream Territory sent a petition to the Gov- 
ernor of New-Hampshire, describing the government of 
the malcontents and some of their laws, exposing their 
hypocrisy, and asking to be protected. 

Soon after, the majority sent a petition also, in which they 
attempted to palliate their conduct, acknowledged they had 
reported their affairs to the Provincial Government, abused 
their opponents, and asked the favorable consideration of 
His Excellency. 

The Governor, His Excellency William Badger, laid the 
papers before the Legislature in June by special message. 
They were referred to a select committee, and that com- 
mittee reported the following resolutions : — 

u Besolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court convened, That the State of New-Hampshire should continue 
the possession of the Indian Stream Territory, and maintain the 
jurisdiction of the State over the same, until the question of boun- 
daries, now in dispute between the United States and Great 
Britain, affecting the limits of said territory, shall be fully 
settled, and his Excellency the Governor be requested to render 
all necessary aid to the executive officers of the County of Coos 
in causing the laws of said State to be duly executed within the 
limits of said territory. 

" Resolved, That it is inexpedient for the State, during the pen- 
dency of the controversy in relation to said boundaries, to make 
any disposition of the interest of the State in the lands of said 
Indian Stream Territory." 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 279 

These resolutions were not only decisive as to the affairs 
of the Indian Stream Territory, but also as to the petition 
of Gen. Bedel to have his grant from King Philip con- 
firmed. The State would control the Indian Stream Ter- 
ritory, and would not part with its interest in the same, 
during the pending question as to boundaries. The parties 
governed themselves accordingly. Gen. Bedel sold his 
claim, the malcontents at Indian Stream made preparations 
for resisting the laws of New-Hampshire, and the Execu- 
tive of that State determined to maintain jurisdiction over 
the Indian Stream Territory at all hazards. 

The action of the Legislature and the determination of 
the Executive were duly communicated to Col. White, and 
by him to the malcontents at Indian Stream. The immedi- 
ate effect was to produce quiet for a time, but at length the 
Provincial Government began openly to show its hand. One 
McRea, a justice of the Province of Lower Canada, issued 
warrants in the name of the King, and they were duly 
served in the territory. Not content with this, he notified 
meetings of the inhabitants at two several times, and made 
inflammatory speeches to them, urging them to resist the 
laws of New-Hampshire, and promising them the assistance 
of the Provincial Government in such event. 

The war of words continued warm, but harmless, until 
October, 1835, when it culminated in a collision. Of this 
affair the commissioners of New-Hampshire, sent to inves- 
tigate the matter, thus report: "In October, 1835, Wil- 
liam M. Smith, a Deputy Sheriff of Coos County, had a writ 
put into his hands for service against one John H. Tyler, 
an inhabitant of the disputed territory. Smith, not know- 
ing Tyler, and also apprehending some resistance, procured 
one Richard I. Blanchard and John Milton Harvey to 
assist him, and then proceeded to Tyler's house for the pur- 
pose of making service of the writ. Not having found said 
Tyler at his house, they went in pursuit of him, agreeably 
to the directions which they had received, and soon met 
said Tyler. Smith then requested said Tyler to show him 
property, that it might be attached on the writ, which he 






280 adjutant-general's report. 

refused to do. He was arrested by said Smith, who was 
proceeding with said Tyler in custody, when he was forci- 
bly rescued from said Smith's possession by several of the 
inhabitants. 

" Upon this, the individual before referred to, as the occa- 
sion of all the difficulties at this place, issued a warrant in 
the name of the King of Great Britain against said Smith, 
Blanchard, and Harvey for attempting to execute process 
there not issued by authority of the King of Great Britain, 
and sent it into the settlement for the purpose of having it 
served upon the individuals against whom it had issued. 
This was done with a full knowledge of the fact that this 
State had, by a resolution of the Legislature, determined to 
maintain its jurisdiction over the territory until the boun- 
dary line should be definitely and satisfactorily settled. 

"By virtue of this pretended warrant, on the 22d day of 
October, A. D. 1835, said Blanchard was taken from his 
own dwelling-house by an armed body of men, with the 
express and avowed purpose of carrying him into Canada 
for trial, on the absurd charge of having assisted in serv- 
ing a writ duly issued by the competent authority of the 
County of Coos. 

" The news of this outrage was immediately spread 
through the adjacent towns, and excited very great indigna- 
tion against its perpetrators. The inhabitants very gener- 
ally, upon being notified of the fact, expressed a determina- 
tion not to suffer their fellow-citizen thus to be taken from his 
home and carried out of the State, without an attempt at 
least, on their part, to rescue him. In pursuance of this de- 
termination, several citizens of the neighborhood went over 
the line dividing this State from the Province of Lower 
Canada, for the purpose of intercepting those who had said 
Blanchard in custody, and effecting his release. This was 
effected without any violence ; and, so far from being done 
under the direction of any military officer, it was an en- 
tirely spontaneous assembly of citizens, aroused by what 
they deemed a gross outrage upon the rights of one of their 
fellow-citizens, subject to the direction of no military or civil 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 281 

officer of the State. How far this proceeding is to be palli- 
ated or justified, the wisdom of the Legislature may best 
determine. The facts are here stated. After said Blanch- 
ard had been thus rescued, the individuals who had turned 
out for that purpose assembled at the store of Parmelee 
& Joy, in Canaan, Vermont. Among the number was 
William M. Smith, the deputy sheriff before spoken of who 
had previously arrested one John H. Tyler, who had been 
rescued from him in the manner before stated. He then 
offered a reward of five dollars to any one who would deliver 
said Tyler to him. A notion seemed very generally to pre- 
vail among those who were then present that said Tyler, 
having once been legally made a prisoner by the arrest of 
said Smith, might be retaken again wherever he could be 
found. This John H. Tyler was one of those who had 
had Blanchard in custody at the time he was rescued in the 
manner before stated. After Smith, the deputy sheriff, had 
offered this reward for the recapture of said Tyler, several 
of the individuals, who had left their homes for the avowed 
and express purpose of rescuing Blanchard, unadvisedly 
and improperly went over the line for the purpose of retak- 
ing Tyler, they having at that time the impression that they 
were justified in so doing. No sooner were these individ- 
uals over the line than they were set upon in a furious, 
boisterous, and outrageous manner by the individual before 
referred to as the cause of all the difficulty at the Indian 
Stream settlement, and the very individual who had issued 
the warrant by which Blanchard had been dragged from 
home as before stated. 

" This individual came upon them while they were peace- 
ably and quietly demeaning themselves, having offered or 
threatened violence to no one, and ordered them off the high- 
way, and attempted to make prisoners of them, and called 
upon those who were with him to assist. The New-Hamp- 
shire citizens, not relishing the idea of thus being made 
prisoners, resisted, and, being assaulted with great violence 
by the inhabitants of Canada, their horses' bridles seized 
and stones thrown violently at them, defended themselves 



282 

with such arms as they had with them, having taken them 
at the time they turned out for the rescue of Blanchard. 
We do not undertake to state with accuracy all the particu- 
lars of the skirmish which ensued upon this assault, but we 
are confident in the assertion that the first violence offered 
or threatened was that done to citizens of New-Hampshire 
by citizens of Canada. The result was, that the individual 
who commenced the brawl was violently seized and brought 
over the line into Vermont, and there detained some hours, 
and finally set at large." 

Soon after this affair, a small guard was placed there, by 
order of the Governor, to afford protection to our citizens ; 
but, the excitement still continuing, and the well-disposed 
citizens being in continual fear for their safety (which state 
of affairs was duly communicated to the Executive by an 
agent), Gov. Badger* issued the following order: — 

" STATE OF jSTEW-HAMPSHIBE. 

" Nov. 7, 1835. 
" To Joseph Loiv, Adjutant- General of said State. 

"Sir, — It having been represented to me that a portion of the 
inhabitants of i Indian Stream Territory,' so called, are now in a 
state of insurrection and rebellion against the government and 
laws of the State, and some military force being necessary (if the 
representations are true) to quell the insurrectionary movements, 
and restore order and regularity in the territory, and confidence 
in the laws of the State, I, therefore, wish you to repair to the 
spot with all reasonable expedition, ascertain the situation of the 

* His Excellency William Badger was the son of Gen. William Badger, of Gilnian- 
ton, where he was born in the year 1780. He was a farmer, as was his father. He 
represented the town of Gilmanton in the Legislature in 1810, '11, and '12. He was 
the Senator from District No. 6 in 1814, '15, and '16, and was President of that body 
in the latter year. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas in 1816, and held the office until 1820. May 19, 1820, he was appointed Sheriff of 
the County of Strafford, and served in that capacity two terms, until 1830. Judge 
Badger was chosen Governor of the State for the years 1834 and '35. He held for 
many years the minor offices of his town, and was three times chosen to the Boards 
of Electors of President and Vice-President of the United States. Gov. Badger was a 
man of sound judgment and the strictest integiity, and, when determined upon a 
course of action, not to be swerved from it. His course upon the difficulties of " The 
Indian Stream Territory " received the hearty commendation of all parties, and, 
doubtless, saved us from a greater difficulty, — a war with Great Britain. He died Sept. 
21, 1853, aged seventy-three years. 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 283 

inhabitants as to their disobedience and rebellion against the State 
and its laws, and, if necessary, order out so much of the Twenty- 
fourth Keglment as will enable the executive officers of the county 
of Coos to execute the laws, and suppress and put down all insur- 
rectionary movements, and restore order and submission to the 
laws of the State. And if, after advising- with such friends as you 
can rely on, you should think the interests of the State and the 
safety of the inhabitants require a military guard to be stationed 
there, you will make the necessary arrangements. You will con- 
tinue as long and make such regulations as you, in your discre- 
tion, may think necessary. You will, therefore, be governed in 
your procedure by the circumstances that may hereafter occur, 
which now cannot be foreseen. 

" With much respect, 

i i Your obedient servant, 

"WILLIAM BADGER." 

In obedience to this order, Adjutant-General Low pro- 
ceeded forthwith to the " Indian Stream Territory," and, 
finding things in a worse state even than had been repre- 
sented, he immediately issued the following order to Col. 
Ira Young,* of the Twenty-fourth Regiment : — 

"STATE OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 

"Indian Stream Settlement, Nov. 13, 1835. 
" General Orders. 

"Ira Young, Esq., Colonel of the Twenty-fourth Regiment of 
the Militia of said State, will please to detach and order into ser- 
vice, and place at the disposal of John H. White, Esq., Sheriff of 
the County of Coos, one captain, one lieutenant, one ensign, four 
sergeants, two musicians, and forty-two privates, for three months, 
unless sooner discharged. 

" By order of His Excellency the Commander-in-chief. 

"JOSEPH LOW, 

" Adjutant- General." 

* Col. Ira Young was of Lancaster. He was born in Lisbon in 1794, and was the son 
of Col. Samuel Young, a very successful farmer and prominent man of that town. 

The son read law in the office of James I, Swan, of Bath, and, when Mr. Swan died, 
about 1821, took his office and succeeded to his business; a sort of mutual arrangement, 
as Mr. Swan bequeathed him his extensive law -library. Mr. Young continued in the 
practice of the law in Lancaster till 1827, when his office, with his library and papers, 
was burned. He then moved to Colebrook and practised his profession, and at the same 
time took an active part in military affairs. He was appointed Captain of the com- 
pany of cavalry in the Twenty-fourth Regiment, July 22, 1829; Major of the Regiment, 
July 21, 1832, and Colonel, June 25, 1833. 



284 adjutant-general's report. 

This order was obeyed with most commendable zeal by 
Col. Young, and, by three o'clock the following morning, 
enough of the detachment ordered out had arrived to war- 
rant Sheriff White in attempting to make arrests in the 
territory. Of the proceedings that followed, the account 
of Gen. Low is given below : — 

" Indian Stream Settlement, 
Nov. 14, 1835. 
" To His Excellency Gov. Badger. 

" Sir, — Upon my arrival in this territory I found the inhabitants 
impressed with a belief that the government of New-Hampshire 
was indifferent as to their jurisdiction over this territory, and that 
no further means would be taken to maintain it; consequently, 
those who had heretofore been friendly to the State were resolved 
at all hazards to resist the laws. 

" I also learned that a party had combined, provided themselves 
with arms, and fortified themselves, with the avowed purpose of 
resisting the laws of the State of New-Hampshire, and claiming 
the protection of the Provincial Government of Lower Canada, 
and that a force was collecting in some of the border towns with 
the design of protecting the disaffected, and of driving from the 
settlement the small guard stationed there. 

" Upon consultation with the High Sheriff, Col. Young, Gen. 
Loomis, Gideon Tirrell, Esq., Luther Parker, and others, who had 
accompanied me here, I had no doubt of the expediency of ordering 
the colonel of the Twenty-fourth Eegiment to detach one captain, 
one lieutenant, one ensign, four sergeants, two musicians, and 
forty-two privates, and to place them at the disposal of the Sheriff 
of the County of Coos. 

"This order was handed to the colonel of the Twenty-fourth 
Regiment last evening about six o'clock, and an express was im- 
mediately dispatched to the commanding officer of the Stewarts- 
town company of infantry, with directions to collect a force as 



In 1835, being in command of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, he was designated to 
lead the detachment ordered out by Gov. Badger to quell the insurrectionary move- 
ment at Indian Stream. He was appointed Brigadier-General of the Sixth Brigade, 
June 16, 1836, and Major-General of the Second Division, June 22, 1837. About 1838 he 
removed to Lancaster. About this time his health began to fail, and in 1845 he went 
to the Island of Cuba in hopes to restore it, where he died. The inscription upon his 
tombstone reads thus : — 

" Gen. Ira Young, died at Havana, Island of Cuba, Nov. 17, A. D. 1S45, aged 51 (fifty- 
one). This stone is erected to his memory as a token of respect, by his brethren of 
the bar, among whom he stood eminent, both for his courtesy and ability as a lawyer, 
and his high character for honor and integrity as a man." 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 285 

early as practicable, and to report to the rendezvous without 
delay. By three o'clock this morning, about twenty had arrived, 
some travelling nineteen miles on foot. 

" Upon our arrival at the first settlement, an individual friendly 
to the malcontents was ascertained to be missing, and was sup- 
posed to have gone to give notice ; but Capt. Mooney, who had 
taken the precaution of guarding all the avenues to the rendez- 
vous of the insurgents, frustrated all attempts to apprise them of 
their danger by arresting a Canadian and one of our own citizens 
in the act of making their way towards the Applebee fortification. 

" About three o'clock this morning, a guard, under command of 
Capt. Mooney, accompanied Mr. Blanchard, a deputy sheriff of 
the settlement, with directions to arrest a number against whom 
the sheriff had warrants for the violation of our laws, a part of 
whom were known to be at the residence of the Applebees, about 
seven miles up the Connecticut, and near the head of that river. 

'■' Upon the approach of the guard, it was discovered that a 
plank of a bridge over the stream near the Applebees' had been 
removed, and that care had been taken to secure the dwelling 
against the penetration of musket-shot. As soon as the guard was 
discovered by the inmates, the two Applebees approached with 
their muskets, and warned the guard and sheriff not to approach 
them. The sheriff informed them that he was an officer, and had 
a warrant against them, and required them in the name of the 
State to lay down their arms and submit ; upon which they lev- 
elled their guns, and declared that instant death awaited any one 
who should dare approach them. 

" At this moment, the captain of the guard informed them of 
the consequences of resistance ; that he came with instructions to 
take them alive, if possible, but at all hazards to take them ; 
whereupon the elder Applebee ordered the guard and sheriff in 
the name of the King to leave his farm, and started a messenger 
to give notice to his associates of his condition ; but, all communi- 
cation being cut off by the position of the guard, the messenger 
was driven back into the house, and the design frustrated. At 
this moment Lewis Loomis, Esq., who was with the guard, 
advised the Applebees that their escape was impossible, and that 
it was most prudent for them to surrender and go with him to the 
proper officers, whom if they could satisfy of the rectitude of their 
intentions, they should be permitted to return. To this they con- 
sented, and the Applebees, their arms, ammunition, and imple- 
ments of defence, are now in the hands of the guard. 

" At the moment of their surrender, several of the insurgents 
came in sight ; but, one only being armed, and the arms of the 
others being captured with the Applebees, they acted upon the 



286 



principle that ' discretion is the better part of valor,' and sud- 
denly disappeared. 

" The guns captured from the Applebees were found to be 
heavily charged with powder, ball, and buck-shot, or rather pistol- 
bullets. One of the guns had seventeen of these bullets. The 
rifle had seven bullets, and the spare guns an ounce-ball each and 
from seven to twelve of the pistol-bullets, all of which are in 
the hands of the High Sheriff, and will in due time be exhibited to 
the Grand Jury of the County. 

" I find upon inquiry that, such has been the doubt and uncer- 
tainty as to the disposition of the government of New-Hampshire 
to maintain jurisdiction over the territory, that, from this and 
other manifest causes, many people, well disposed, despairing of 
protection, had joined the disaffected, and sixty of the seventy-five 
legal voters had petitioned the Provincial Government to take 
them under the protection of the laws of the Crown. 

" Since the arrival of the military force, and the arrest of the 
Applebees, and the knowledge of the measures your Excellency 
has adopted in relation to this troubled section of the State, many 
of those who signed the petition to Lord Gosford have come for- 
ward and given in their allegiance to our government, and express 
great satisfaction that they are to be delivered from the state of 
anarchy which has so long existed. Of this number, Dea. Perkins 
deserves especially to be named to your Excellency. The Apple- 
bees declare that they have acted under the directions of the 
British justice, Rea, and were told by him, if approached by the 
authorities or people of New-Hampshire, to order them in the 
name of the King to desist, but, if further pressed, to fire, and, 
in case they could not defend themselves, to retreat to Hereford, 
and they should be protected." . . . 

The prisoners taken at " The Block-house" of the Apple- 
bees, with others of the insurgents captured, were subse- 
quently taken to Lancaster and lodged in jail, except two 
young men by the name of Huggins, who, young and inex- 
perienced, expressed great regret that they had joined the 
insurgents, and were released upon their own recognizance, 
before leaving the territory of " Indian Stream." Indict- 
ments were found against the prisoners, but their cases were 
continued from term to term, until, showing a repentant 
spirit, and the troubles being somewhat allayed in the dis- 
puted territory, the captured insurgents were discharged 
upon their own recognizance, or otherwise disposed of by 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 287 

the State's attorney and the court. They were not brought 
to trial. Meantime, the troubles at "Indian Stream" were 
not wholly allayed. The "fugitives from justice," the vi- 
cious and lawless among the inhabitants, under the auspices 
of Mr. Justice Rea of Hereford, still fomented strife. The 
better portion of the community, however, sure of the pro- 
tection of the government of New-Hampshire, eventually 
prevailed ; not, however, without the greatest difficulty. 
The British party continued to make their threats, and 
individuals obnoxious to them went into the settlements 
for safety. Gov. Badger, however, continued to act with 
great promptness, and issued an order for calling out another 
detachment of troops, at the discretion of a " Committee of 
Correspondence," and Sheriff White. The knowledge of 
this order had the desired effect. The malcontents thought 
" discretion the better part of valor," and quietly submitted 
to the laws, or emigrated to Canada. Thus, by the prompt 
action of the Executive, this difficulty, that at one time was 
likely to have produced a rupture between the two govern- 
ments, was allayed. The government of the United States 
assumed the responsibility of the embroglio by payment to 
the State of New-Hampshire of the expenses incurred ; and 
the line was established, as claimed by our government, by 
the Webster-Ashburton Treaty. 

The roll of Capt. Mooney's company, called out at Indian 
Stream from the Twenty-fourth Regiment, was as fol- 
lows : — 



288 



adjutant-general's report. 



Eoll of Capt. James Mooney's Company. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residences. 


James Mooney, Captain, 


Oct. 21,1835 


Three months 


Stewartstown. 


Haines French, Lieutenant, 


Nov. 21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Amos W. Drew, Ensign, 


13 


" 


Stewartstown. 


Joseph Durgin, Sergeant, 


18 


a 


NTorthumberland. 


"William Covel, " 


21 


" 


Colebrook or Columbia. 


Robert Thrill, " 


14 


" 


Stewartstown. 


Isaac Miner, " 


19 


" 


Whitefield. 


George Hight, " 


20 


a 


Jefferson. 


PRIVATES. 








Asahel Aldrich, 


Nov. 19,1835 


Three months Whitefield. 


David Alls, 


21 


" 


Colebrook or Columbia. 


James H. Balch, 


19 




Lancaster. 


Thomas Batchelder, 


it 




Whitefield. 


Ephraim F. Bartlett, 


(t 




Whitefield. 


Phill C. Bickford, 


18 




Northumberland. 


Linus Blakester, 


19 




Dalton. 


Arnold Bolls, 


" 




Dal ton. 


Henry Boutwell, 


« 




Dalton. 


William W. Brooks, 


21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Volney M. Brown, 


" 




Stratford. 


Jesse Carr, 


26 




Jefferson. 


Jesse W. Carr, 


21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Nathan S. Carr, 


" 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Hazen Chamberlin, 


<< 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


William Curtis, 


" 




Stratford. 


Nathaniel G. Dodge, 


11 




Stark. 


Ahaz S. French, 


a 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Orisamus Frizzle, 


" 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


William Trimes, 


19 




Dalton. 


Alfred C. Trimleaf, 


20 




Jefferson. 


Samuel G. Grout, 


19 




Dalton. 


Horatio Grover, 


21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Alexander Gulben, 






Colebrook or Columbia. 


Silas Huntoon, 


19 




Whitefield. 


Duglas Ingerson, 


" 




Lancaster. 


Enoch C. Jewell, 


u 




Whitefield. 


Dennis Jones, 


it 




Lancaster. 


Abiel C. Kidder, 


1 




Stewartstown. 


Eli Kinerson, 


21 




Stratford. 


Leavitt Loud, 


19 




Dalton. 


William G. Lymon, 


21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


Clark McForbin, 


a 




Stark. 


Joseph Morrill, jr., 


19 




Whitefield. 


John Perkins, 


it 




Lancaster. 


William Price, 


<< 




Whitefield. 


Benjamin Stilling, 


20 




Jefferson. 


Ira Stilling, 


" 




Jefferson. 


Charles F. Stone, 


19 




Lancaster. 


John Sweat, 


21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 


William Wallace, jr., 


19 




Dalton. 


Asa S. White, 


19 




Whitefield. 


Samuel Whittemore, 


21 




Colebrook or Columbia. 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 289 



THE FLORIDA WAR. 

At the time our border difficulties were at their height, a 
cruel Indian war was raging at the South, known as "the 
Seminole War." The Seminoles were a fierce and warlike 
race of Indians, and occupied the best lands in Florida. In 
1821, Spain formally passed the Floridas to the govern- 
ment of the United States, and immigration immediately 
set into the territory. The lands of the Indians were cov- 
eted by the settlers and speculators ; and soon animosities 
arose between them, encouraged by the whites, that in the 
end produced the most protracted and cruel war known in 
our history. There were continued collisions and massa- 
cres ; and, to stop them and restore peace to the territory, 
our government adopted the policy of removal of the Sem- 
inoles. A treaty was accordingly made with a portion of 
their chiefs, that they should remove at the expense of the 
government to a reservation west of the Mississippi within 
three years. It is very doubtful, had our government car- 
ried out this treaty in good faith, whether the Seminoles as 
a people would have peaceably removed, as the treaty had 
been signed by only a few of their chiefs ; but the govern- 
ment, through its agents, did not act up to the treaty, and 
the Seminoles became greatly infuriated, and, instead of 
removing, commenced a cruel and bloody war, costing the 
nation near thirty millions of money and thousands of val- 
uable lives. It commenced in earnest in 1835, and did not 
end by proclamation until 1848. 

During this long period of varied disaster and success, 
the impatience of our people demanded a succession of com- 
manders for the Florida campaigns ; and we find Gaines, 
Scott, Jessup, Call, Clinch, Taylor, Harney, and Pierce 
bush-fighting among the hummocks, swamps, and ever- 
glades of Florida. But military science and skill were of 
but little account against a foe upon their own soil, and that 
soil producing spontaneously for their subsistence ; every 

bush a covert, every hummock a natural earth-work, and 
19 



290 



every everglade a natural fortification. In such a war, few 
laurels were to be found or won ; yet its hardships, its labors, 
its risks and responsibilities, were far greater than those of 
legitimate wars of civilized life. 

It is not proposed to write up the Florida War in detail, 
but only to notice those actions in which men of New- 
Hampshire took an active part. 



MASSACRE OF MAJ. DADE'S COMMAND. 

The campaign of 1835 was one of disaster, — the most 
noticeable incident being that of Dec. 28, when Maj. Dade 
and his command, consisting, all told, of one hundred and 
eighteen men, were attacked by a party of Indians led by 
Micanopy and the noted Osceola, and the entire party 
killed, with the exception of three privates, who escaped 
and got into Fort Brooke severely wounded. The stout 
resistance made by the Indians during this campaign con- 
vinced the government and the people of Florida that more 
efficient means were necessary, and a much larger force of 
national and State troops were ordered into the field. The 
effective forces of the various forts along the Atlantic sea- 
board, as well as troops stationed in the interior, were 
ordered for service to various forts in Florida. 



THE BATTLE OF FORT DRANE. 

Fort Drane, proving to be in an unhealthy locality, was 
abandoned by our troops, and soon after was taken posses- 
sion of by the enemy, who built their huts in and around it, 
into which they moved their women and children. Maj. B. 
K. Pierce,* of the artillery, had been ordered from Fort 



* Maj. Benjamin Kendrick Pierce was the eldest son of Gov. Benjamin Pierce, and 
was born at Hillsborough, Aug. 29, 1790. He pursued his preparatory studies at Phil- 
lips's Exeter Academy, and entered Dartmouth College in the fall of 1807, and continued 
jn that institution for three years, when he commenced the study of the law with David 
Starrett, Esq., of Hillsborough. He continued in Mr. Starrett's office until the com- 
mencement of the war with Great Britain, when he entered the regular army as a 
lieutenant of artillery. In August, 1813, he was promoted to a captaiucy; in June 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 291 

Mitchel to the command of Fort Micanopy, in the interior 
of Florida. Maj. Pierce arrived at the Fort on the 20th of 
August, 1836 ; and, having learned from Capt. Childs, in 
command, that a body of the enemy were lurking about Fort 
Drane, he determined to attack them forthwith. Accord- 
ingly, at two o'clock on the morning following (the 21st), 
he marched for Fort Drane with 110 mounted men and a 
piece of ordnance, — fifty men commanded by Capt. Childs 
of the Third Artillery, and Lieut. Spaulding of the Second 
Dragoons ; and fifty men commanded by Lieutenants Irwin 
and Herbert, of the First Artillery. The command reached 
Fort Drane at sunrise. The Indians proved to be numer- 
ous, — about three hundred, under the command of their 
noted chief, Powell, better known as Osceola. Our troops 
moved upon the enemy in three divisions, under the direct 
lead of Maj. Pierce, and attacked them with the most 
determined spirit, and, after an hour's hard fighting, drove 
them from the field, and followed them three quarters of a 
mile into their recesses, where they could not be followed 
by our troops, exhausted by their march and hard fighting, 
and in number not more than one third of that of the 
enemy. The Indians on this occasion fought with the most 
obstinate bravery, leaving ten of their dead upon the battle- 
field (an unusual incident), and leaving unmistakable trails 
showing that many others, dead or severely wounded, were 
dragged by them from the field. Our loss was but one 
killed and sixteen wounded ; among the latter, Lieut. Betts, 
adjutant of the command. " In this battle," says Lieut. 
Nauman, " it is evident Powell (Osceola) was either taken 
by surprise or outgeneralled, as he lost five men before a 

1836, he was promoted to Major of the First Regiment of Artillery, and ordered to 
Florida. Oct. 15, 1836, he was made " Lieutenant-Colonel by brevet, for distinguished 
services in the affair of Fort Drane " ; and, the same month, was appointed by Gov. 
Call, of Florida, Quartermaster-General, and Colonel of the regiment of Creeks at- 
tached to his army. In consequence of his arduous duties and the sickly climate, Col. 
Pierce's health became greatly impaired, and he was ordered North for duty. He was 
stationed at Plattsburg with his regiment, and subsequently at Houlton, and New 
York City. Subsequent to his return North in 1838, he was appointed Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Eighth Regiment of Infantry, and his appointment confirmed by the 
Senate ; but he declined the appointment, preferring the arm of service in which 
he had served so long. Change of climate, however, did not improve his health ; and 
he died of disease of the brain, at New York, in 1849, aged fifty-nine years. 



292 adjutant-general's eeport. 

rifle was fired on his side." Maj. Pierce, taking the dead 
and wounded with him, returned to Micanopy. This splen- 
did action gave courage to our troops in Florida, and was 
hailed with joy throughout the country. It proved that 
energy, skill, and bravery, as of old, would tell upon an 
enemy in Florida as elsewhere. Upon receiving a report 
of this fight, Gen. Call wrote Maj. Pierce the following 
complimentary letter : ■ — 

"Tallahasse, Sept. 6, 1836. 
" Sir, — -I have received through Col. Crane a copy of your offi- 
cial report of the battle of Fort Drane. Your conduct and that 
of the officers and men under your command, on that occasion, 
reflects on you and upon them the highest credit. To have beaten 
Powell (Osceola) with one third of his force was a proud achieve- 
ment; and I take this occasion to tender my acknowledgments to 
you and to your command for this gallant service. 
" I am, sir, very respectfully, 

" Your obedient servant, 

"E. K. CALL, 
" Commander-in-chief." 
"Maj. B. K. Pierce, United States Army." 

This action was made the occasion of a general order of 
congratulation at the head-quarters of the army at Wash- 
ington, couched in the following terms : — 

"Head-quarters of the Army, Adjt. -General's Office, 

Washington, Sept. 16, 1836. 
" General Order ~No. 61. 

"L The Major-General Commanding-in-chief has received the 
official account of the attack made on the 21st of August, by Maj. 
Pierce, of the First Eegiment of Artillery, on a large body of 
Indians collected on the site of old Fort Drane, in which, with a 
force of only 110 men, he completely surprised and routed about 
300 warriors, and killed and wounded a considerable number of 
them. 

"II. The conduct of officers and men engaged in this enterprise, 
like those who attacked a superior force at Micanopy under the 
gallant and much-lamented Lieut.-Col. Heileman, is deserving of 
the highest praise. 

III. " It is with much satisfaction that the Major-General recurs 
to the conduct on all occasions of the troops of the regular army 
who have been serving- in Florida against the Seminoles. Wher- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 293 

ever they have had an opportunity of meeting 1 the enemy, they 
have acted with a spirit of gallantry worthy of a nobler field ; and 
the Major-General cannot, without deep sensibility, contemplate 
the sacrifices and sufferings which they have experienced in the 
arduous duties imposed on them ; all which they have borne with 
a fortitude and submission to discipline which reflect honor on 
the character of the American army, and entitle them to the 
approbation and regard of their government and country. 
" Bv order of 

"MAJ.-GEN. MACOMB, 
11 Major- General Commanding-in-chief. 
11 S. Cooper, Acting Adjutant-General." 

On the 28th of September, Gen. Call commenced an expe- 
dition into the Indian country from the Suwanee River, with 
1,400 mounted men from Tennessee and Florida. He had 
appointed Maj. Pierce Quartermaster-General of his army, 
who had obtained supplies from Savannah and St. Augus- 
tine ; but three steamboats containing them were detained 
in the river St. John's by sickness of their crews. From 
these circumstances, when the army arrived at Fort Drane 
they were short of provisions and forage. The horses were 
without forage for seven days, and were turned out to pas- 
ture at the risk of being stolen by the Indians. The army 
continued encamped at Fort Drane until the evening of the 
6th of October, when Maj. Pierce arrived with provisions. 
He was at Black Creek on the night of the 4th of October, 
when an express arrived at ten o'clock, announcing that a 
force of Floridians were on their way to assist in escorting 
the provisions to Fort Drane. At midnight he started his 
command with his train of provisions from Black Creek, and 
on the evening of the next day (the 6th) arrived at Fort 
Drane, — a distance of sixty-five miles ! The commissariat 
thus replenished, Gen. Call started with his command for 
the Withlacoochee on Monday, the 8th of October, in pursuit 
of the Indians. With a view of surprising the Indians, 
a new route was taken ; and Maj. Pierce, at the head of a 
battalion of artillery of 200 men, took the advance, cut a 
road for fifty miles, and, though much fatigued, on the 
morning of the 12th of October surprised and routed a 



291 adjutant-general's report. 

large party of Indians; the men escaping to the hummocks, 
and leaving twelve of their women as prisoners. 

Finding no provisions upon the Withlacoochee, the army 
retraced its steps to Fort Drane and thence across the pen- 
insula to Black Creek, to wait for supplies. Meantime Col. 
Pierce, who had been appointed to the command of the 
Creek regiment in place of the late Col. Lane by Gov. 
Call, had been despatched for wagons and provisions to 
Charleston, and in the short space of ten days returned 
thence; having succeeded in obtaining a full supply of pro- 
visions, a wagon train, and a supply of horses. As soon as 
the supplies arrived and the horses of the Tennesseeans 
were recruited, the army took up its line of march for the 
strongholds of the enemy. 



THE BATTLES OP WAHOO SWAMP. 

On the 13th of November, the army arrived upon the 
Withlacoochee, and encamped in the Cove. The Indian 
towns were all abandoned and the houses burned. Find- 
ing no enemy, it was determined to follow up the river on 
both banks in pursuit of him. Gen. Call was to cross the 
river with the Tennessee and Florida troops with some reg- 
ulars ; while Col. Pierce, with the regular troops and his 
regiment of friendly Indians, was to follow up the south 
bank of the river. On the 16th of November, the two 
divisions took up their line of march. On the 17th, about 
four or five miles above the Cove, Gen. Call's division fell 
in with a body of the enemy, engaged and routed them 
with much slaughter. Twenty-one of the enemy were found 
dead, and they were seen to carry off many of their dead 
and wounded. The whites pursued the enemy up the river, 
and encamped for the night within a few miles of Dade's 
battle-ground, and made arrangements to feel for the enemy 
the next day in the Wahoo Swamp. 

On the morning of the 18th, Gen. Call marched at the 
head of five hundred Tennessee troops for the swamp. En- 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 295 

tering upon open ground, they saw an Indian town in flames, 
and the savages making for the swamp. Upon entering 
the swamp, the Indians halted, and waited to receive our 
troops. The force was ordered to advance, and, at a signal 
from an Indian, the enemy rose from the edge of the hum- 
mock and fired. Our troops immediately charged into the 
hummock, and the Indians were driven off. They made 
several attempts to outflank us, but failed. The whites 
lost in this conflict three killed and about twenty wounded. 
Their ammunition being nearly exhausted, our troops re- 
tired to their encampment. On the 20th, Col. Pierce 
formed a junction with Gen. Call, having met no enemy in 
force upon the south bank of the river. On the 21st of 
November, the combined forces marched for the Wahoo 
Swamp. The enemy met them at the edge of the swamp, and 
a severe conflict ensued, which lasted for four hours. Our 
troops charged into the swamp without firing a gun, and then 
fired upon the Indians at close shot. The fire was returned 
along the whole line. At length the Indians gave way and 
retreated, closely followed by our troops. The division 
under Col. Pierce and the one under Col. Truesdell were 
delayed for some time by the depth of mud and water ; while 
Col. Brown, not thus impeded, overtook and fought the 
enemy. They stood their ground stoutly. At length Col. 
Pierce with the regulars and friendly Indians, and Col. 
Truesdell with the Tennesseeans, coming up, engaged in 
the conflict, and the Indians abandoned their position and 
retreated. Our troops then retired to the open ground, and, 
caring for the dead and wounded, returned to their camp. 
Our loss was three killed and sixteen wounded. The loss 
of the enemy was very large. 

In this affair Gen. Call thus speaks in relation to the reg- 
ulars and militia under Col. Pierce : " Where all behave so 
well, it is difficult to discriminate. I cannot, however, for- 
bear to mention the names of Lieut.-Col. H. Brown, Maj. 
Morris, Capts. Ross, Maitland, Piercy, and Searle, and 
Lieut. Lee, of the artillery, who sustained the first unequal 
contest mth the enemy at the disputed passage. These 



296 

were followed and bravely sustained by Capt. Warren, Capt. 
Evans, and Lieut. Myrick, of the Florida militia ; and by 
Maj. Gardner, Capts. Tompkins and Porter of the artillery, 
and the officers and men under their command. Indeed, 
no higher praise can be paid to Col. Pierce and the regular 
troops under his command, both officers and men, than to 
say that all behaved with their characteristic valor, and 
those who were foremost in the action were precisely those 
whom circumstances and the nature of the ground favored 
in their advance/' - . 



THE BATTLE OF LAKE MONROE. 

On the 3d of February, 1837, Abraham,. Jumper, and 
Alligator, three noted Seminole chiefs, with two other chiefs 
of less note, — one a nephew of Micanopy, — came in and 
had " a talk" with Gen. Jessup. They professed to want 
peace, and agreed to meet at Fort Drane on the 18th inst., 
with other chiefs, for a farther talk as to peace. 

It is highly probable, however, that this was a mere ruse 
to gain an advantage, as, only five days after, a large force 
of Indians made an attack upon Col. Fanning's camp, upon 
Lake Monroe. 

The Indians, some three hundred strong, commenced the 
attack before daylight, on the morning of the 8th of Feb- 
ruary, by giving the dreaded war-whoop on all sides of the 
camp, and then discharging their rifles. The enemy's right 
rested on the lake above the camp, while his line extended 
round in front of the same, his left resting on the lake 
below. Our troops sprang to the breastworks with alacrity, 
and a sharp contest ensued. Being mostly recruits, in the 
excitement of a first engagement, they wasted their fire for 
a time. Soon, however, under the direction of their more 
practical officers, they made their fire tell. The steamer 
" Santee " was in the lake near by, and Second Lieut. 
Thomas was ordered on board her to serve a six-pounder, 
and direct its fire upon the enemy's right. This he did 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 297 

promptly and effectually, clearing that flank of the enemy 
in a short time. 

Meantime, the fire from our breastworks became more 
effectual as the recruits became cool and collected ; and, 
after three hours of sharp firing, the enemy were hand- 
somely repulsed, taking off, however, their killed and 
wounded. Our loss was one (the brave Capt. Mellon) 
killed, and fifteen wounded. In his report of the battle of 
Lake Monroe, Col. Fanning, in speaking of the United 
States Dragoons, under Col. Harney, says : " With the 
officers of his battalion I have every reason to be well 
satisfied. My eye was upon every one, and I discovered 
nothing but firmness and confidence in all." Among the 
officers specified, and thus highly complimented, was Sec- 
ond Lieut. John W. S. McNeil, of the Second Regiment of 
United States Dragoons.* 



THE CAPTURE OF PHILIP AND UCHEE BILLY. 

About the 1st of September, an expedition was planned 
by Gen. Hernandez against some camps of Indians reported 
to be pitched at the south of Fort Peyton some forty or 
fifty miles. Accordingly, on Thursday, the 7th of Septem- 
ber, a detachment of troops started out to break up their 
camps. The force, about one hundred and seventy men, — 

* Lieut. John W. S. McNeil was the son of Gen. John McNeil of Hillsborough, and 
was born on the Island of Mackinaw, Feb. 17, 1817. He was educated at West Point, 
and commenced the study of law at Hillsborough, in the office of his uncle, Hon. 
Franklin Pierce. June 8, 1836, he was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Second 
Regiment United States Dragoons. He was stationed at Corbondale, Penn., on recruit- 
ing service, through the summer, but was ordered in the winter to join his regiment in 
Florida. He was in several skirmishes during the summer of 1837, in command of his 
company. He died, Sept. 11, 1837, from the effects of a wound received the preceding 
day in a skirmish with a party of Indian^ under the noted Seminole chief, TJchee Billy. 
As McNeil advanced at the head of his division to charge the Indians, Uchee Billy 
levelled his rifle at him, and was discovered by McNeil, who quickly drew his pistol to 
fire at him; but the Indian had the advantage of time, and his bullet passed through 
McNeil's right hand and took effect in the abdomen. He remained upon the field 
during the battle, and was then removed to the camp upon a litter. The next day the 
command started for St. Augustine; bat McNeil died upon the way, at 10 o'clock on 
Monday night. His body was taken to St. Augustine, and buried with the honors of 
war ; after which, at a meeting of the officers of the post, resolutions were passed highly 
complimentary to his character as a soldier and a man. 



298 adjutant-general's report. 

comprising parts of Company F, Second Dragoons, under 
Lieut. McNeil ; B and H, Second Dragoons, under Lieut. 
May ; part of Capt. Hanson's company, under Lieuts. Pelli- 
cer and Ferreria; Lieut. Whitehurts's company of volunteer 
Florida horse ; and Company D, Third Artillery, under Lieut. 
Frazer, — was under the immediate command of Lieut. Pey- 
ton, of the Second Regiment of Dragoons. Gen. Hernan- 
dez accompanied the detachment, and had the control 
of the expedition. On reaching Bulowville, the battalion 
encamped for the night ; the baggage train, under Lieut. 
Frazer, occupying St. Joseph's. Whilst making preparations 
for the march the following morning, five runaway negroes 
came in, and, delivering themselves up, claimed protection 
against the Indians, who, they reported, had no intention 
of emigrating, and that parties of them were then prepar- 
ing coo?iti* south of the Tomoka, and east of the St. John's 
River. A negro, belonging to the Indian chief, Philip, 
acting as guide, the battalion marched from Bulowville on 
Friday morning, and crossed the Tomoka near its head. 
Continuing the march through the day, in the evening they 
saw the fires of the enemy's camp at Dunlawton. The 
force proceeded cautiously, and about midnight the volun- 
teers under Lieut. Whitehurst formed an ambuscade on 
two sides of the camp. At daylight, the dragoons, under 
Lieut. Peyton, advanced to the attack. Lieut. May's com- 
pany charged, and captured the chief, Philip, with another 
Indian, and a number of women and children ; one only, 
the youngest son of Philip, escaping. This capture was 
made without loss of blood to either party. 

The Indian taken with Philip was known as " Tomoka 
John." He offered to guide them to the camp of Lxhee 
Billy, some ten miles away, and his offer was accepted. 
The battalion started forthwith, and, after much fatigue, 
taking a circuitous route, they came up with their fires 
early in the evening, and halted, while midnight, within 

* A contraction of cocuntie, an edible root growing in Florida, that, when dried and 
cured, is much relished by the Indians. It is found in quantity, and dug and cured 
by the Indian women. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 299 

about a mile of their camp. Soon after midnight, they 
carefully advanced, and completely surrounded them. The 
Indians were aroused by the barking of their dogs, and 
put out their fires, fearing danger at hand. At the dawn 
of day, on Sunday, the 10th, a charge was ordered by the 
whole force, in two divisions, one led by Lieut. Peyton, and 
the other by Lieut. McNeil. The Indians were waiting the 
attack, and made one discharge of their rifles, by which 
Lieut. McNeil was mortally wounded. He was the only 
man injured of our party ; but, of the Indians, two were 
killed and three wounded. 

The whole party, consisting of Uchee Billy, his brother 
Jack, three warriors of less note, and a number of women 
and children, were taken, — not an Indian escaping, save 
one, who got through our line in the night, but not in sea- 
son to give the alarm to the Indians in the neighborhood. 

This was a successful and important expedition, as Uchee 
Billy was one of the leading spirits among the Seminole 
warriors. On the 12th of September, the battalion marched 
into St. Augustine with thirty-five captive Indians, all told, 
amid the congratulations of the people. The St. Augustine 
"Herald," of date Sept. 13, adds: "The gallant Lieut. 
McNeil lingered until ten o'clock on Monday night, when 
he expired. He was a promising young officer, and his loss 
is universally regretted. His body was brought in, and 
buried with military honors, at six o'clock yesterday after- 



300 adjutant-general's report. 



THE MILITIA LAW OF THE REVISED STATUTES. 

In June, 1840, the Legislature authorized the revision of 
the statutes of the State, by resolving " that three suitable 
persons be appointed by His Excellency, with advice of 
Council, to revise, codify, and amend the statute laws of 
New-Hampshire." Under this resolve, Hon. Joel Parker,* 
Samuel D. Bell, Esq., and Charles J. Fox, Esq.,| were 
appointed the commissioners of revision in November fol- 
lowing. A draft of the Revised Statutes was presented, 
with the report of the commissioners, to the Legislature 
on the first day of its session in 1842, and at the adjourned 
session of the Legislature, commencing on the first Wednes- 

* Hon. Joel Parker was born at Jaffrey, Jan. 25, 1795. He graduated at Dartmouth 
College in the class of 1811. He read law at Amherst, in the office of his brother, 
Judge Edmund Parker, and commenced the practice of bis profession at Keene, in 
the fall of 1815. He represented the town of Keene in the Legislature in 1824, "25, and 
'26. Jan. 8,, 1833, he was appointed an Associate Justice of the Superior Court of 
New-Hampshire by Gov. Samuel Dinsmore; and Chief Justice of the same, June 25, 
1838, by Gov. Isaac Hill. In 1840, he was a commissioner, as above, to revise the laws 
of New-Hampshire. In 1847, Judge Parker was appointed the Professor of Medical 
Jurisprudence of Dartmouth College, and officiated in that capacity for ten years. In 
the same year, he was appointed Royall Professor of Law at Harvard College, which 
office he resigned the past year. Judge Parker has been a close student through life, 
and has found time, aside from his judicial duties, always learnedly performed, to 
favor the public with the results of his studies through the periodical press, and in 
occasional publications ; while his Law Reports are monuments of his industry and 
his legal lore. Learned in his profession, genial in his manners, and dignified in his 
deportment, Judge Parker was an ornament to the bench of New-Hampshire, as well 
as to the professor's chair in Harvard University. 

t Charles James Fox was of Nashua, but was born in Hancock, Oct. 11, 1812. He 
graduated at Dartmouth College, in the class of 1831. He read his course of legal 
studies in the office of Hon. Titus Brown, of Francestown, at the Law School at New 
Haven, Ct., and with Hon. Daniel Abbott, of Nashua. Upon the completion of his 
legal studies, he entered the bar of Hillsborough County in 1834, and commenced the 
practice of the law as a partner of his last instructor in that science, the Hon. Daniel 
Abbott, at Nashua. He represented his adopted town in the Legislature in 1837; was 
appointed Solicitor for Hillsborough County in 1837 ; and was appointed one of the 
commissioners ta revise the statutes of New-Hampshire, as above, in 1841. His arduous 
labors upon this commission broke a slender constitution ; and, to seek relief from the 
insidious disease, the scourge of our New-England climate, consumption, he made a 
voyage up the Mediterranean in 1843, and in 1844 visited the West Indies for the like 
purpose, but with no avail: he continued to decline, and died at Nashua, Feb. 17, 1846, 
aged thirty-four years. 

Mr. Fox was a ripe scholar. He wrote good prose, fine poetry, and was learned in 
the law. He compiled, with Rev. Samuel Osgood, "The New-Hampshire Book"; 
wrote " The History of the Old Town of Dunstable," and the " Town Officer," besides 
articles for the periodical press, and a series of letters during his visits to Africa and 
the West Indies. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 301 

day of November following. After a protracted session of 
fifty-two days, on the 23d of December, 1842, the Revised 
Statutes of New-Hampshire were adopted. 

Col. Bell had been of the commission of 1829, and had 
prepared the militia law incorporated in the volume of stat- 
utes published by the State in 1830. Such being the case, 
and those laws being prepared with great care, no great 
alterations were deemed necessary ; and such only were 
made as to condense and simplify existing statutes, meet 
supposed or real defects, and changes of circumstances. 

By the Revised Statutes, there were placed among the 
conditional exempts the members of the Council, persons 
having conscientious scruples of bearing arms, and persons 
between the ages of forty and forty-five ; and the latter class 
were not required to do military duty, except in cases of 
invasion and insurrection, instead of having their arms and 
equipments, and carrying or sending them to the captains 
of their companies for inspection, on the first Tuesday of 
May in each year, as required by the law of 1830. They 
provided that residence in town, for the purpose of obtain- 
ing an education at any literary institution, should not sub- 
ject the person so residing to do military duty in that town ; 
that every soldier, doing his duty according to law, should 
receive in the month of October annually, from the select- 
men of the town in which he resided, one dollar; that each 
soldier, whether officer, non-commissioned officer, private, or 
musician, should receive from the selectmen of the town in 
which he resided fifty cents on each muster-day, to be paid 
on the parade-ground ; that every company should regularly 
consist of sixty-four ; that the captains of the several artil- 
lery companies should build gun-houses when needed, at a 
cost of not over fifty dollars, and should be responsible for 
guns, harnesses, and other apparatus attached thereto ; that 
every company required to be armed with muskets or rifles, 
and having thirty-two rank and file, should receive from the 
State arsenals muskets or rifles enough to arm said com- 
pany, not exceeding sixty-four ; that every company of artil- 
lery having sixty-four rank and file, enlisted and uniformed, 



302 

should receive thirty-two muskets, the muskets or rifles to 
be delivered alone upon the certificate of the Adjutant- 
General, and upon the furnishing proper bonds ; that, in 
cases of actual or threatened invasion, insurrection, or 
other public danger, the Commander-in-chief might order 
detachments to be made, and that commanders of divisions, 
brigades, and regiments might do the same, and appoint 
military watches or guards upon emergencies, until orders 
could be received from the Commander-in-chief, and that all 
such detachments for actual service should be subject to the 
rules and articles provided by the laws of the United States 
for the government of the militia in the service of the 
United States ; specifying more particularly the duties of 
the Adjutant-General, and ordering him to give bonds for 
the faithful discharge of his duties in a sum of not less 
than two thousand dollars, nor more than ten thousand 
dollars ; and authorizing any company of cavalry, artillery, 
grenadiers, light infantry, or riflemen duly organized accord- 
ing to law, under certain specified conditions, to become a 
body politic and corporate. 

The limits of the several regiments, brigades, and divis- 
ions were thus constituted : — 

Section 1. The companies in Portsmouth, Newcastle, 
Rye, Greenland, Newington, and Stratham to constitute 
the First Regiment ; 

Sect. 2. Those in Dover and Somersworth, the Second ; 

Sect. 3. Those in Hampton, North-Hampton, Hampton 
Falls, Seabrook, South-Hampton, and Kensington, the 
Third ; 

Sect. 4. Those in Exeter, Newmarket, Brentwood, Pop- 
lin, and Epping, the Fourth ; 

Sect. 5. Those in Amherst, Merrimack, Litchfield, Mont 
Vernon, Milford, Nashua, Hollis, Hudson, and Brookline, 
the Fifth ; 

Sect. 6. Those in Richmond, Winchester, Swanzey, 
Chesterfield, and Hinsdale, the Sixth ; 

Sect. 7. Those in Kingston, East Kingston, Danville, 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 303 

Newtown, Atkinson, Plaistow, Hampstead, and Sandown, 
the Seventh ; 

Sect. 8. Those inDerry, Londonderry, Salem, Windham, 
and Pelham, the Eighth ; 

Sect. 9. Those in Manchester, GofTstown, Dunbarton, 
Bedford, New-Boston, and Weare, the Ninth ; 

Sect. 10. Those in Gilmanton, Gilford, and Barnstead, 
the Tenth ; 

Sect. 11. Those in Concord, Bow, Pembroke, Aliens- 
town, and Hooksett, the Eleventh ; 

Sect. 12. Those in Rindge, Jaffrey, Eitzwilliam, Boxbury, 
Dublin, Marlborough, Nelson, and Troy, the Twelfth ; 

Sect. 13. Those in Haverhill, Piermont, Orford, Warren, 
and Benton, the Thirteenth ; 

Sect. 14. Those in Plymouth, Holderness, Campton, 
Thornton, Ellsworth, Woodstock, Waterville, and Lincoln 
on the east side of the mountain, the Fourteenth ; 

Sect. 15. Those of Plainfield, Cornish, Claremont, and the 
west company in Grantham, the Fifteenth ; 

Sect. 16. Those in Charlestown, Langdon, Acworth, and 
Unity, the Sixteenth ; 

Sect. 17. Those in Chester, Candia, and Raymond, the 
Seventeenth ; 

Sect. 18. Those in Nottingham, Deerfield, Epsom, North- 
wood, and Pittsfield, the Eighteenth ; 

Sect. 19. Those in Moultonborough, Centre Harbor, 
Sandwich, and Tamworth, the Nineteenth ; 

Sect. 20. Those in Walpole, Westmoreland, Keene, 
Surry, Gilsum, and Sullivan, the Twentieth ; 

Sect. 21. Those in Boscawen, Salisbury, Andover, and 
Franklin, the Twenty-first ; 

Sect. 22. Those in New-Ipswich, Sharon, Mason, Peter- 
borough, Temple, Lyndeborough, and Wilton, the Twenty- 
second ; 

Sect. 23. Those in Hanover, Lebanon, and Lyme, the 
Twenty-third ; 

Sect. 24. Those in Stratford, Columbia, Colebrook, 
Stewartstown, Errol, Clarksville, and Pittsburg, the Twemy- 
fourth ; 



304 adjutant-general's report. 

Sect. 25. Those in Durham, Lee, Madbury, Strafford, 
and Barrington, the Twenty-fifth ; 

Sect. 26. Those in Antrim, Deering, Hillsborough, Wind- 
sor, Hancock, Francestown, Greenfield, and Bennington, 
the Twenty-sixth ; 

Sect. 27. Those in Wolfborough, Tuftonborough, Ossi- 
pee, Effingham, Freedom, and the north company in Wake- 
field, the Twenty-seventh ; 

Sect. 28. Those in Alstead, Marlow, Lempster, Stoddard, 
and Washington, the Twenty-eighth ; 

Sect. 29. Those in Sanbornton, New-Hampton, and 
Meredith, the Twenty-ninth ; 

Sect. 30. Those in New-London, Newbury, Wilmot, Brad- 
ford, and Sutton, the Thirtieth ; 

Sect. 31. Those in Newport, Wendell, Goshen, Croyden, 
Springfield, and the east company in Grantham, the Thirty- 
first ; 

Sect. 32. Those in Bath, Lyman, Landaff, Lisbon, Little- 
ton, Bethlehem, Franconia, and Lincoln on the west side 
of the mountain, the Thirty-second ; 

Sect. 33. Those in New-Durham, Alton, Middleton, 
Brookfield, and the southerly company in Wakefield, and 
the north company in Milton, the Thirty-third ; 

Sect. 34. Those in Hill, Bridgewater, Bristol, Alexandria, 
Hebron, and Danbury, the Thirty-fourth ; 

Sect. 35. Those in Wentworth, Rumney, Dcrchester, 
and Groton, the Thirty-fifth ; 

Sect. 36. Those in Eaton, Albany, Conway, Bartlett, 
Jackson, and Chatham, the Thirty-sixth ; 

Sect. 37. Those in Canaan, Dame's Gore, Orange, En- 
field, and Grafton, the Thirty-seventh ; 

Sect. 38. Those in Chichester, Canterbury, Loudon, and 
Northfield, the Thirty-eighth ; 

Sect. 39. Those in Rochester, Farmington, and Milton, 
except the north company, the Thirty-ninth ; 

Sect. 40. Those in Hopkinton, Henniker, and Warner, 
the Fortieth ; 

Sect. 41.. Those in Shelburne, Gorham, Berlin, Milan, 
Randolph, and Pinkham's Grant, the Forty-first ; 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 305 

Sect. 42. Those in Lancaster, Northumberland, Dalton, 
Whitefield, Stark, Jefferson, Carroll, and Nash and Saw- 
yer's Location, the Forty-second Regiment. 

Sect. 43. The First, Third, Fourth, and Seventh Regi- 
ments composed the First Brigade ; 

Sect. 44. The Second, Tenth, Twenty-fifth, Twenty- 
ninth, and Thirty-ninth Regiments composed the Second 
Brigade ; 

Sect. 45. The Eighth, Eleventh, Seventeenth, Eigh- 
teenth, and Thirty-eighth Regiments composed the Third 
Brigade ; 

Sect. 46. The Fifth, Ninth, Twenty-first, Twenty-second, 
Twenty-sixth, Thirtieth, and Fortieth Regiments composed 
the Fourth Brigade ; 

Sect. 47. The Sixth, Twelfth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, 
Twentieth, Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-first Regiments com- 
posed the Fifth Brigade ; 

Sect. 48. The Fourteenth, Twenty-third, Thirty-fourth, 
Thirty-fifth, and Thirty-seventh Regiments composed the 
Sixth Brigade ; 

Sect. 49. The Nineteenth, Twenty-seventh, Thirty-third, 
and Thirty-sixth Regiments composed the Seventh Brigade ; 

Sect. 50. The Thirteenth, Twenty-fourth, Thirty-second, 
Forty-first, and Forty-Second Regiments composed the 
Eighth Brigade. 

Sect. 51. The First and Third Brigades constituted the 
First Division ; 

Sect. 52. The Second and Seventh Brigades constituted 
the Second Division ; 

Sect. 53. The Fourth and Fifth Brigades constituted the 
Third Division ; 

Sect. 54. The Sixth and Eighth Brigades constituted 
the Fourth Division. 

Thus it will be seen that one regiment (the Thirty-fifth) 
had been merged in another, and three new ones had been 
formed since 1830. The Thirty-fifth, comprising the com- 
panies in Newcastle, Rye, Greenland, Newington, and Strat- 
20 



306 

ham, had been united with the First ; and a new regiment, 
to take its number, had been formed, from the companies in 
Wentworth, of the Thirteenth, Groton of the Thirty-fourth, 
and Dorchester of the Thirty-seventh. Two additional 
regiments had been formed, the Forty-first and Forty-sec- 
ond, — the Forty-first from companies in Shelburne, Gorham, 
Berlin, Milan, Pinkham's Grant, and from Randolph of the 
Twenty-fourth Regiment ; and the Forty-second from the 
companies in Lancaster, Jefferson, Dalton, Northumberland, 
Whitefield, Stark (then Piercy), Carroll (then Bretton 
Woods), and Nash and Sawyer's Location, of the Twenty- 
Fourth Regiment ; leaving Stratford, Columbia, Colebrook, 
and Stewartstown to the Twenty-Fourth, and adding 
thereto the new towns of Errol, Clarksburg, and Pittsburg 
to make up its loss. 

The organization of the militia of the State in 1843, 
under the Revised Statutes, was as follows : — 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 307 

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. 

His Excellency Henry Hubbard, Charlestown. 

aides-de-camp (with the rank of Colonel) . 
Edmund Burke,* Newport. 
Henry D. Pierce, f Hillsborough. 
Greenleaf Clarke, f Atkinson. 
Harry Hibbard, § Bath. 
Tileston A. Barker, || Westmoreland. 
Joseph Badger, ^[ Gilmanton. 

* Col. Edmund Burke is of Newport, and was born in Westminister, Vt., Jan. 23, 
1809. He commenced the practice of law at Newport in 1835. In 1837 he was appointed 
Adjutant of the Thirty-first Regiment, and, Aug. 9, 1838, was appointed Brigade- 
Inspector of the Fifth Brigade. In 1810 he was appointed Solicitor for the County of 
Sullivan. In June, 1842, he was appointed upon Gov. Hubbard's staff, with rank 
of Colonel, as above. In 1839 he was elected a Representative to Congress, and was 
re-elected in 1841 for a second term, and for a third term in 1843. Upon the accession 
of Mr. Polk to the Presidential chair in 1845, Mr. Burke was appointed Commissioner 
of Patents. Mr. Burke is a sound lawyer and an able writer. He still resides at 
Newport, but has a law-office in Boston. 

f Col. Henry Dearborn Pierce is a son of Ex-Gov. Benjamin Pierce, and was born 
at Hillsborough, Sept. 19, 1812. 

He was appointed Lieutenant of the company of cavalry in the Twenty-sixth Regi- 
ment, Jan. 27, 1836; Captain of same, Dec. 8, 1838; and upon Gov. Hubbard's staff in 
1842, as above. Col. Pierce represented the town of Hillsborough in the Legislature in 
1841 and '42, and, for nineteen years prior to March, 1868, was annually elected Moder- 
ator of the town. 

X Col. Greenleaf Clarke was born in Atkinson, May 7, 1816, and is a farmer. He rep- 
resented his native town in the Legislature in 1842 and '43; was a member of the 
Council for the Rockingham District in 1849 and '50; appointed Justice of the Peace 
and of the Quorum throughout the State in 1850 ; Commissioner for the Boston and 
Maine Railroad in 1846, and held the office ten years ; in 1842 was appointed as above 
by Gov. Hubbard upon his staff, with rank of Colonel. Col. Clarke is a man of enter- 
prise and much business capacity. 

§ Col. Harry Hibbard is of Bath, and a lawyer. He was born in Concord, Vt., June 
1, 181.6. He graduated at Dartmouth College in the class of 1835, and commenced the 
practice of his profession at Bath in 1839. He was elected Assistant Clerk of the House 
of Representatives the same year ; Clerk in 1840, '41, and '42; represented the town of 
Bath in the Legislature in 1843, '44, and '45, and was Speaker of the House the two lat- 
ter years; Senator from Senatorial District No. 12 in 1846, '47, and '48, and President 
of that body the two latter years. He was elected a Representative to Congress for a 
term of two years in 1851, and was re-elected for a second term in 1853, and again for 
a third term in 1855. Col. Hibbard is a sound lawyer, and has an extensive practice. 

|| Col. Tileston A. Barker was born in Westmoreland, April 18, 1807, and is a 
farmer. He was appointed Captain of the First Company of Light Infantry in the 
Twentieth Regiment, Sept. 21, 1829, and Colonel of the same regiment, June 25, 1833, 
but declined; appointed Brigade Quartermaster of the Fifth Brigade, Aug. 31, 1835. 
He represented the town of Westmoreland in the Legislature in 1842 and '43. He was 
appointed Captain of Company " A " in the Second New-Hampshire Regiment of Vol- 
unteers, in June, 1861; Lieutenant-Colonel of the Fourteenth New-Hampshire Regi- 
ment of Volunteers, in September, 1862 ; and was brevetted Colonel, Sept. 13, 1866. 

TT Col. Joseph Badger is of Gilmanton, a son of Ex-Gov. William Badger, and was 
born June 27, 1817. He was appointed by Gov. Hubbard upon his staff in 1842, 
as above. He is a farmer and lives upon " the old homestead," leading a retired, quiet 
life, much respected in the community. 



308 adjutant-general's report. 

adjutant and quartermaster general. 

Charles H. Peaslee, Concord (having the rank of Brig 
adier-General). 

Commissary-General (chosen annually by the Legisla- 
ture), William Rhymes, Portsmouth. 

INSPECTOR OF ORDNANCE AND MILITARY STORES. 

Josiah Stevens, jr.,* Concord. 

DIVISION AND DIVISIONARY STAFF-OFFICERS — FIRST DIVISION 

David Pillsbury, f Major-General, Chester. 
Josiah C. Eastman, J Division-Inspector. 
Lucius R. Henderson, Division Quartermaster. 

AIDES-DE-CAMP. 

James H. Butler, § Joseph Montgomery. 



* July 3, 1821, the Legislature passed a resolution authorizing the Governor, wit 
advice of Council, to appoint an Inspector of Ordnance, &c, and Col. Stevens wa 
appointed and duly commissioned the 11th day of November following. The Revise 
Statutes of 1842 recognized no such military officer. 

t Gen. David Pillsbury was a native of Raymond, where he was born Feb. I 
1802. He graduated at Dartmouth College in the class of 1827, read law with Hoi 
Henry Hubbard of Charlestown, and Hon. S. D. Bell of Chester, and commenced th 
practice of his profession at Chester in 1830, upon the removal of Mr. Bell to Exete: 
He was appointed Adjutant of the Seventeeth Regiment, Aug. 11, 1830 ; promote 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the same, June 24, 1831 ; promoted Colonel, June 21, 1832 ; Brig? 
dier-General of the Third Brigade, June, 1838; and Major-General of the First Divii 
ion, June 19, 1840. He was a Representative from Chester in 1842 and '44. B 
removed to Concord in 1854, and was appointed Special Justice of that city, June 3 
1857, and Police Justice, Sept. 28, 1857. He died, unmarried, May 25, 1862, age 
sixty years. 

t Col. Josiah C. Eastman is of Hampstead, a physician, and a graduate of the Med 
cal School of Dartmouth College. He was chosen a Representative to the Legislatur 
from the town of Hampstead in 1847, '48, '49, and '50. In 1840, Aug. 31, he w<- 
appointed by Gen. Pillsbury upon bis staff as Division-Inspector. He was chose 
Senator from Senatorial District No. 2 in 1853 and '54. In 1861, Aug. 20, he w; 
commissioned Surgeon of the Fourth Regiment of New-Hampshire Volunteer L 
fantry, and followed the fortunes of his regiment until Oct. 7, 1862, when he resigne 
Dr. Eastman is reputed to be a skilful physician, and has an extensive practice. 

§ Maj. James H. Butler is of Nottingham, where he was born, Oct. 27, 1811. I 
was Representative from Nottingham in the Legislature of 1842 and '43; Aide 
Maj. -Gen. Pillsbury, of the First Division, in 1842, as above; and Aide on Maj.-Gei 
John Gale's staff, in same division, in 1844. He was appointed Associate Justice > 
the Court of Common Pleas for Rockingham County in 1852. Judge Butler is a farme 
and a man of extensive business connections. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 309 

SECOND DIVISION. 

Daniel Moulton, Gilmanton, Major-General. 
Elbridge G. Guilford,* Division-Inspector. 
Robert S. Webster, Division Quartermaster. 

AIDES-DE-CAMP. 

George W. Sanborn, George Y. Pickering. 

THIRD DIVISION. 

Israel Hunt, jr., f Major-General. 
Henry Hubbard, jr., J Division-Inspector. 
George W. Morrison, § Division Quartermaster. 

AIDES-DE-CAMP. 

Dustin S. Bowers, John L. Pollard. 



* Col. E. G. Guilford was born at Gilford Dec. 13, 1816. He was appointed Captain of 
the Eighth Company of Infantry in the Tenth Regiment, March 10, 1840 ; Inspector of 
the Second Division on Maj.-Gen. Moulton's staff, July 18, 1842. Shortly after, he 
moved to Manchester, and, July 16, 1849, was appointed Adjutant of the Ninth Regi- 
ment; Major of the same, July 4, 1851; and Lieutenant-Colonel, Dec. 13, 1851. Col. 
Guilford is now a well-known physician and farmer in Woodstock. 

f Gen. Israel Hunt, jr., is of Nashua, and was born Feb. 25, 1795. He was appointed 
Ensign of the " Nashua Guards," attached to the Fifth Regiment, Aug. 6, 1822; Lieu- 
tenant, Dec. 18, 1822 ; and Captain, Jan. 14, 1824. He was appointed Major of the Fifth 
Regiment, Nov. 21, 1829; Lieutenant-Colonel, June 21, 1832; and Colonel, June 16, 1836. 
He was appointed Brigadier-General of the Fourth Brigade, June 27, 1839; and 
Major-General of the Third Division, July 25, 1841. 

He represented the town in the Legislature of 1828 ; was Senator from District No. 3 
in 1834, '35, and '36 ; and Councillor from the Hillsborough District in 1838 and '39. He 
was appointed Justice of the Police Court of Nashua, Oct. 27, 1853. Gen. Hunt is, at 
the present writing (April 15, 1868), active, hale, and hearty, at the age of seventy- 
three years, as many men at fifty. 

X Col. Henry Hubbard, jr., is a son of Ex-Gov. Hubbard, and a lawyer by profession, 
practising in Boston. 

§ Col. George W. Morrison is of Manchester. He was born in Fairlee, Vt., Oct. 9, 
1809; read law with Judge S. Short and Presbury "West, jr., of Thetford, Vt., and 
entered the bar of Hillsborough County, February term, 1838, and settled in the practice 
of the law at " Amoskeag Village," in Goffstown (now in Manchester). In 1839 he 
moved to Manchester. In 1840, Oct. 6, he was appointed Lieutenant in the " Stark 
Guards," of the Ninth Regiment, and Captain of that company May 5, 1842. The same 
year he was appointed upon Maj.-Gen. Hunt's staff as Quartermaster of the Third 
Division. He was a Representative from Manchester in 1840, '41, '44, '49, and '50. He 
was appointed Solicitor of the County of Hillsborough in 1845, and resigned in 1847. 
He was elected a Representative in Congress in 1851, to fill the unexpired term of Gftn. 
Wilson, who had resigned, and was re-elected in 1853. Col. Morrison is an able advo- 
cate, and is in the enjoyment of an extensive and lucrative practice. 






310 adjutant-general's report. 

brigade and staff officers — first brigade. 

John Gale,* Brigadier-General. 
James L. Bufford, Aide-de-camp. 
Moses Eaton, jr., f Brigade-Inspector. 
E. S. Sanborn, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Chandler E. Potter, Judge- Advocate. 

THIRD BRIGADE. 

Henry Tucker, Brigadier-General. 
Lewis Dowing, jr., Aide-de-camp. 
William Walker, jr., Brigade-Inspector. 
Joseph Blake, jr., Brigade Quartermaster. 
Asa Fowler, $ Judge-Advocate. 



* Gen. John Gale was of South Hampton, and was born in Amesbury, Mass., Sept. 
18, 1801. He was appointed Captain of the Sixth Company of Infantry in the Third 
Regiment, Aug. 25,1828; promoted Major of the Third Regiment, June 25, 1833; 
Lieutenant-Colonel, July 1, 1834; and Colonel, June 27, 1835. He was appointed Brig- 
adier-General of the First Brigade, June 27,1839; and Major-General of the First 
Division, June 20, 1844. He was Representative from South-Hampton in 1848. Gen. 
Gale carried on the business of blacksmithing and carriage-making while in South- 
Hampton. A few years since he removed to Lawrence, Mass., where he has an exten- 
sive carriage-manufactory. Gen. Gale is a man of energy and enterprise. 

t Col. Moses Eaton, jr., was of South-Hampton, and was born in Candia, Sept. 7, 
1804. He was appointed Adjutant of the Third Regiment, Aug. 28, 1828. Aug. 15, 
1831, he was appointed by Brig. -Gen. John Locke, of the First Brigade, Quartermaster 
upon his staff. In August, 1835, Maj. Eaton was appointed Brigade-Inspector by Gen. 
Locke. Upon Gen. Locke's promotion as Major-General of the First Division, Maj. 
Eaton was appointed by him Division-Inspector in September, 1836. In 1839, Col. 
John Gale, his fellow-townsman, having been appointed Brigadier-General of the First 
Brigade, Col. Eaton accepted the position upon his staff as Inspector, and was con- 
tinued as such upon Gen. Gale's promotion as Major-General of the First Division; 
Col. Eaton's second commission as Division-Inspector bearing date Aug. 19, 1844. Thus 
it will be seen that Col. Eaton had an extensive experience in the militia, and it hardly 
need be added that he was a prompt and efficient officer. Aside from military offices, 
Col. Eaton held important offices in civil life, in town and county. He was for a long 
time Deputy Sheriff, and in 1852 was Councillor for the Rockingham or First Councillor 
District. He died May 11, 1867, in the sixty-third year of his age. 

t Maj. Asa Fowler was of Concord. He was born in Pembroke, Feb. 23, 1811, and 
graduated at Dartmouth College in the class of 1833. He read law with Gen. Charles 
H. Peaslee, of Concord, and entered the Merrimack County bar in 1837, and com- 
menced the practice of his profession at Concord the same year. The following year 
he entered into a partnership with Gen. Franklin Pierce, which continued until 1845. 
He was Clerk of the Senate of New-Hampshire in 1835, '36, '37, '38, '39, and '40 ; and 
represented his adopted town in the Legislature in 1845, '47, and '48. In 1855 he was 
appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, and resigned in 1861. 

Judge Fowler is a gentleman of retiring habits and literary tastes, a sound lawyer, 
and made an excellent judge. His resignation of that office was a source of regret to 
all who desire an enlightened, independent administration of justice. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 311 

SECOND BRIGADE. 

Benjamin S. Tuttle, Brigadier-General. 
Daniel G. Smith, Aide-de-camp. 
Ebenezer Stevens, Brigade-Inspector. 
Charles P. Towle, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Jeremiah Elkins,* Judge-Advocate. 

SIXTH BRIGADE. 

George W. Durgin, Brigadier-General. 
James H. Eames, Aide-de-camp. 
D. R. Jackman, Brigade-Inspector. 
Woodman Willey, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Calvin Ainsworth, Judge-Advocate. 

FOURTH BRIGADE. 

Samuel Andrews,! Brigadier-General. 

Hale Sargent, Aide-de-camp. 

Benjamin Tuttle, Jr., | Brigade-Inspector. 

Benjamin P. McNeil, § Brigade Quartermaster. 

Samuel H. Ayer, || Judge-Advocate. 

* Jeremiah Elkins was a native of Andover, and was born Aug. 31, 1795. He prac- 
tised law at the city of Washington for some years. In 1835, he returned to this State, 
and established himself in the practice of the law at Gilford. In 1836, he removed to 
Barnstead, and was elected Clerk of the House of Representatives, and was re-elected 
in 1837 and 1838. In 1837, March 4, he was appointed Captain of the " Jackson Guards " 
in the Tenth Regiment. In 1838, he was appointed Judge-Advocate of the Second 
Brigade, and held that office until 1845. He was appointed Register of Probate for 
the County of Belknap, upon the formation of that County in 1841, and served in that 
office until 1851. He removed to Meredith in 1846, where he resided until his death, 
which took place in February, 1855, in the sixtieth year of his age. 

t Gen. Samuel Andrews was born at Hillsborough, Oct. 9, 1813. He was appointed 
Ensign of the First Company of Infantry in the Twenty-sixth Regiment, Jan. 23, 1836; 
Lieutenant, Jan. 11, 1837 ; and Captain, March 2, 1838. He was promoted to Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Twenty-sixth Regiment, June 27, 1839; and Colonel, July 2, 1840. He 
was appointed Brigadier-General of the Fourth Brigade, July 18, 1842; and Major- 
General, June 30, 1845. Gen. Andrews is a stirring, enterprising man. 

t Maj. Benjamin Tuttle is of Hillsborough, where he was born, April 27, 1811. He 
was for many years Deputy Sheriff for Hillsborough and adjacent counties; and Brig- 
ade-Inspector on Gen. Andrews's staff, as above, in 1842 and '43. He represented the 
town of Hillsborough in the Legislature in 1856 and '57. He has been engaged mainly 
in mercantile pursuits. 

§ Maj. Benjamin Pierce McNeil was a son of Gen. John McNeil of the United States 
Army, and was born at Hillsborough, Jan. 20, 1825. He was appointed as Brigade 
Quartermaster upon Gen. Andrews's staff, Aug. 11, 1842; Major of the Twenty-sixth 
Regiment, Dec. 15, 1843 ; and Division-Inspector of Third Division, Aug. 26, 1845. He 
read law with George Barstow, Esq., at Hillsborough, and Hon. Ira Perley, of Concord. 
He was appointed Second Lieutenant of the Third United States Artillery, March 8, 
1847 ; and First Lieutenant in same, Dec. 4, 1847. He died at Boston, June 19, 1853, in 
the twenty-ninth year of his age. 

|| Samuel H. Ayer was born at Eastport, Me., in 1819. He was educated at Bowdoin 



312 adjutant-general's report. 

FIFTH BRIGADE. 

Edward Wyman, Brigadier-General. 
John H. Higbee, Aide-decamp. 
Alfred Story, Brigade-Inspector. 
John H. Lewis, Brigade Quartermaster. 
Larkin G. Mead, Judge- Advocate. 

REGIMENTAL FIELD-OFFICERS. 

1. Josiah G. Hadley,* Colonel. 
Andrew J. Beck, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Theodore F. Kowe, Major. 
William G. Hadley, Adjutant. 
"William P. Gookin, Quartermaster. 

2. Thomas Stackpole, Colonel. 
Andrew E. Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John A. French, Major. 

Luke Wentworth, Adjutant. - 
Everett Wescott, Quartermaster. 

3. John T. Blake, Colonel. 

David Marston, jr., Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Jeremiah Poor, Major. 

Sewell Brown, Adjutant. 

James M. Goodwin, Quartermaster. 

College. He read law with Messrs. Pierce & Fowler, of Concord. He was admitted 
to the bar of Hillsborough County in 1841, and settled in Hillsborough in the practice 
of his profession. He represented the town in the Legislature for 1845, '46, '47, '48, and 
'49, and was Speaker of the House the last two years. He was appointed Solicitor for 
the County in 1847. He removed to Manchester in 1850, and in 1852 was one of the 
commission for revising the statutes of the State. He died suddenly (of over-doses of 
morphine), Oct. 4, 1853, aged thirty-four years. Mr. Ayer was successful, but un- 
scrupulous in the practice of his profession. 

* Col. Josiah G. Hadley, of Portsmouth, was born at Bow, Dec. 15, 1800. His busi- 
ness for many years has been that of a hotel-keeper. He was appointed Captain of the 
First Company of Light Infantry in the First Regiment, June 29,1833; Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the First Regiment, Jan. 14, 1837; and Colonel, June 24, 1842. He was ap- 
pointed Brigadier-General of the First Brigade, June 20, 1844, and was discharged 
June 11, 1846. He represented the town of Portsmouth in the Legislature in 1836. 
March 28, 1837, Gen. Hadley was appointed Deputy Marshal for the District of Xew- 
Hampshire ; and in 1840 he was elected Treasurer for the County of Rockingham. 

In 1858, he was appointed Inspector of Customs for the port of Portsmouth ; and in 
1861 he was appointed Captain of " the Old Guards," a company of volunteers from the 
city of Portsmouth, which company was stationed at Fort Constitution upon the com- 
mencement of the rebellion, and remained there until relieved by the State troops. 
Gen. Hadley is a popular landlord, and enjoys the respect and confidence of his 
fellow-citizens. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 313 

4. John S. Meserve, Colonel. 

Benjamin R. Perkins, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joel Rollins, Major. 
George T. Tebbetts, Adjutant. 
Ebenezer Jay, Quartermaster. 

5. Stillman Spaulding, Colonel. 

Ethan Willoughby, Lieutenant-ColoneL 
William Cross, Major. 
.Charles H. Nutt, Adjutant. 
Porter B. Eastman, Quartermaster. 

6. Ezekiel P. Pierce, jr., Colonel. 
Levi Green, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Benjamin Reed, Major. 
Henry M. Day, Adjutant. 
Norton E. Pratt, Quartermaster. 

7. Moses Page, Colonel. 

Charles Sanborn, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Benjamin H. Tilton, Major. 
Nathan B. Tilton, Adjutant. 
Samuel Calef, Quartermaster. 

8. Nathan Richardson, Colonel. 
Ira W. Ring, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
John M. Tyler, Major. 

John Woodbury, Adjutant. 
Ebenezer Burt, Quartermaster. 

9. John Gregg, Colonel. 

Jason Philbrick, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Samuel B. Hammond, Major. 
John G. Eaton, Adjutant. 
Henry C. Gould, Quartermaster. 

10. Cyrus Gilman, Colonel. 

Benjamin F. Weeks, Lieutenant- Colonel. 
David K. Smith, Major. 
Albert M. Chase, Adjutant. 
Benjamin B. Clifford, Quartermaster. 



314 ADJUTANT-GENERAI/S REPORT. 

11. William R. Parker, Colonel. 

Aaron Whittemore, jr.,* Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Benjamin Gale, jr., Major. 
Nathaniel B. Baker ,f Adjutant. 
John Priest, Quartermaster. 

12. Nelson Converse, Colonel. 

Charles A. Jewell, Lieutenant-ColoneL 
George Bryant, Major. 
Ambrose W. Spaulding, Adjutant. 
Samuel T. Wilder, jr., Quartermaster. 

13. Aaron P. Gould, Colonel. 

Michael P. Merrill, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Isaiah E. Emmerson, Major. 

Moses Learned, Adjutant. 

Francis A. Cushman, Quartermaster. 



* Col. Aaron Whittemore is the son of Hon. Aaron Whittemore, of Pembroke, and 
great-grandson of the Rev. Aaron Whittemore, the first minister of Pembroke (then 
Suncook). He was born in Pembroke, Nov. 4, 1808. 

He was appointed Ensign of the Second Company of Infantry in the Eleventh Regi- 
ment, June 14, 1828; promoted Lieutenant, Sept. 6, 1832; Captain, April 29, 1833; 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the Eleventh Regiment, June 27, .1839; and Colonel of the same, 
July 6, 1846. He was promoted Brigadier-General of the Third Brigade, June 4, 1851. 
He represented his native town in the Legislature in 1849 and '50, and also was a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention of 1850. 

He was appointed Associate Justice of the Court of Common Pleas for Merrimack 
County, July 1, 1853. 

Gen. Whittemore is a successful farmer upon the homestead of his father and grand- 
father. 

t Nathaniel B. Baker is tbe son of Lieut. Abel Baker, of Concord, and was born in 
Henniker, Sept. 29, 1819. He graduated at Harvard College in the class of 1839 ; read 
law with Messrs. Pierce & Fowler, and, from 1841 to 1845, was one of the proprietors 
and editors of the "New-Hampshire Patriot." In 1841, he was Quartermaster of the 
Eleventh Regiment; was appointed Adjutant of the same in 1842, as above, and held 
the office the following year. In 1844 and '45, he was Aide to Gov. Steele, with rank of 
Colonel. In 1846, he was appointed Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, and of the 
Superior Court for the- County of Merrimack. He was Representative from Concord, 
and Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1850 and '51, and Elector of President 
and Vice-President in 1852. In 1854, he was elected Governor of New-Hampshire, and 
served as Chief Magistrate one year. Subsequently he took up his residence in Clinton, 
Iowa, having an appointment as attorney for the railroad in that vicinity. At the 
commencement of the late war, he was appointed Adjutant- General of Iowa, and now 
holds that office ; having performed its duties, during the trials of the rebellion, with his 
usual promptness and energy. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 315 

14. John Prescott, Colonel. 

James P. Pattee, jr., Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Jesse Ladd, Major. 

John P. Rogers, Adjutant. 

Parker P. Prescott, Quartermaster. 

15. Herman H. Cummin gs, Colonel. 
Philemon Tolles, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
P. G. C. Merrill, Major. 

Charles Colby, Adjutant. 

Samuel T. Powers, Quartermaster. 

16. John M. Glidden, Colonel. 
David Starrett, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Robert Clark, Major. 

, Adjutant. 

Samuel H. Grinnell, Quartermaster. 

17. Levi Bean, Colonel. 

Jacob Elliot, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Levi S. Brown, Major. 

Rufus Hall, Adjutant. 

John M. Turner, Quartermaster. 

18. James Drake, Colonel. 

Joseph D. Batchelder, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Richard J. Sanborn, Major. 
Joseph W. James, Adjutant. 
Levi B. Philbrick, Quartermaster. 

19. Nathaniel B. Hoit, Colonel. 
Joseph Colby, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Daniel G. Bedee, Major. 
Edward S. Moulton, Adjutant. 
Christopher C. Fellows, Quartermaster. 

20. Levi Barker, Colonel. 

George D. Dort, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jairus Snow, Major. 
Otis F. R. Waite,* Adjutant. 
Charles J. Wilder, Quartermaster. 

* Maj. Otis F. R. Waite is of Claremont. He was born in Chester, Vt., March 3, 
1818. He is a printer by trade, and resided in Keene some years. He was appointed 
Quartermaster of the Twentieth Regiment, Feb. 10, 1841; Adjutant, Aug. 8, 1842; En- 



316 adjutant-general's report. 

21. Nathan P. Ames, Colonel. 

John S. Pressey, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jacob Carr, Major. 
Milton Morrill, Adjutant. 
Charles C. Coffin, Quartermaster. 

22. Joel Brown, Colonel. 

Putnam Woodward, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Asa E. Woods, Major. 
Joel F. Brown, Adjutant. 
Robert Fulton, Quartermaster. 

23. Enoch G. Woods, Colonel. 

Daniel Storrs, jr., Lieutenant-Colonel. 
William P. Willis, Major. 
James H. Pushee, Adjutant. 
H. P. Allen, Quartermaster. 

24. Hazen Bedell, Colonel. 

William B. Fletcher, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Enoch T. Harvey, Major. 

Amos W. Drew, Adjutant. 

Samuel W. Johnson, Quartermaster. 

25. John D. Pierce, Colonel. 
Alfred Hoit,* Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph S. Burnham, Major. 
David K. Montgomery, Adjutant. 
William H. Young, Quartermaster. 

sign of the " Keene Light Infantry," Aug. 22, 1846; Lieutenant in 1847; and Major of 
that regiment, June 20, 1844. He moved to Springfield, Mass., in 1850, and was assist- 
ant editor of the " Springfield Daily Republican " for two years; was proprietor and 
editor of the " Berkshire County Eagle " for one year; moved to Claremont, X. H., in 
April, 1854, and edited the " National Eagle " for five years; was Engrossing Clerk of 
the New-Hampshire Legislature in 1856 and '57 ; Insurance Commissioner for New- 
Hampshire inl858, '59, and '60 ; assistant editor of the " American Stock Journal," pub- 
lished in New York, from 1859 to 1863; in 1861, was appointed Secretary of the Military 
Committee of the Executive Council, by Gov. Goodwin, re-appointed by Gov. Berry; 
and is now writing a history of Claremont's connection with the rebellion, by appoint- 
ment of a meeting of the citizens of Claremont. 

* Alfred Hoit is of Lee. He was appointed First Lieutenant of the company of 
artillery in the Twenty-fifth Regiment, Sept. 19, 1831; Captain, Sept. 4, 1834; Major 
of the Twenty-fifth Regiment, June 27, 1839; Lieutenant-Colonel, July 2, 1841; 
Colonel, June 20, 1844; and Brigadier-General of the Second Brigade, June 30, 1845. 
He was Representative from the town of Lee in 1849 and '50 ; and was Senator from 
the First Senatorial District in 1851 and '52. Gen. Hoit is a farmer, and a man of 
energy and influence. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 317 

26. George Smart, Colonel. 

Horace Eaton, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jonathan J. Hasley, Major. 
Luther Aiken, Adjutant. 
Erastus H. Bartlett, Quartermaster. 

27. Henry A. P. B. Hyde, Colonel. 
Joseph Smith, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Bradstreet Doe, Major. 

Cyrus K. Drake, Adjutant. 

George A. Beacham, Quartermaster. 

28. James Cheever, Colonel. 

Benjamin F. Phelps, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Thomas Laws, Major. v 

George F. Emerson, Adjutant. 
Francis R. Peters, Quartermaster. 

29. Matthias M. Moore, Colonel. 
Joseph S. Neal, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Joseph B. Atkinson, Major. 
Ezekiel Adams, Adjutant. 
Eliphalet Glidden, Quartermaster. 

30. Giles Bartlett, Colonel. 

Moses Cilley, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Thomas J. Chadwick, Major. 
John Cutler, Adjutant. 
Lucas Nelson, Quartermaster. 

31. Jacob Eedington, Colonel. 
Putnam George, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
David R. Hall, Major. 

Hartford Sweet, Adjutant. 
Benjamin F. Sawyer, Quartermaster. 

32. Sullivan G. Hutchins, Colonel. 
James M. Spooner, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Orrin Garnsey, Major. 

John H. French, Adjutant. 

John B. Sutherland, Quartermaster. 



318 adjutant-general's report. 

33. James J. Chesley, Colonel. 

Enoch W. Plumer, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jonathan W. Sanborn, Major. 
Leonard S. Nute, Adjutant. 
Moses H. Chesley, Quartermaster. 

34. David C. Willey, Colonel. 

Solomon S. Sleeper, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Samuel H. Rollins, Major. 
Sherburne S. Merrill, Adjutant. 
Josiah S. Prescott, Quartermaster. 

35. Asa Dolloff, Colonel. 

Jonathan P. Burnham, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Jede/liah C. Woodbury, Major. 
Joseph Savage, Adjutant. 
Joseph Atwood, Quartermaster. 

36. Samuel P. Meserve, Colonel. 
Leavitt Hill, jr., Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Elias M. Hall, Major. 

Timothy S. Kilgore, Adjutant. 
Herman B. Thompson, Quartermaster. 

3T. Eliphalet C. Gilman, Colonel. 
Cyrus Corliss, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Gilbert H. Rollins, Major. 
0. A. J. Vaughan,* Adjutant. 
H. S. Currier, Quartermaster. 

38. Asa P. Cate,f Colonel. 

True Edmunds, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Edward Langmaid, Major. 
Joseph A. Cofran, Adjutant. 
Hiram Cilley, Quartermaster. 

* Lieut.-Col. O. A. J. Vaughan was born in Hanover, March 11, 1819. He read law 
with Hon. Jonathan Kittredge, of Canaan, and commenced practice at Gilmanton in 
1846. He was appointed Adjutant of the Thirty-seventh Regiment, Aug. 28, 1841; 
and promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel of that regiment, June 20, 1844. He moved to 
Laconia in 1857. He was elected Senator from Senatorial District Xo. 6 in 1866 and 
'67. He is now editor of the " Laconia Democrat." 

t Col. Asa P. Gate was born in Sanbornton, June 1, 1813. He read law with Hon. 
George W. Nesmith, of Franklin, and commenced its practice at Xorthfield in 1838. 
He was appointed Lieutenant of the Second Company of Light Infantry in the Thirty- 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPHIRE. 319 

39. Jeremiah Roberts, Colonel. 

Jacob J. Garland, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Emery J. Dame, Major. 

James Badger, Adjutant. 

John F. Roberts, Quartermaster. 

40. David M. Eaton, Colonel. 

Hazen Kimball, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Calvin A. Davis, Major. 

John Barker, Adjutant. 

Richard F. Morgan, Quartermaster. 

41. , Colonel. 

, Lieutenant-Colonel. 

, Major. 

42. John S. Wells,* Colonel. 

Roswell M. Richardson, Lieutenant-Colonel. 
"William D. Weeks, Major. 
George A. Cossitt, Adjutant. 
James A. McKeen, Quartermaster. 

It was hoped by the friends of the militia that the Militia 
Law of the Revised Statutes, prepared, as it had been, by 
competent commissioners, and matured from the experience 
of a half century, would remain the law of the State for 
some length of time. But in this they were mistaken. 
Innovation and change became the order of the day upon 

eighth Regiment, Sept. 4, 1833; Captain, Aug. 11,1834; Major of the Thirty-eighth 
Regiment, July 3, 1837; Lieutenant-Colonel, June 29, 1838; and Colonel, June 27, 1839. 
He represented the town of Northfield in the Legislature in 1839 and '40; and was 
elected Senator for Senatorial District No. 4 in 1844 and '45, and President of that body 
the last year. Col. Cate is a sound lawyer, of retiring habits, and extensive influence. 
* Col. JohnS. Wells was of Lancaster, and a lawyer by profession, having read law 
in Vermont. He moved to Lancaster in 1837, and commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession. He represented his adopted town in the Legislature in 1839, '40, '41, and '42, 
being Speaker of the House of Representatives the latter year. He removed to Exeter 
in 1847, and was appointed Attorney-General, Jan. 17, 1848, but resigned shortly after. 
He was Senator from Senatorial District No. 2 in 1851 and '52, and President of that 
body both years. In January, 1855, he was appointed United States Senator, to fill 
out the unexpired term of Hon. Moses Norris, deceased. Col. Wells was a persever- 
ing, energetic man. He started in life as a cabinet-maker, and, ambitious of a profes- 
sion, he labored at his trade until he acquired the means of obtaining a profession. He 
was a good lawyer, and an eloquent advocate. He died at Exeter, Aug. 1, 1861, aged 
fifty-six years. 



320 adjutant-general's report. 

the subject of the militia. While a large portion of the 
people favored the law, there were others opposed to it. 
Some opposed it on the score of its expense ; others de- 
claimed against it for the alleged immoral tendency of 
military parades; and still others because, as they said, 
war and all its accompaniments was an evil. The favorers 
of the militia were the most numerous, but the opposers of 
it were the most active and clamorous. At length, the 
question took a political turn ; and in 1846 the Legislature 
virtually abolished the militia system of the State by repeal- 
ing the leading features of the old law, — those requiring 
musters and trainings, except only the annual training in 
May for inspection, and the annual enrolment of all per- 
sons liable to perform military duty. 

It is hardly necessary to particularize the provisions of 
the law of 1846, as it was condemned by the people, and, 
in June, 1847, was repealed, and the old law re-established 
in its stead, with some amendments. 

The law of 1847 enacted that no certificate of surgeon 
or surgeon's mate should be valid unless approved and signed 
by the selectmen or mayor of the town or city in which the 
applicant resided ; provided that all persons between the ages 
of thirty-five and forty-five, liable to perform military duty, 
should be enrolled as conditional exempts ; provided for 
an annual encampment of all the officers of each regiment, 
except chaplain, surgeon, and surgeon's mate, at some 
central place within the limits of the brigade, between the 
first and fifteenth days of September, for instruction in the 
school of the soldier, and other martial exercises, said 
encampment to continue for not less than three and no 
more than five successive days, — the brigadier-general of 
the brigade to appoint a drill-master for the school in his 
brigade, to be commissioned as major by the Governor, and 
to be present and inspect and review the same, the drill- 
master to receive, as a compensation for his services, five 
dollars per day from the State ; stipulated the arms of the 
officers at the schools of instruction ; provided for the 
payment of officers attending the schools of instruction; 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 821 

providing that no parade or school of instruction should be 
ordered on the day of general election ; stipulating fines for 
non-attendance of officers duly notified to attend the school 
of instruction ; providing for the appointment of musters 
between the 15th of September and the 15th of October 
annually ; authorizing the Governor to sell or exchange 
unserviceable military property belonging to the State ; 
making provision for moneys paid soldiers under the law 
of 1846 ; and repealing certain sections of that law, and 
all laws conflicting with the provisions of the present law. 



THE MEXICAN WAR. 
gen. taylor's campaign. 

The difficulties long existing between the American and 
Mexican governments culminated in open war in the spring 
of 1846, when a reconnoitring party, from Gen. Taylor's 
" Army of Occupation," encamped on the east bank of the 
Rio Grande, under Capt. Thornton, was attacked by a supe- 
rior force under Gen. Torrejon, and the entire party killed 
or taken prisoners. The battles of " Palo Alto," " Resaca 
de la Palma," and the brave defence of Fort Brown that 
soon followed, should have given the vaunting Mexicans a 
prestige of the unequal contest to follow ; but it required 
the lessons of "Monterey" and " Buena Vista" to lower 
their vanity, and convince them that treble numbers and 
military display were not equal to a contest with cool cour- 
age and determined bravery. 

Gen. Ampudia had retreated before Gen. Taylor's gallant 
and conquering army, but determined to make a stand at 
Monterey, a strongly fortified town lying within a fold of 
the arroyo San Juan.* Monterey had been founded more 
than two centuries. Originally having strong defences, 
these had been strengthened and extended during the 

* " Arroyo " designates, or is the Mexican name for, a small river that empties into 
a large river having the same name. 

21 



322 adjutant-general's report. 

intestine wars, but of late had largely increased with a view 
to a stout resistance against our army. 

Gen. Taylor encamped his army within three miles of 
the town, on the 19th of September, 1846, at a grove of 
walnut-trees, and springs of pure water, known as " Wal- 
nut Springs," and determined to carry the town by assault. 
A reconnoissance of the enemy, on the 19th, revealed the 
facts that a large work had been constructed, commanding 
all the northern approaches to the town ; and that the 
Bishop's Palace and the heights in the vicinity, near the 
Saltillo road, had been fortified and occupied by troops and 
artillery ; and that it was practicable to turn all the works 
in that direction, and thus cut the enemy's line of commu- 
nication. Accordingly, Gen. Taylor ordered Brig. -Gen. 
Worth, commander of the Second Division, to march with 
his command on the 20th to turn the hill of the Bishop's 
Palace, to occupy a position on the Saltillo road, and to 
carry the enemy's detached works in that quarter when 
practicable. At two o'clock, p.m., on the 20th, the Second 
Division took up its march. It was soon seen that Gen. 
Worth's movement had been discovered by the enemy, and 
that troops were being thrown towards the Bishop's Palace 
and the heights that commanded it. This fact was commu- 
nicated to Gen. Worth ; and, to direct the attention of the 
enemy, Gens. Twiggs and Butler were ordered with their 
divisions to make a display in front of the town, as if for 
attack. Gen. Worth encamped for the flight in a defensive 
position in the direction of the Saltillo road. On the 
morning of the 21st, Gen. Taylor commenced a spirited 
attack upon the city to divert the enemy's attention while 
Gen. Worth gained a position upon the Saltillo road, and 
thus cut off the enemy's line of communication. This was 
not done without hard fighting ; the enemy opposing in 
force, and being repulsed with heavy loss. Gen. Worth 
then succeeded in carrying the heights south of the Saltillo 
road, the guns taken in one of the forts being turned upon 
the Bishop's Palace.* 

* Gen. Taylor's official report. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 323 

But we will let one who was engaged in these actions 
give the particulars : — 

" Monterey, Mexico, Oct. 6, 1846. 

" Between one and two o'clock, p.m., on the 20th, the 
Second Division took up the line of march, taking only two 
days' provisions, and leaving all the baggage. We also car- 
ried plenty of intrenching tools. We marched along in 
front of the town, keeping out of the range of their guns, 
and cutting a road all the way through the fields and 
chaparrals, until we arrived at the foot of the mountain on 
the north of the town. We then turned to the left, keeping 
along the base of the hills, until we came up nearly within 
range of their guns ; we then halted until dark. The light 
troops in advance had been skirmishing all the evening, but 
there was no damage done. After dark, we moved on 
about one mile and a half, and bivouacked for the night. 
Early on the morning of the 21st, we commenced moving 
around the town. The Mexicans had ascertained our inten- 
tions, and strengthened the guards at the north and west 
of the town. The enemy commenced throwing shot and 
shell at us as soon as they could see, but most of them 
went over us. Our object was to gain the Saltillo road. 
When the head of the column had arrived near the road, 
the Texan Rangers, who were in front as light troops, 
were charged upon by a body of lancers, supposed to num- 
ber about seven hundred. These were supported by an 
equal number who did not come into action. The charge 
was soon checked, the colonel who led it having been killed 
at the first fire. A few shells thrown among them sent 
them off as fast as they came. These lancers behaved 
better in this charge than we had ever seen them before. 
We had four men wounded, and the Mexicans left about 
twenty killed. We then formed a line of battle across the 
Saltillo road, and waited for their attack ; but they did not 
care about coming to close quarters. We remained here 
for some two hours, exposed to a severe fire from a nine- 
pounder stationed on a hill ■ back of the town. Capt. 
McKasket of the Eighth Infantry was killed, and a private 
of the Fifth Infantry had his leg shot off, while in this 
position. We then retired out of the range of their guns, 
still occupying the Saltillo road. About twelve o'clock, M., 
Capt. Smith, of the artillery, was ordered to take four hundred 
men, and storm the hill from which they had been firing 



324 adjutant-general's report. 

during the morning. Soon after, the Seventh Infantry was 
ordered up to support Capt. Smith. The Seventh marched 
out by file through some cornfields, keeping near the river 
until they arrived opposite the hill, then turned to the right 
and crossed the river, and got under the shelter of a ledge 
at the foot of the hills. For a quarter of a mile before 
getting under the ledge, the regiment was exposed to a 
sharp fire of grape and musketry. The bank of the river 
was some fifteen or twenty feet high, and each man had to 
lower himself down into the water by the aid of the bushes 
growing on the bank. The river was some three feet deep 
and very rapid, so that the men were necessarily a long 
time in fording it. I mention this fact to show you the 
length of time we were exposed to this fire ; and, what is 
the most remarkable, not a man was hit during the 
exposure. I could hardly Relieve it at the time. When we 
arrived at the hill, we saw nothing of Capt. Smith's party, 
and concluded that he had gone up some other way. As we 
were only to support Capt. Smith, we had to remain here 
until his arrival. In the mean time, a party was sent part 
way up the hill to divert the enemy's attention. The enemy 
came down part way to meet us, but we drove them to the 
summit in a few moments. In this affair we had two men 
wounded. About one hundred Texans then came up, and 
took the hill without opposition, as but few guns were fired. 
We took a nine-pounder and some ammunition on this hill. 
Capt. Smith's command was composed in part of Texans ; 
and, to do them justice, I must say that the best soldiers 
never behaved better. The Fifth Infantry was then ordered 
over, and we were directed to take Fort Soldado, about 
three fourths of a mile further down on the same hill. We 
stormed the fort in ' good style,' advancing under a smart 
fire of grape and musketry. The height was defended by 
about seven hundred men. The enemy retreated as soon 
as our men gained the work. Our loss was four or five 
killed, and probably ten or fifteen wounded. The following 
corps of troops were engaged in this affair : The Fifth and 
Seventh Infantry, a company of Louisiana volunteers, a part 
of the First Regiment of Texans, all under command of 
Gen. Smith. We took in this fort a nine-pounder, a 
large quantity of ammunition, tents, camp equipage, etc. 
As soon as the hill was taken, we commenced firing on the 
Bishop's Palace with their own guns. As soon as the hill 
was in our possession, they commenced throwing shells at 
this fort. Knowing the position of the ammunition, they 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 325 

hoped to blow up the fort; however, they did no damage. 
The Seventh Infantry garrisoned the hill during the night. 
The next morning at daylight (22d) the height back of the 
Bishop's Palace was carried by the artillery battalion, the 
Eighth Infantry, and a few Texans. During the forenoon, a 
howitzer was taken on to the height, and commenced play- 
ing on the Bishop's Palace. Every shot told. The enemy, 
finding this place too hot to be pleasant, made a sortie to 
get possession of the howitzer, but our troops formed and 
soon sent them scampering back. The greater part of our 
troops stationed on this height had kept out of sight and 
under shelter after taking it. As the enemy's infantry 
retired, a large body of lancers charged us, to cover their 
retreat, but a discharge of musketry and a shell from the 
howitzer made them show remarkably light heels. Our 
troops pursued, and entered the Bishop's Palace with them, 
drove them out (that is, those who attempted to stop), down 
the hill, into the town. We had thus gained all the enemy's 
works on this side of the town. We took four guns on this 
hill, and a large quantity of ammunition and other military 
stores. The greater part of the Second Division had been 
ordered up by the time these works were taken. Before 
this, the troops under Gen. Taylor had effected a lodgment 
in the town, and continued driving the enemy from house to 
house, inch by inch. On the morning of the 23d, Gen. 
Worth sent out a detachment to take possession of a gorge 
near Santo Catorina, designing to enter the town the fol- 
lowing night ; but, hearing the heavy firing on the opposite 
side of the town, he ordered his force to commence an im- 
mediate attack upon the city in two divisions, and to press 
on to the main Plaza. The enemy fought with desperation, 
and disputed every foot of the ground. Our men had to 
cut through the walls of the houses and yards, thus passing 
from one house to another, driving everything before them. 
The houses are built of stone, and the walls are at least 
eighteen inches in thickness, and are connected by thick 
walls of the same material. Loopholes had been cut in 
the houses and walls, the flat roofs were defended with 
sandbags, and the streets were all barricaded. Our troops, 
finding that they could not advance up the streets without 
great loss, entered the houses and yards, and commenced 
cutting their way through. The enemy had not counted on 
this mode of advancing. Our troops continued at this work 
until the morning of the 24th, night and day. At this time 
we had driven them all up to the principal Plaza, nearly two 



326 

miles beyond the point from which we started ; at seven 
o'clock, a.m., we were within short rifle-shot of them on all 
sides, and perfectly sheltered. We had a twelve-pound how- 
itzer mounted in the second story of a house, and a six-pound 
gun on the top of one of the houses ; the howitzer bearing on 
the door of the cathedral, where all the ammunition was, and 
within short range. The ten-inch mortar was planted the 
evening before, and had thrown several shells into the Plaza 
during the night, one of which struck the cathedral. Thus 
stood affairs on the north and west of the Plaza on the morn- 
ing of the 24th. On the other side, the First and Third Divis- 
ions had driven them all up to the principal Plaza, and had 
taken all their outworks except the large fort on the other side 
of the town, and in an hour more we could have killed hun- 
dreds of them without much loss on our part. The Mexicans, 
seeing that things were not going as well as they could 
wish, sent in a flag of truce. The truce lasted until night, 
when they came to terms. Gen. Taylor allowed them to 
march out with the honors of war, under arms, and to take 
with ' them six pieces of artillery, they to give up all other 
arms and military stores. With what we had taken, we 
have thirty-five pieces of ordnance, an immense quantity of 
small-arms, ammunition enough for the conquest of Mexico, 
and a great many stores of all kinds. Thus ended the 
taking of Monterey ; but it has cost us some of our best 
officers and men. We have about five hundred killed and 
wounded. Of this number there are only sixty-eight in the 
Second Division. We had eleven officers killed and ten 
wounded, belonging to the regular army, in that division ; 
the number of volunteer officers I have not been able to 
ascertain. The Mexicans probably lost many more than we 
did ; but they were fighting under cover of good fortifica- 
tions, and were never exposed to our fire, except when we 
were driving them from one position to another. Our 
troops had some of the hardest kind of fighting. They 
charged under a cross-fire from three or four points. Whole 
platoons were cut down at a discharge, and still others came 
up to fill their places, and were in turn cut down. But, 
notwithstanding all this, our brave troops did the duty 
assigned to them, and*did it nobly. Mexicans cannot stand 
before such soldiers. Our little army is sadly cut up. In 
saying this, I refer to the regular troops. The regiments 
were small enough before, but now some of them do not 
contain two companies. The volunteers behaved well, 
especially those from Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas ; 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 327 

they behaved like men and Americans. I would write 
more, but I do not feel able. I cannot as yet sit up in bed : 
I write a few moments at a time, as I lay. 

" Yours, J. H. P." * 

In January, 1847, a large part of Gen. Taylor's army 
had been turned over to Gen. Scott, who was making prep- 
arations to operate against the Mexicans upon the Gulf coast. 
On the last of January, rumors were rife at Monterey that 
Gen. Santa Anna was advancing against Monterey from 
San Luis Potosi with an overwhelming force. Leaving 
fifteen hundred men to guard Monterey, early in February 
Gen. Taylor hastened forward with his forces to join Gen. 
Worth at Saltillo, where a strong redoubt had been con- 
structed, commanding the town and plain. Leaving Capt. 
Webster to occupy the redoubt, and Maj. Warren with four 

* Joseph Hayden Potter is the son of Thomas D. Potter, of Concord, where he was 
born Oct. 12, 1821. He was, for most of the years 1837 and '38, resident with an uncle 
in Portsmouth, preparing for college, and, the latter year, assistant in the male High 
School in that city. Receiving the appointment of Cadet through the recommendation 
of Hon. Samuel Cushman, of Portsmouth, he entered West Point Academy in 1839, 
and graduated in 1843; was Brevet Second Lieutenant First Infantry, Julyl, 1843; 
attached to the Seventh Infantry in 1845; severely wounded in the battle of Monterey, 
Sept. 21, 1846; brevetted First Lieutenant "for gallant and meritorious conduct in the 
battle of Monterey, Mexico," Sept. 21, 1846; appointed First Lieutenant, Oct. 30, 1847; 
Adjutant of the Seventh Regiment United States Infantry, for some four years prior 
to January, 1856 ; appointed Captain, Jan. 7, 1856, and assigned to Company G, Seventh 
United States Infantry; ordered with regiment to Utah Territory, February, 185S, 
thence with regiment to New Mexico, May 15, 1860 ; surrendered by Maj. Lynde to 
Texan insurgents, July 27, 1861 ; took command of the surrendered troops after their 
parole, and marched them across the country to Fort Leavenworth, Mo., and from 
thence to Jefferson Barracks, Mo., arriving there November, 1861 ; commanding regi- 
ment at Fort Niagara from March, 1862, until Sept. 17, 1862; then exchanged, and 
appointed Colonel of the Twelfth New-Hampshire Volunteer Regiment, assuming 
command of the same the 21st of that month ; severely wounded in the battle of 
Chancellorsville and taken prisoner, May 3, 1863; exchanged Oct. 20, 1863; ordered 
to Columbus, Ohio, as Assistant Provost-Marshal, Feb. 15. 1864; joined regiment Sept. 
16,1864; in command of a brigade in the Eighteenth Corps, until Dec. 2, 1864, and 
then assigned to the command of the Second Brigade, Eighth Division, Twenty-fourth 
Corps; appointed Chief of Staff of the Twenty-fourth Corps, Jan. 16, 1865; assigned to 
command of Second Brigade, Second Division, Twenty-fourth Corps, July 10, 1865 ; 
appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers, May 1, 1865; served with Twenty-fourth 
Corps until it was broken up, in August, 1865; and mustered out of volunteer service, 
Jan. 16, 1866; commissioned Major of the Nineteenth Regiment United States Infan- 
try, July 4, 1863 ; brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, Dec. 13, 1862, " for 
gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va." ; brevetted 
Colonel United States Army, May 3, 1863, for gallant and meritorious service at the 
battle of Chancellorsville, Va. ; brevetted Brigadier-General United States Army, 
March 13, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services in the campaign terminating 
with the surrender of the insurgent army under Gen. Robert E. Lee; and commis- 
sioned Lieutenant-Colonel in the Thirtieth United States Infantry, July 28, 1866. 
Gen. Potter's services and their appreciation can best be estimated by his military 
record. 



328 adjutant-general's report. 

companies of Illinois volunteers to guard the town, on the 
8th of February Gen. Taylor, with the remainder of his 
troops, about five thousand, moved forward to Agua Nueva ; 
a position having a large plain for drilling his troops, and 
at the same time affording observation of the road from 
San Luis Potosi. In case of an attack by the enemy in 
force, he determined to fall back in front of the hacienda of 
Buena Yista, about seven miles south of Saltillo. 

He was not long in doubt as to the intentions of the 
Mexican General, for. repeated reconnoissances established 
the fact that Santa Anna was concentrating a large force in 
his front for the purpose of an immediate attack. Accord- 
ingly, on the morning of the 22d of February, Gen. Taylor 
fell back upon Buena Yista to await the approach of the 
enemy. He had not to wait long ; for Santa Anna, sure of 
victory, knowing that a large part of Taylor's force had 
been withdrawn from him, by nine o'clock came rushing 
over the distant hills twenty thousand strong, with colors 
flying, drums beating, trumpets sounding, horses neighing, 
men shouting, and wheels rumbling, as if to crush the feeble 
band of Americans before him amid the din and noise of 
his serried hosts. But those stout hearts before him cared 
little for the vast numbers, gay uniforms, flaunting penons, 
or glittering pikes and bayonets of the wily Mexicans. They 
nobly stood their ground, nobly sustained the reputation of 
the American soldier, and, after a day of hard fighting and 
unparalleled struggling for the mastery, the darkness of the 
night that followed veiled the retreat of the discomfited 
Mexicans; and a glorious morning revealed to this band 
of sturdy Americans the fact that they were victorious 
upon the battle-field of Buena Vista. 

Gen. Taylor gave the following short and modest report 
of this splendid battle and great victory to the War De- 
partment at Washington : — 

" Head-quarters Army of Occupation, Camp ox the Field of Battle, 
"Buena Vista, Mexico, Feb. 24, 1847. 

"Sir, — I have the honor to report, that, having become 
assured on the 20th inst. that the enemy had assembled in 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 329 



very heavy force at Encarnacion, thirty miles in front of 
Agua Nueva, with the evident design of attacking my 
position, I broke up my camp at the latter place on the 
21st, and took up a strong line in front of Buena Vista, 
seven miles south of Saltillo. A cavalry force, left at Agua 
Nueva for the purpose of covering the removal of supplies, 
was driven in during the night, and, on the morning of 
the 22d, the Mexican army appeared immediately in front 
of our position. At eleven o'clock, a.m., a flag was sent, 
bearing from Gen. Santa Anna a summons of unconditional 
surrender; to which I immediately returned a negative 
reply. The summons and my reply are herewith enclosed. 
The action was commenced late in the afternoon between 
the light troops on the left flank, but was not seriously 
engaged until the morning of the 2Sd, when the enemy 
made an effort to force the left flank of our position. An 
obstinate and sanguinary conflict was maintained with short 
intervals throughout the day, the result being that the 
enemy was completely repulsed from our lines. An attack 
of cavalry upon the rancho of Buena Vista, and a demon- 
tration upon the city of Saltillo itself, were likewise hand- 
somely repelled. Early in the night, the enemy withdrew 
from his camp and fell back upon Agua Nueva, a distance 
of twelve miles. 

" Our own forces engaged at all points in this action fell 
somewhat short of five thousand four hundred men ; while 
that of the enemy, from the statement of Gen. Santa Anna, 
may be estimated at twenty thousand. Our success against 
such odds is a sufficient encomium on the good conduct of 
our troops. In a more detailed official report, I shall have 
the satisfaction of bringing to the notice of the govern- 
ment the conspicuous gallantry of particular officers and 
corps. I may be permitted here, however, to acknowledge 
my great obligations to Brig.-Gen. Wool, the second in 
command, to whom I feel particularly indebted for his 
valuable services on this occasion. 

" Our loss has been very severe, and will not probably 
fall short of nine hundred men. The Mexican loss has 
been immense. I shall take the earliest opportunity of 
forwarding a correct list of the casualties of the day. 

"I am, sir, very respectfully, 

" Your obedient servant, 

"Z. TAYLOR, 
" May 'or- General U. 8. A. Commanding. 

"The Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D- C." 



330 adjutant-general's report. 

General Taylor gave due credit to the gallant officers of 
his command in the battle of Beuna Vista; and, among the 
number, conspicuous for his arduous duties and cool cour- 
age, was Maj.W.W. S. Bliss,* of New-Hampshire, the Adju- 
tant-General of his army. 

GEN. SCOTT'S CAMPAIGN IN MEXICO. 

It had been determined to send Gen. Scott to attack Yera 
Cruz and the Castle of San Juan de Uloa, and, in case of 
his success, to march upon the capital of Mexico, " the city 
of the Montezumas." Accordingly, in November, 1846, 
Gen. Scott was ordered to the Rio Grande to set on foot that 
expedition. He was to take a large part of the troops under 
Gen. Taylor, leaving him only such a force as was thought 
necessary to hold a defensive position on the line of the 
Sierra Madre. On the 25th of November, 1846, Gen. 
Scott left Washington with orders to repair " to Mexico, to 
take command of the forces there assembled, and partic- 
ularly to organize and set on foot an expedition on the Gulf 
coast," if he should think it practicable. He arrived on the 
Rio Grande the 1st of January, 1847. The troops from 
Gen. Taylor's command were turned over to him, as before 
named ; and he soon left for the Island of Lobos, the place 
of general rendezvous of the fleet and the various detach- 

* Maj. Wm. Wallace Smith Bliss was from Lebanon. His father, John Bliss, was 
appointed Ensign in the Second Infantry, and Second Lieutenant March 1, 1811; First 
Lieutenant in January, 1813; and was Assistant Deputy Quartermaster-General in 
April following, with rank of Captain. He was discharged in June, 1815. Subsequently 
he was a sutler at Mobile Point, and was employed in the engineer department, in the 
construction of the fort at Mobile Point, from 1818 to 1822, and died at Blakely, Ala- 
bama, in 1822. 

His son, W. W. S. Bliss, entered the Military Academy at West Point in 1829; was 
brevetted Second Lieutenant Fourth Infantry, July 1, 1833; Acting Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics at West Point Military Academy, from October, 183-1, to 1837; 
Assistant Professor in 1840; appointed First Lieutenant of the Topographical Engi- 
neers, but declined; Assistant Adjutant-General, with rank of Captain, in October, 
1839; brevetted Major for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Palo Alto 
and Kesaca de la Palma, May 9, 1846, in May, 1848; Assistant Adjutant-General, with 
rank of Major, July 7, 1846; and was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel in May, 1848. for 
gallant and meritorious conduct in the battle of Buena Vista, Feb. 23, 1847. Major 
Bliss married a daughter of General Taylor. He was a fine officer and gallant soldier, 
as well as a man of literary attainments and tastes. The orders, reports, and letters of 
General Taylor, noted for their modesty, pith, and sententious brevity, have been at- 
tributed to his gallant and talented Adjutant-General. 






MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 331 

ments. Gen. Patterson marched with his division from 
Victoria to Tarnpico, and there embarked; Gens. Scott and 
Worth sailed from the Brazos ; and the remainder of the 
troops were to proceed directly from the United States to 
Lobos. Congress had authorized the raising of ten new 
regiments to serve during the war. These were to be raised 
and organized. During the month of February, the various 
detachments arrived that had been ordered to rendezvous 
at Lobos ; and, although many of the supplies had not 
arrived, Gen. Scott determined to lose no time by delay, 
and on the 6th of March the whole fleet hove in sight of 
Yera Cruz. The debarkation of the troops was fixed for 
the 9th of March, and was effected on that day with the 
most perfect order and regularity. The beaching was a 
splendid sight. Gen. Patterson was the ranking officer, 
being a full Major-General, and took command of the forces 
when landed, and they had serious work to do. The Arse- 
nal and the Malebran were defended ; and the following day 
these were both taken, the sand-hills cleared of the foe that 
crowned them, and the Mexican forces driven within the 
walls of Vera Cruz ; so that, upon the landing of Gen. Scott 
on the evening of the second day, he had no enemy to ob- 
struct his operations save from the walls of the city and 
the castle.* A succession of severe northers succeeded, and 
prevented the landing of the mortars and guns, so that it 
was not until the 22d of March that Gen. Scott demanded 
the surrender of the city. The demand was refused, and 
then a tremendous fire was opened upon the city, both sea- 
ward as well as landward ; Com. Tatnall having been 
ordered to commence a simultaneous fire upon the town 
from the flotilla under his command. At length, battery 
after battery being added to the line of investment, and 
horrors upon horrors added to the suffering inhabitants the 
livelong night of the 25th, nothing being heard but the 
booming of cannon, the explosion of bombs, the crash of 

* It is not a little singular that, after such important service, the name of Gen. 
Patterson should hardly have been mentioned in Gen. Scott's report in connection with 
this affair. 






332 adjutant-general's report. 

falling houses, the shrieks of the wounded, and the groans 
of the dying, on the morning of the 26th of March, 1847, 
the batteries ceased playing. Articles of capitulation were 
signed on the 27th, and on the 29th of March the Mexican 
forces marched out of the town, laid down their arms, and 
went their way into the interior. Thus fell the boasted 
impregnable fortress of the Mexicans, leaving Gen. Scott an 
open way to the interior, whither he marched with most 
commendable dispatch on his way to the capital. At the 
heights of Cerro Gordo he met the combined Mexican force 
under Santa Anna, and on the 17th of April, 1847, gained 
the memorable " battle of Cerro Gordo," hurling Santa 
Anna from his supposed impregnable position, and driving 
his demoralized troops in hot haste towards the capital. 
Jalapa, Perote, and Puebla offered little resistance to his 
conquering army ; and at the latter town Gen. Scott reposed 
his army, and awaited his expected re-enforcements. These 
consisted of the Ninth United States Infantry, under Col. 
Trueman B. Ransom, and other detachments, amounting in 
all to two thousand five hundred men, under the command 
of Brig.-Gen. Franklin Pierce, of New-Hampshire. The 
Ninth Regiment of United States Infantry had been recruited 
in New-England, under the auspices of Col. Franklin Pierce, 
of New-Hampshire, as its Colonel ; Abner B. Thompson, of 
Maine, as its Lieutenant-Colonel ; and Gen. Trueman B. 
Eansom, of Vermont, as its Major, — their commissions 
severally bearing date Feb. 16,1847. On the 3d of March, 
Col. Pierce was appointed a Brigadier-General by President 
Polk, and assigned to take command of the detachment of 
troops about to be sent to re-enforce Gen. Scott ; and, on 
the 16th of March, Maj. Ransom was promoted Colonel of 
the regiment in his place, and Thomas H. Seymour, of Con- 
necticut, was appointed a Major in the regiment, — Folliot 
T. Lally, of Maine, having been appointed a Major in the 
same on the 3d of the month. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



333 



The rendezvous of the regiment was at Fort Adams, near 
Newport, where it was organized ; and the roster of its 
field, staff, and company officers was as follows : — 

Roster op the Ninth United States Infantry. 



Date of Com. 



Born in. 



Appointed from. 



COLONEL. 

Trueman B. Ransom, 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL. 

Abner B. Thompson, 

MAJORS. 

Thomas H. Seymour, 
Folliot T. Lally, 

SURGEON. 

Justin E. Stevens, 

ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

John D. Walker,* 
Francis L. Wheaton, 

CAPTAINS. 

Joseph S. Pitman, 
Theodore F. Iiowe,* 
Stephen Woodman, 
E. A. Kimball, 
Andrew T. Palmer, 
Nathaniel S. Webb, 
James W. Thompson, 
Daniel Batehelder, 
Lorenzo Johnson, 
Charles N. JBodflsh,* 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

Alexander Morrow, 
Lyman Bissell, 
John S. Slocum, 
Charles J. Sprague, 
George Bowers, 
John H. Jackson, 
Thomas J. Whipple, 
Albert Tracy, 
Justin Hodge, 
James F. Bragg, 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

Daniel H Cram, 
Asa A. Stoddard, 
Thomas P. Pierce, 
Nathaniel F. Swett, 
Josiah P. Chadbourne, 
Jesse A. Gove,* 
Thompson K. Crosby, 
Alpheus T. Palmer, 
Richard C. Drum, 
John Glackin, 
Edwin A. Whitten, 



April 9, 1847 
April 9, 1847 
April 9, 1847 

April 9, 1847 
April 9, 1847 

April 9, 1847 



April 9, 1847 



April 9, 1847 



Vermont. 



Massachusetts. 



Connecticut. 
New York. 



Massachusetts. 



New-Hampshire . 
Rhode Island. 



New-Hampshire. 

New-Hampshire. 

Maine. 

New-Hampshire. 

Maine. 

Connecticut. 

NeW-Hampshire. 

Vermont. 

Connecticut. 

Maine. 



Maine. 

Connecticut. 

Rhode Island. 

Maine. 

New-Hampshire. 

New-Hampshire. 

New-Hampshire. 

New York. 

Connecticut. 



New-Hampshire. 

Connecticut. 

Massachusetts. 

Maine. 

Maine. 

New-Hampshire. 

Maine. 

Maine. 

Pennsylvania. 

Massachusetts. 

Maine. 



Vermont. 



Maine. 



Connecticut. 
Maine. 



Massachusetts. 



New-Hampshire. 
Rhode Island. 



Rhode Island. 

New-Hampshire. 

Maine. 

Vermont. 

Maine. 

Connecticut. 

Maine. 

New-Hampshire. 

Connecticut. 

Maine. 



Maine. 

Connecticut. 

Rhode Island. 

Massachusetts. 

New-Hampshire. 

New-Hampshire. 

New-Hampshire. 

Maine. 

Connecticut. 

Maine. 



New-Hampshire. 

Connecticut. 

New-Hampshire, 

Maine. 

Army. 

Vermont. 

Maine. 

Maine. 

Pennsylvania. 

Rhode' Island. 

Maine. 



334 



adjutant-general's report. 



Roster of Ninth United States Infantry — concluded. 



NAMES. 


Date of Com. 


Born in. 


Appointed from. 


Robert Hopkins, 


April 9, 1847 


Kentucky. 


Vermont. 


George W. May, 


" 




Army. 


Charles Mmmons, 


a 


Maine. 


Maine. 


Levi Woodhouse, 


« 


Connecticut. 


Connecticut. 


Henry De Wolf, 


" 


Rhode fsland. 


Rhode Island. 


William A. Newman, 


" 


Vermont. 


Vermont. 


James P. Archer, 


«( 


Maryland. 


Maryland. 


Charles L. Low, 


" 




Xew-Hampshire. 


John M. Hathaway, 


24 




Connecticut. 



* Dr. John Dinsmore Walker was from Goffstown, the son of Dr. Walker'of that 
town. He resigned before leaving Vera Cruz, unable to proceed in consequence of a 
rupture. He was an excellent physician, of literary tastes. After leaving the army 
he practised his profession in Manchester, and died suddenly, at Bedford, of an affec- 
tion of the heart. 

The attainments and social qualities of Dr. Walker were highly appreciated by those 
who best knew him, and he numbered a large circle of friends. 

Capt. Rowe was put in command of a company of riflemen, consisting of the short- 
est men in the regiment. 

Capt. Bodfish was placed in command of a company of grenadiers, made up from 
the tallest men in the regiment. 

Lieut. Jesse A. Gove was of Concord. He was born in Weare, in 1824. He was 
educated at Norwich University, and read law with Messrs. Pierce & Fowler. While 
a member of the Norwich University, he was appointed a Second Lieutenant in the 
Ninth Regiment United States Army, raised from New England for the war with 
Mexico. He accompanied his regiment to Puebla, in Mexico, at which place he was 
left in the hospital, and did not participate in the battles in the valley of Mexico. 

In 1849, he was appointed by Gen. Barker, of the Third Division, Division-Inspector 
upon his staff. In 1849 and '50, Col. Gove was Drill-master for the Fourth Brigade; 
in 1850, 51, '52, '53, and '54, he was Deputy Secretary of the State of New-Hampshire; 
in 1855, he was appointed by President Pierce a Captain in the United States Dragoons, 
and was stationed for a time at Utah. 

October 30, 1861, he was commissioned Colonel of the Twenty-second Regiment of 
Massachusetts Volunteers, raised by Senator Wilson. He fell at the head of his regi- 
ment at the battle of Gaines's Mills, June 27, 1862. 

Col. Gove was an excellent officer and gallant soldier, and fell greatly lamented by a 
large circle of friends. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



335 



Companies " C," "H," and "I," with Maj. Lally and 
other officers, sailed from Newport, Friday, May 21, 1847, 
in the "North Bend." Companies "C" and "H" were 
reGruited mainly in New-Hampshire, and their rolls were 
as follows : — 



Eoll of Capt. Daniel Batchelder's Company ( a H "). 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 








[20, '47, at Newport, R. I. 


Daniel Batchelder,* Capt., 


Apr. 9, 1847 


During the war 


On recruiting service, May 


George Bowers,* 1st Lieut., 


•' 


" 


Assumed command of com- 


Daniel H. Cram, 2d " 


" 


it 


[pany May 20, 1847. 


Rich'd C. Drum, 2d " 


" 


" 




John Bedel,* 1st Serg't, 


Mar. 25, 1847 


" 


Bath, N. H. 


John C. Stowell, 2d " 


Apr. 12 


tt 


Concord. 


Ezra T. Pike, 3d " 


8 


a 


Haverhill. 


Geo. C. Spencer, 4th " 


26 


« 


Corinth, Vt. 


Thos. F. Davis, 1st Corp'l, 


12 


a 


Concord. 


J. K. Ramsdell, 2d 


15 


tt 


Bath, N. H. 


Leonard Morrill, 3d " 


27 


tt 


Nashua. 


William D. Parker, Fifer, 


9 


" 


Lisbon. 


George Sumner, Drummer, 


26 


•« 


Corinth, Vt. 


Michael G. Lawton, " 


13 


" 


Northumberland. 


PRIVATES. 








David Amy, 


Apr. 9, 1847 


During the war 


Lisbon. 


Henry Albert, 


20 


" 


Haverhill. 


Kinsman Avery, 
Chandler Averill, 


22 


" 


Haverhill. 


24 


a 


Nashua. 


James Andrews, 


May 1 


a 


Canaan. 


Robert A. Brown, 


Apr. 2 


a 


Concord. 


Benjamin Bean, 


May 1 


n 


Canaan. 


William Burns, 


Apr. 8 


" 


Concord. 


William F. Bailey, 


14 


" 


Concord. 


John Boudle, 


26 


" 


Haverhill. 


John W. Bewer, 


28 


" 


Haverhill. 


George E. Barnes, 


May 4 


tt 


Haverhill. 


Guy Carleton, 


Apr. 14 


tt 


Lisbon. 


Jeremiah E. Curry, 


13 


" 


Concord, [serv., May 20, '47. 


Ferdinand Carson, 


13 


tt 


Bath, N. H. On recruiting 


Caleb Chamberlain, 


19 


" 


Nashua. 


Michael Cochran, 


19 


a 


Concord. 


Samuel Davis, 


12 


" 


Concord. 


David Dunlap, 


12 


" 


Concord. Sick in hospital. 


Joseph Duso, 


15 


" 


Concord. 


Foster Edson, 


15 


« 


Bath. 


John Flynn, 


7 


" 


Haverhill. 


Marshall L. Grant, 


30 


" 


Nashua. Sick in hospital. 


Isaac Grace, 


16 


ts 


Nashua. 


William Gould, jr., 


May 5 


" 


Haverhill. 


Sanford Gardner, 


1 


St 


Canaan. 


Albert Knapp, 


Apr. 19 


tt 


Piermont. 


Nathan W. King, 


20 


<« 


Nashua. 


Joseph E. Little, 


26 


tt 


Haverhill. 


Aaron G. Lane, 


Mar. 31 


tt 


Piermont. 


Lorenzo D. Montgomery, 


29 


tt 


Nashua. 


Bernard McCluskey, 


May 1 


Si 


Canaan. 


Alfred Noyes, 


Apr. 30 


*« 


Nashua. 


Benjamin F. Osgood, 


May 7 


it 


Manchester. [pital. 


Chester Perry, 


Apr. 22 


" 


Waterford, Vt. Sick in hos- 


James Powers, 


14 


it 


Lancaster. 


Michael W. Page, 


19 


It 


Wentworth. 


Benjamin E. Porter, 


15 


" 


Concord. 


Arthur L. Pike, 


19 


" 


Haverhill. 


Asa Randall, 


23 


" 


Haverhill. 


Nahum G. Swett, 


6 


R 


Concord. 



336 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Batchelder's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Suel Simpson, 


Apr. 24, 1847 


During the war 


Bath. 


Daniel M. Smith, 


15 


" 


Lisbon. 


Henry Stevens, 


15 


" 


Concord. 


John H. White, 


28 


u 


Nashua. 


Elijah Wallace, 


2 


<« 


Concord. 


Harvey Wade, 


13 


<< 


Lancaster. 


George W. Woods, 


16 


a 


Haverhill. 


Thomas J. Wiser, 


9 


u 


Lisbon. 


Nelson B. Woodward, 


May 4 


it 


Haverhill. 


John Webster, 


7 


a 


Manchester. 


George Welch, 


Apr. 20 


u 


Haverhill. 


James Williams, 


20 


a 


Haverhill. [corp.Mav20.'47. 


Nathaniel W. White, 


13 


" 


Nashua. Taken on habeas 


William W. Welch, 


20 


" 


Haverhill. Died May 27, '47. 



* Capt. Daniel Batchelder was of Coventry, and was born in Corinth, Yt., May 10, 
1803. He was appointed Adjutant of the Thirteenth Regiment, Aug. 13, 1833, and 
Captain of the Sixth Company of Infantry, March 27, 1839. He represented the town 
of Coventry in the Legislature in 1833, '34, '35, '36, '37, '38, and '39. Subsequently he 
moved to Haverhill, and was Representative from that town in 1845. March 6, 1847, 
he was appointed a Captain in the Ninth (or New-England) Regiment United States 
Infantry, and was detailed for the recruiting service. He resigned March, 1848. Capt. 
Batchelder has been long known in Grafton County as a deputy sheriff and auctioneer 
of tact and ability. 

Lieut. George Bowers is the son of Hon. Jesse Bowers, of Nashua, and was born 
April 22, 1817. He was appointed Ensign in the Second Company of Light Infantry in 
the Fifth Regiment, Aug. 18, 1839 ; and Captain of the same, Sept. 1, 1840. He was 
appointed First Lieutenant of the Ninth United States Infantry, March 11, 1847. He 
commanded his company from the time of leaving Newport (Capt. Batchelder being de- 
tailed at Fort Adams in the recruiting service), and distinguished himself in the valley 
of Mexico. Pie was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct in the bat- 
tles of Contreras and Churubusco. He distinguished himself in the battle of Chepul- 
tepec. His company being in the advance, saddened but undismayed by the fall of 
their gallant Colonel, and no scaling-ladders being at hand, Capt. Bowers placed his 
broad shoulders against the wall of Chepultepec, and cried out: "Now, up, boys, and 
at them! " the boys using his hands and shoulders as so many rounds of a ladder, and 
each getting a toss upward from the stalwart captain as he rushed up the wall. He 
was appointed Captain of the Ninth United States Infantry in December, 1847, and dis- 
charged in August, 1848. He was appointed Postmaster of Nashua by President Pierce 
and re-appointed by President Buchanan. In the war of the rebellion he was appointed 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the Thirteenth Regiment of New-Hampshire Volunteers, Aug. 
22, 1862, and resigned May 30, 1863. Col. Bowers is a gentleman of modest demeanor 
and approved courage. He now resides at Nashua, and is engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. 

Sergt. John Bedel is of Bath, the son of Gen. Moody Bedel. He was born at "In- 
dian Stream Territory" (now Pittsburg), July 8, 1822. He was educated at Newbury 
Seminary, Vermont, and read law with Hon. Harry Hibbard, of Bath. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Grafton County in 1850. He enlisted as a private in the ^Ninth 
Regiment United States Infantry, March 25, 1847; joined Company H. and promoted 
First Sergeant, July 10, 1847 ; discharged on account of physical disability, at Vera 
Cruz, Aug. 8, 1847 ; appointed Second Lieutenant in the Ninth United States Infantry, 
Dec. 30, 1847, and discharged in August. 1848. He was a clerk in one of the depart- 
ments at Washington for some years subsequent to the Mexican war. In 1861. Aug. 
6, he was appointed Major of the Third Regiment of New-Hampshire Volunteer In- 
fantry ; Lieutenant-Colonel of the same, June 27, 1862 ; and Colonel, April 6, 1864. Col. 
Bedel served with distinction in the war ; was taken prisoner, immured for months 
in a rebel prison, and left the army at the close of the war a Brevet Brigadier- 
General for gallant and meritorious conduct on the battle-field. He now resides at 
Bath, with the respect of a large circle of friends, — the citizens of Bath having elected 
him to represent them in the Legislature the present year. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 



337 



Roll of Capt. Stephen Woodman's Company (" C "). 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Remarks. 


Stephen Woodman, Capt. 


Apr. 9, 1847 


During the war 


Absent without leave. 


John H. Jackson,* 1st Lieut 


" 


" 




Thos. P. Pierce, 2d " 


" 


" 




Charles F. Low,* 2d " 


<< 


<< 


On detached service. 


Alfred J. Hill, Sergeant, 


Mar. 2, 1847 


" 


Portsmouth. 


Lewis B. West, " 


29 


a 


Manchester. ■ 


Israel B. Littlerield, " 


Apr. 10 


tt 


Dover. 


John Towle, " 


Apr. 1 


tt 


Dover. 


David H. Marston, Corp., 


Mar. 25 


" 


Portsmouth. 


William H. Reading, " 


Apr. 21 


tt 


Great Falls. 


Benj. H. C. Ricker, " 


Apr. 8 


tt 


Dover. 


Havilar F. Downing, " 


Mar. 25 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


PRIVATES. 








Moses H. Abbot, 


Apr. 7, 1847 


During the war 


Dover. 


Benjamin Andrews, 


5 


" 


Portsmouth. 


Andrew Bicktbrd, 


2 


" 


Dover. 


James Bray, 


5 


tt 


Manchester. . 


William Crown, 


22 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


Jobu Devine, 


Mar. 29 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


Joshua Davis, 


Apr. 5 


« 


M anchester. 


George Dutton, 


26 


" 


Dover. 


Ephraim Drew, 


19 


" 


Dover. 


John Goodall, 


9 


it 


Manchester. 


John M. Goodwin, 


10 


a 


Manchester. 


Joseph Gage, 


20 


«' 


Dover. 


Michael Greeley, 


26 


it 


Dover. 


George G. Goodwin, 


26 


<< 


Somersworth. 


Luther Hovey, 


5 


<< 


Manchester. 


Charles L. Hoyt, 


21 


" 


Somersworth. 


Nathaniel Hanscomb, 


28 


« 


Somersworth. 


Samuel G. Ham, 


5 


<' 


Portsmouth. 


Solomon L. Hays, 


2 


<< 


Dover. 


Joseph us Harris, 


1 


« 


Manchester. 


William P. Huckins, 


9 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


Samuel Kelley, 


15 


« 


Portsmouth. 


Joshua Locke, 


6 


<( 


Dover. 


John G. Langdon, 


20 


« 


Manchester. 


John T. Locke, 


13 


« 


Portsmouth. 


Hiram Lord, 


28 


" 


Dover. 


Carlton P. Langmaid 


5 


« 


Manchester. 


Joseph S. Mathes, 


24 


11 


Dover. 


John F. Marsh, 


26 


<< 


Dover. 


Augustine Morrill, 


5 


<< 


Manchester. 


William J. Mouiser, 


Mar. 27 


(i 


Norridgewalk. 


Marshall Nudd, 


18 


c( 


Gardner. 


Albert Peverly, 


29 


« 


Portsmouth. 


James M. Pushee, 


Apr. 5 


<< 


Manchester. 


Adams Perkins, 


6 


« 


Dover. 


John F. Place, 


Mar. 30 


tt 


Manchester. 


Samuel W. Pinkham, 


Apr. 12 


tt 


Manchester. 


George Parker, 


16 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


William H. Pear, 


21 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


Nahum Russell, 


9 


it 


Dover. 


Charles Robinson, 


2 


tt 


Dover. 


Thaddeus C. Rogers, 


6 


tt 


Manchester. 


Everett Smart, 


2 


tt 


Dover. 


Samuel B. Sanborn, 


15 


" 


Great Falls. 


Nathaniel H. Seavey, 


7 


" 


Dover. 


Dudley Stanton, 


23 


" 


Somersworth. 


John Slade, 


2 


tt 


Portsmouth. 


22 









338 adjutant-general's report. 

Roll of Capt. Woodman's Company — concluded. 



Names. 


When enlisted. 


For what time. 


Residence and Remarks. 


James Stephens, 


Apr. 21,1847 


During the war 


Great Falls. 


John A. Snowden, 


21 


" 


Dover. 


William Thompson, 


Mar. 2 


" 


Portsmouth, 


Sylvester Tennant, 


Apr. 8 


" 


Manchester. 


Barnard A. Thorp, 


6 


ti 


Manchester. 


William H. "Varney, 


17 


t( 


Dover. 


John C. Varney, 


2 


" 


Dover. 


Charles Wentworth, 


3 


" 


Dover. 


James Webber, 


13 


" 


Great Falls. 


Andrew J. Whitehouse, 


26 


<< 


Somersworth. 


Elbridge Wiris, 


13 


" 


Gardner. 



* Lieut. John H. Jackson went out in command of his company. He is the' son of 
John A. H. Jackson, of Portsmouth, and was born at Portsmouth, Oct. 20, 1814. He 
was appointed Lieutenant of the First Company of Light Infantry, First Regiment 
New-Hampshire Militia, April 22,1841; Captain in the same, Sept. 19, 1848; and as 
Colonel of the First Regiment, Dec. 27, 1848. 

He was appointed First Lieutenant of the Ninth Regiment, United States Army, 
April 9, 1847, and accompanied his regiment on its march to the City of Mexico. He 
was in all of the battles in the Valley of Mexico, and was brevetted for gallant services 
on the 19th and 30th of August, 1847, at the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, and 
commissioned Captain Feb. 17, 1848. He was mustered out of service at Newport, R.I., 
in August, 1848. 

After the fall of Chepultepec, the Ninth Regiment pressed forward to the Aqueduct 
under a shower of shot and shells. An escopet-ball struck Lieut. Jackson in the 
breast and glanced off, whizzing upon the ground. It struck a Bible he carried in his 
breast-pocket, the gift of a sister as he left his mother's house. The Bible was found 
deeply but obliquely indented by the ball, where it was obstructed and sent from its 
deadly course. To this incident the Lieutenant owed his life. 

In July, 1853, he was appointed, by Collector Peaslee, Inspector in the Custom-house 
in Boston, and was removed by Collector Goodrich in 1861. On the 6th of August, the 
same, year, he was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the Third Regiment of New-Hamp- 
shire Volunteer Infantry; and Colonel of the same, June 27, 1862; and was honorably 
discharged, Feb. 24, 1864. Jan. 1st, 1867, Colonel Jackson was appointed by Collector 
Goodrich an Inspector in the Boston Custom-house, which office he now holds. 

Lieut. Charles F. Low is the son of General Joseph Low of Concord, and was born 
Jan. 14, 1819. He graduated at Dartmouth in the class of 1812, and entered upon 
the study of theology at the Union Theological Seminary, New- York City, where he 
continued one year ; and subsequently was of the class, for a year and a half, that grad- 
uated in 1845. He then read law in the office of Arthur Fletcher, Esq., of Concord, for 
two years; and subsequently finished his legal studies in New York, with Messrs. 
Sillman andDustin, of that city. He was appointed Second Lieutenant of the Ninth 
United States Infantry. March 11, 1847; and sailed from New York for Vera Cruz on 
the 17th of September, 1847, with eighty-seA T en recruits for that regiment. He was 
discharged in 1848. " After leaving the army, he travelled for a time in California, 
but subsequently returned to New-Hampshire, and is now residing at Concord. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 339 

Gen. Pierce, with Col. Ransom and other officers, and 
three companies of the Ninth Regiment, — " B," Capt. 
Howe's * company of riflemen ; " D," Capt. Kimball's 
company from Vermont; and " K," Capt. Bodfish's grena- 
diers, — sailed from Newport on Thursday, May 27, 1847, 
in the bark " Kepler." The passages of both vessels were 
long and weary, the " North Bend " landing her passengers 
on the 21st, and the " Kepler" on the 27th of June, — a 
month from the time of embarkation. It was the sickly 
season, and the vomito raged in the city. Maj. Lally 
formed his camp at Virgara, two miles from the city, upon 
a sand-beach upon the Gulf. The "Kepler" landed her 
passengers, and they immediately marched to Yirgara and 
encamped on the same beach with Maj. Lally' s force. Gen. 
Pierce soon after pitched his tent on the same beach. 
Great disappointment possessed all minds. The detach- 
ment could have left in three days, had proper arrange- 
ments been made for its march ; but, as it was, almost as 
many weeks were consumed in preparation. Two thousand 
wild mules had been collected to be broken to harness, but 
of these nearly fifteen hundred went off in a stampede the 
day after the landing from the " Kepler," and others had 
to be caught to supply their places. To add to the difficul- 
ties of the position, Adj. Whipple f had been captured by the 
guerillas, and Maj. Lally, Capt. Luff, and others of the 
command were prostrated with the dreaded vomito ; the 
Mexicans asserting continually, and undoubtedly believing, 

* Capt. Theodore F. Howe was born in Portsmouth, Aug. 14, 1810. He was appointed 
Captain of the "Portsmouth Artillery," of the First Regiment, Aug. 20, 1838; Major 
of the First Eegiment, June 22, 1842 ; and Lieutenant-Colonel of the same, June 20 , 
1844. April 9, 1847, he was appointed a Captain in the Ninth (or New England) Regi- 
ment United States Infantry, under command of Col. Franklin Pierce, and accompa- 
nied that officer's command to Puebla, on its way to the City of Mexico. He was left 
at Puebla with some forty or fifty other officers and privates, having been reported by 
the medical examiners as unfit for active duty. Col. Childs, of the First Regiment of 
United States Artillery, was in command as Military Governor. The city was besieged 
by a Mexican army on the 13th of September, under Gen. Rea, and the siege continued 
until the 13th of October. During this time Capt. Rowe had command of the church 
and convent, San Juan Deon, used as a hospital for our sick and wounded soldiers ; and 
Col. Childs, in his report, gives him credit for gallant and efficient service during that 
siege. He was bre vetted Major for this service. For some time Maj. Rowe has been 
laboring under great debility from paralysis. He resides at Salisbury Point, Mass. 

t Thomas J. Whipple is the son of Dr. Thomas Whipple, of Wentworth, and was 
born in that town, Jan. 39, 1816. He received a military education at the University 



340 adjutant-general's report. 

that the greater part of the detachment must perish by 
that malady before it could possibly leave for the interior. 
At length, after labor and fatigue continued and harassing 
for nearly three weeks, on the morning of the 14th of July 
Col. Ransom of the Ninth Regiment, and two companies 
of the Twelfth Regiment under Capt. Wood, left for San 
Juan, on the road to Jalapa. On the next day, a second 
detachment of six companies of infantry (four of the Four- 
teenth and two of the Third Regiment, under the com- 
mand of Lieut.-Col. Hebert) started for San Juan ; and, on 
the 16th of July, Gen. Pierce left the camp at five o'clock, 
p.m., with the Fourth Artillery, Lieut.-Col. Watson's Ma- 
rine Corps, a detachment of the Third Dragoons, and 
about forty wagons. 

The enemy offered no obstruction to the advance of the 
detachments until the first branch of the San Juan was 

at Norwich, Vt., under the instruction of the lamented Col. Ransom. He read law 
with Hon. Josiali Quincy, of Runrney, and settled at Meredith (now Laconia) in the 
practice of his profession. He was appointed First Lieutenant of the Ninth United 
States Infantry, April 9, 1847, and Adjutant of the same in May following. He accom- 
panied the regiment to Vera Cruz, but soon after his arrival, indulging his curiosity in 
examining a Catholic cemetery in the neighborhood, he was unfortunately taken pris- 
oner. He wns in company with private R. H. A. Barnes. When they came to the gate of 
the cemetery, they were met by three Mexicans (who had dismounted from their horses) 
with their escopets pointed at them. Lieut. Whipple was armed with a sword, and 
placed himself at once against the wall, and prepared to defend himself. Barnes, 
unarmed, made the best of his way through the cemetery to the camp. The Mexicans 
drew their swords and made at Whipple, who stoutly defended himself; "but. three 
upon one," one of them hit him a blow upon the head, stunning him, but not injuring 
him, as the blade, meeting a parry, struck flatwise upon the Lieutenant's head. Recov- 
ering himself, he set vigorously at work, when the Mexicans retreated a few paces and 
brought their escopets to bear upon him, making unmistakable signs, which a Yankee 
could understand, that "it is surrender, or we fire." Whipple, thinking that in this 
case " discretion was the better part of valor," gave up, and was led away upon a mus- 
tang, while his own horse was appropriated by his captors. Barnes gave the alarm, 
and a detachment was sent out in search of him, but the guerillas had escaped with 
their captive. Whipple was well treated by them, and was subsequently exchanged, 
and distinguished himself in the battle of Atlixco, where he was volunteer Aide-de- 
camp to Brig. -Gen. Lane. Adj. Whipple resigned Feb. 23, 1848. He resumed his 
practice at Meredith (now Laconia) after the war. He was appointed Adjutant of 
the Twenty-ninth Regiment, Aug. 3, 1848. He was Assistant Clerk of the House of 
Representatives in June, 1848; Clerk in 1849, '50, '51, and '52; and Solicitor for the 
County of Belknap in 1849, '50, '51, and '52. Upon the commencement of the war of 
the rebellion, Capt. Whipple was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of the First Regiment 
New-Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, April 29, 1861, and was mustered out Aug. 9, 
1861. Aug. 20, 1861, Lieut.-Col. Whipple was appointed Colonel of the Fourth Regi- 
ment New- Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, and resigned March 18, 1862. He is now 
in successful practice at Laconia, and withal a pattern farmer. Col. Whipple is an 
able advocate, of sociable manner and infinite jest and humor. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 341 

reached. The guerillas were attempting the destruction 
of the bridge over this stream ; but Col. Ransom's advance 
was upon them before they had accomplished their design, 
and the damage was quickly repaired. 

Mexican guerillas were seen along the road at a safe 
distance after leaving San Juan, and several escopets were 
discharged at the troops in advance ; but the brigade first 
came under the fire of the enemy on the road beyond Telema 
Nueva, on the 20th of July. Mexicans had been discerned 
along the road at distant points, evidently reconnoitring. 
As a train under Col. Mcintosh had been attacked near this 
place and suffered much damage, Gen. Pierce made arrange- 
ments for any such contingency. In a private journal kept 
at the time he says : — 

"I detached Capt. Larkin Smith of the Eighth Infan- 
try, with three companies of infantry and a party of dra- 
goons, by a path on the left of the main road that 
debouched from an old Spanish fort, whence an attack 
was anticipated. A detachment of dragoons under Lieut. 
Deven, Col. Ransom with the Ninth Regiment, and Capt. 
Ridgely with three pieces of his battery, marched on the 
main road. Captain Smith, having traversed the route 
upon which he was directed, again intersected the main 
road near the fort above referred to, a little ahead of the 
advance of our column. In this position, as soon as Capt. 
Smith's detachment had well extended upon the road, the 
enemy opened a brisk fire. They were concealed and 
strongly posted in the chaparral, on both sides of the road, 
the greater number on the right. The fire was promptly 
returned and sustained on both sides for some minutes, 
when Capt. Ridgely unlimbered one of his pieces and threw 
a few canister-shot among them. This immediately silenced 
the enemy's fire, which had been nearly done by Capt. 
Smith before the artillery came up. Capt. Bodfish, with 
three companies of the Ninth Infantry, was sent to attack 
the enemy in flank ; but his flight was too precipitous for 
this detachment to come up with his main body. I could 
not ascertain the enemy's loss. The Mexican paper at 
Jalapa stated it at forty, which I think was an exaggera- 
tion. Our own loss was six wounded, and seven horses 
shot. I witnessed with pleasure the conduct of that part 
of my command immediately engaged on this occasion. 



342 

The first fire of the enemy indicated a pretty formidable 
force, the precise strength of which could not be ascer- 
tained, as they were completely covered by the chaparral. 
It was the first time on the march that any portion of my 
command had fairly been under fire. I was at the head of 
the column on the road, and witnessed the whole scene ; 
saw nothing but coolness and courage on the part of both 
officers and men." 

The brigade continued its march on the afternoon of the 
20th, and encamped for the night at Paso de Orejas, start- 
ing on the following morning, at four o'clock, for Puente 
Nacionale (National Bridge). Says Gen. Pierce in his 
journal : — 

" Puente Nacionale, July 21, . . . Anticipating, from 
rumors which had reached us upon the road, an attack at 
this place, and having no map of its defences, natural or 
artificial, I halted the entire command on the top of the 
long hill which descends to the fork of the Antigua River. 
"With a detail of two companies of the Twelfth Infantry, 
commanded by Capts. Wood and Danvers, I proceeded in 
person two or three hundred yards to an elevation on the 
right of the road, from which with my glass I could com- 
mand a view of the bridge, the village, and the enemy's 
positions. There were a few lancers in the village, riding 
rapidly from one position to another, flourishing a red flag, 
and occasionally, as if in defiance, coming up to the barri- 
cade which they had thrown across the bridge. The main 
body of the enemy, however, was posted behind a tempo- 
rary breastwork on a bluff, a hundred and fifty feet high, 
commanding the whole bridge, and overhanging, as it were, 
the eastern arch. Their position could not be turned, as 
the heights continue precipitous from the water's edge for 
a long distance below. The tongue of land, dividing the 
fork referred to above from the main stream of the Rio del 
Antigua, rises to an immense height on the left ; and on 
this eminence is a fortification, which, from the road, has 
the appearance of great strength. After crossing the 
bridge, the road turns suddenly to the left. Having satis- 
fied myself that this fort on the left was not occupied, I 
sent forward Capt. Dobbins with his company, together with 
Company G, Fourth Infantry, and Company I, Voltigeurs, 
under Capt. Archer, along the brow of the hill to the bank 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 343 

of the Antigua opposite the village, with instructions, if 
possible, to cross the river above. The passage above, 
like that below, being found impracticable, I rode forward 
with my Aide-de-camp, Lieut. Thorn,* to reconnoitre the 
enemy's works more closely, and to find on the left, if pos- 
sible, a position for artillery. In this I was to a certain 
extent successful, and immediately ordered forward three 
pieces, two under the command of Capt. Bidgely, and one 
under Lieut. Getty, of the Fourth Artillery. These were 
stationed on a piece of table-land, perhaps an acre in 
extent, four or five rods from the west end of the main 
bridge, and thirty feet above it. The pieces swept the 
bridge, and dispersed the lancers from the village. Shots 
were also thrown at the heights, but, in consequence of the 
great elevation of the bluff where the enemy's main body 
was posted, without any other effect than to distract his 
fire from the advance, under Col. Bonham, then awaiting 
my orders to cross. This portion of Col. Bonham's com- 
mand consisted of Company B, Twelfth Infantry, under 
Captain Holden; a detachment of the same regiment under 
Lieut. Giles ; two companies of Pennsylvania volunteers 
under Capts. Caldwell and Taylor; Company C, Voltigeurs, 
Lieut. Forsyth ; and Company F, Eleventh Infantry, com- 
manded by Lieutenant Hedges. Under the discharge of 
the artillery of the enemy's works, the command was given 
to Col. Bonham to advance. It was admirably executed. 
Capt. Holden's company, leading, rushed over the bridge 
with a shout; the captain, some paces in advance, leaped 
the barricade of brush and timber, his men following with 
great enthusiasm. 

" Having crossed the bridge, he threw his company under 
the cover of buildings immediately beneath the bluff, and, 
taking a narrow steep path to the right, was in a few 
moments upon the summit, when the whole brigade greeted 
him with hearty cheers. The remainder of the command 
followed rapidly, and in good order. In the mean time, 
with a view to cut off the retreat of the foe, Capt. Dupreau, 
of the Third Dragoons, had leaped the barricade, dashed 
through the village, and, almost simultaneously with Capt. 
Holden, planted the colors of his company upon the breast- 

* Lieut. George Thorn is the son of James Thorn, Esq., of Derry (see page 218), and 
graduated at West Point in the class of 1839; Brevet Second Lieutenant Topographical 
Engineers, July 1, 1839; Aide-de-camp to Gen. Pierce on his march to Puebla in 1847; 
and promoted First Lieutenant, September, 1849. Mr. Thorn is still in the service, and 
distinguished; being the General Thorn of the Union Army in the war of the Great 
Rebellion. 



344 

work from which the plunging fire had so recently ceased. 
The guerillas and lancers could hardly have waited, after 
the first shout of Holden's company, to see the effect of 
their own fire ; for, before our first detachment reached their 
works, they were in full flight, beyond pursuit, in the dense 
chaparral of the mountains in their rear. 

" Col. Bonham's horse was shot near me, and I received 
an escopet-ball through the brim of my hat, but without 
other damage than leaving my head, for a short time, with- 
out protection from the sun. The balls pattered like hail- 
stones around us at the moment the column advanced ; and 
it seems truly wonderful that so few took effect. A large 
portion of them passed over our heads, and struck between 
the rear of Col. Bonham's command and the main body of 
the brigade, two or three hundred yards behind with the 
train, thus verifying what has so often been said by our 
gallant fellows within the last forty days, that i the nearer 
you get to these people in fight, the safer.' The encamp- 
ment was made in the village for the night, thirty miles 
from Vera Cruz. Here Gen. Santa Anna has a spacious 
and magnificent hacienda, in which I established my head- 
quarters. 

"July 22. — I left the princely hacienda of Santa Anna, at 
the Natural Bridge, this morning at four o'clock. The 
moment our picket-guards were withdrawn, the enemy 
appeared on all the surrounding heights, but at distances 
too respectful to provoke any particular notice. I proceeded 
on the march without molestation, until we commenced the 
descent of the Plan del Rio, where Capt. Dupreau's com- 
pany of cavalry, a few hundred yards in front of the column, 
was fired upon from the chaparral, and three horses 
wounded. Lieut.-Col. Hebert, being next to the dragoons, 
threw out a company of skirmishers on either side, and, 
with the remainder, continued the march on the main road. 
Nothing more, however, was seen or heard of the enemy. 
An old Spanish fort stands on a high eminence at the right 
of the road, commanding it in all directions, and overlook- 
ing the bridge. A bridge about four hundred yards west 
of the main stream had been barricaded, evidently with the 
intention of defending it. But neither the fort nor the 
position beyond the barricade was occupied ; the enemy, as 
we soon learned, having hit upon another expedient for 
checking our advance, which they evidently believed must 
cause several weeks' detention, and probably drive the com- 
mand back upon the coast. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 345 

" Removing the barricade at the small bridge, and pro- 
ceeding about four hundred yards, we came to the Plan del 
Rio, over which there had been a bridge similar to Puente 
Nacionale. It was a magnificent structure of art, combining 
great strength and beauty, a work of the old Spaniards, so 
many of which are found upon this great avenue from the 
coast, fitted to awaken the admiration and wonder of the 
traveller. The fact that the main arch, a span of about 
sixty feet, had been blown up, first burst upon me as I stood 
upon the brink of the chasm, with a perpendicular descent 
of nearly a hundred feet to the bed of a rapid stream, much 
swollen by the recent rains. As far as the eye could reach, 
above and below, the banks on the west side, of vast height, 
descended precipitously almost in a perpendicular line to 
the water's edge. 

" This sudden and unexpected barrier, I need not say, 
was somewhat withering to the confidence with which I had 
been animated. The news having extended back along the 
line, my officers soon crowded around me ; and the deep 
silence that ensued was more significant than anything 
which could have been spoken. After a few moments' 
pause, this silence was broken by many short epigram- 
matical remarks, and more questions. 

"' We have it before us now!' said Lieut.-Col. Hebert. 
' The destruction of this magnificent and expensive work of 
a past generation could not have been ordered but upon 
deliberate and firm purpose of stern resistance.' 'This 
people have destroyed,' said another, 'what they never will 
rebuild.' ' What is to be done with this train ? ' ' What 
do you propose now, General ? ' 'To have it closed up,' I 
replied, ' as compactly as possible, to-night, and to cross to- 
morrow with every wagon.' But I confess there was no 
very distinct idea in my own mind how the thing was to 
be accomplished. 

"I ought to have mentioned that the Ninth Infantry, 
under the gallant Col. Ransom, which was that day in 
advance, on discovering that the bridge had been blown 
up, and supposing the enemy to be in force on the other, 
side, immediately descended the steep banks, by the aid of 
trees and other supports, and forded the river. They then 
took possession of a church on the other side. 

"A long hill descends from the west towards this river; 
the road is narrow, and there is no ground for an encamp- 
ment, or the packing of wagons. The wagons, therefore, 
having been closed up, were of necessity left in the wood, 



346 adjutant-general's report. 

making a line of more than a mile and a half in length. 
Thus disposed, every precaution was taken for the protection 
of the train, and the brigade was left to bivouac. 

" The growth for miles around was low and scrubby, afford- 
ing no timber to reconstruct the arch ; and it was perfectly 
apparent that no passage could be effected at the north. 
Lieut. Thorn, and two or three scientific officers with him, 
had been occupied from the time of our arrival in making 
a careful reconnoissance down the banks of the river for 
two or three miles below. At dark they reported that the 
difficulties in that direction did not diminish, but that a 
road might probably be constructed down the bank, some 
hundred yards south of the bridge. Weary and not in the 
most buoyant spirits, we all sunk to repose. 

" Early the next morning I sent for Capt. Bodfish, of the 
Ninth Infantry, an officer of high intelligence and force of 
character. He had been engaged for many years in the 
lumber business, and accustomed to the construction of 
roads in the wild and mountainous districts of Maine, and 
was withal a man not likely to be checked by slight obsta- 
cles in the accomplishment of an enterprise. It occurred 
to me, therefore, that he was the very man whose services 
should, on this occasion, be put in requisition. 

" Being informed of the object for which he had been 
called, he retired, and, returning in half an hour, said that 
he had examined the ground, and that the construction of 
a road, over which the train might safely pass, was practi- 
cable. 'What length of time,' he was asked, 'will neces- 
sarily be occupied in the completion of the work?' 'That,' 
said he, ' will depend upon the number of men employed. 
If you will give me five hundred men, I will furnish you a 
road over which the train can pass safely in four hours.' 
The detail was immediately furnished, and, at the end of 
three hours, the energetic and most deserving officer re- 
ported to me that the road was ready for the wagons. For- 
tune favored us in more respects than one. The water in 
the river, which in the rainy season is a rapid and unfordable 
stream, fell one and a half feet from the time of our arrival 
to the hour of the completion of the work. ' Bodfish's 
road ' (unless this nation shall be regenerated) will be the 
road, at that place, for Mexican diligences for half a century 
to come. 

u Without removing an article from a single wagon, the 
entire train had passed without accident before the sun 
went down on the evening of the 23d. Here on the east 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 347 

side of Plan del Rio, where there are barracks and many 
ranches, we are comfortably quartered for the night. The 
troops are in the highest spirits, and jokes innumerable 
are passing among our Southern brethren upon the absur- 
dity of Mexicans attempting to play such a trick on Yankees. 
The heat had been so excessive that I intended to remain 
one day at this place for the refreshment of men and an- 
imals ; but all are anxious to proceed, and we move in the 
morning. Thus the destruction of this very expensive 
work, instead of retarding my progress for a single hour, 
has added fresh confidence and enthusiasm to the command." 

The guerillas had been so punished by Pierce's com- 
mand, and their attacks, barricades of bridges, and destruc- 
tion of the National Bridge had caused his brigade so little 
delay, that they left him to pursue his way unmolested ; and 
in the march by Cerro Gordo, and through Jalapa and Perote 
to Puebla, the enemy made no show of resistance. On the 
7th of August, Gen. Pierce entered Puebla with his brigade 
in fine spirits, not having lost a single wagon upon the 
route, and in such good condition that Gen. Scott deter- 
mined upon an immediate onward movement ; and the 
next morning, Gen. Twiggs, with the ordnance, commenced 
his march upon the City of Mexico. Gen. Scott left the 
same day, and joined Gen. Twiggs upon the road. On the 
third day of its march, the American army passed Rio Frio, 
the noted pass of the highest point of land on the national 
road between Mexico and Yera Cruz, and ten thousand feet 
above the level of the ocean. 

Gen. Scott had determined to approach the city by the 
national road, though careful reconnoissances had shown it 
strongly defended, and the plan of approach had been 
made, — the order of march to be reversed, Gen. Worth's 
division in the advance, and that of Twiggs in the rear; and 
Worth's division had actually advanced some distance upon 
the road, when Noah E. Smith, an American long resident 
in Mexico, and who had fled from that city and joined the 
army, informed Gen. Worth that a road south of Lake 
Chalco was practicable. He knew the ground, as he had 
passed over it in his hunting excursions. This information 



348 adjutant-general's report. 

was immediately communicated to Gen. Scott, a reconnois- 
sance ordered, and the ground found as Mr. Smith had rep- 
resented. Gen. Worth's division was set in motion from 
Chalco on the 15th of August south of the lake, and, fol- 
lowing the trail pointed out by Mr. Smith, made it passable 
for artillery and wagon train, and arrived at San Augustine 
on the 17th of August ; thus avoiding the strongly fortified 
works at El Penon, the Causeway, and Mexicalcingo,* and 
preventing a great sacrifice of human life, and very possibly 
securing our victories in the Y alley of Mexico : and all 
this was owing to the praiseworthy efforts of a patriotic son 
of New-Hampshire ! f 

As soon as Santa Anna discovered that Gen. Scott was 
cutting a way for himself south of Lake Chalco, to reach 
the Acapulco road leading from the south into the city, he 
moved the larger part of his forces to San Antonio and its 
neighborhood, and made the best disposition of them in his 
power to stay the approach of Gen. Scott to the city. Gen- 

* There were twenty batteries at El Penon, mounting fifty-one guns, and, in addi- 
tion, fifteen breastworks for infantry; and at Mexicalcingo there were eight batteries, 
and one breastwork for infantry. In addition, some four hundred rods from El Penon, 
toward the city, there were two strong batteries commanding the Causeway. 

t Noah E. Smith, Esq., is a native of Gilmanton, in this State. He had resided in 
Mexico for nearly twenty years, and had amassed a fortune. Upon the commencement 
of serious difficulties between our government and Mexico, Mr. Smith prepared for 
the result, and arranged his affairs accordingly. He had been twice driven from Mex- 
ico, suspected by the Mexicans of an undue regard for his countrymen, — the last time 
on account of his assistance afforded to Cols. Gaines and Borland, and the soldiers of their 
commands, taken at Encarnacion, and then confined in a dungeon in the City of Mexico. 
Bribing a guerilla chief, with six of his desperadoes, to assist him, he escaped over the 
mountains, and joined Gen. Scott at Puebla two days before the arrival of the re- 
enforcements under Gen. Pierce. He accompanied the army back to Mexico, and gave 
important information as to the route. When the army arrived at Chalco, he informed 
Gen. Worth of the trail south of Lake Chalco, and, acting upon his information, the 
strong positions upon the national road were turned. 

Mr. Smith left Mexico Avith our army, and returned to his native State. He is a 
patriotic and noble man". Maj. Gaines, of Kentucky (who had been captured with Maj. 
Borland and some seventy cavalry from Kentucky and Arkansas, at Encarnacion. just 
before the battle of Buena Vista, and had been for a long time immured in a Mexican 
prison), in a speech made in Boston in 1848, thus photographed, with the hand of an 
artist, the character of Mr. Smith: "I have been," said Maj. Gaines, "to Xew- 
Hampshire. I went there on a pilgrimage. I went there to pay my respects 
and pour out my gratitude to a New-Hampshire man, whom I met in Mexico, or 
rather who met me ; who visited me in my dungeon, who tound me there ' naked and 
he clothed me, sick and in prison, and he ministered unto me.' I went there to render 
him my gratitude for kindnesses done me in a far-distant land." Mr. Smith still resides 
in Gilmanton, enjoying, as he deserves, the respect of the community in the highest 
degree. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 349 

Valencia occupied the heights of Contreras, intrenched 
himself, and planted his batteries. On the 19th of August 
commenced the series of battles for the mastery in the Val- 
ley of Mexico, — with that of Contreras. Let a participa- 
tor in all of them tell of the triumph of the American 
arms : — 



" We remained in Puebla until the 10th, when the Third 
Division, of which the Ninth is a part, commenced its 
march toward the Aztec city;, the other commands having 
already gone, Gen. Twiggs leaving the day after our arrival. 
The whole effective force under Gen. Scott, on leaving 
Puebla, was seventy-live hundred men ; and this mere 
handful was to be thrown into the very heart of the enemy's 
country, hallowed by all those associations which always 
cling around the capital of a nation. At Chalco, the army 
halted for several days. This place is eighteen miles from 
the City of Mexico. Here Gen. Scott determined to take 
a circuitous route, thus avoiding some strong fortifications, 
which to attempt to reduce might endanger the whole army. 
Many points on the road over which we passed might have 
been fortified to advantage ; but Santa Anna, considering 
the road impracticable, had neglected it. We passed through 
several villages, the inhabitants of which had fled with all 
their movable effects to the mountains. On the 17th of 
August we arrived at San Augustine. We had passed 
nearly round the city to find the most available point to 
attack, but we could pause no longer ; it must now be vic- 
tory or death. Our provisions were exhausted ; the army 
was without money and without credit. To remedy this, 
the city must be within our power. Accordingly, on the 
19th of August, we were ordered to dislodge the enemy 
from the position they occupied on the heights of Contreras, 
where they had a force of sixteen thousand men, and twenty- 
three heavy pieces of artillery, besides four large mortars. 
The Ninth and four companies of the Twelfth passed to 
the left of the enemy's batteries over the pedrogal (rough 
volcanic grounds, so full of fissures and chasms that the 
enemy considered it impassable), scrambling along as best 
we could ; the shells and grape of twenty cannon, besides 
the balls of thousands of muskets, showering down among 
us. And I would here mention the gallantry of Gen. 
Pierce, who rode boldly forward, urging us on, not only in 
word, but by example. Unfortunately his horse stumbled 



350 adjutant-general's report. 

on the rough ground, throwing his rider, who was injured 
severely. Though scarcely able to stand, he again took the 
field m the morning, leading us on to Churubusco ; but so 
severe was the injury he had received, that he became 
exhausted and fell from his horse. As an officer, New Eng- 
land may well be proud of her Pierce, and the old Granite 
State can behold with delight the deeds of her favorite son. 
At last we found shelter from the enemy's fire in a deep 
ravine, where we remained till night. In the mean time, 
two spies were taken, one of whom, in attempting to escape, 
was run through the body by Capt. Wood of the Twelfth. 
Towards night a cold, drizzling rain came on, and, without 
a mouthful of food since morning, we rolled ourselves up 
for the night. Just after dark, the danger of our position 
becoming known to the commander, we were ordered to 
retire to a position more secure. The troops in our rear 
had been drawn off, leaving about three hundred of us 
within musket-shot of the enemy's works, and in such a 
situation that the enemy could easily have taken us by sur- 
prise ; and, had they known our exact position, we should 
either have been cut down defending our lives, or fell into 
their hands as prisoners. The rain poured down in tor- 
rents as we silently commenced our retreat, feeling our way 
along in the darkness, as best we could, over a path which 
the enemy considered impassable even by daylight. Finally 
we halted, covered with mud, our clothes wet to the skin, 
and our blankets no better. In this situation you can 
imagine how we passed the night better than I can describe 
it. The enemy thought, because he retained possession of 
his position, that we were defeated, and during the night 
Valencia sent off couriers in various directions to announce 
his victory over the Yankees ; but his enjoyment of success 
was brief, for with the morning came the charge, and, after 
a short but bloody fight, the enemy fled in all directions, a 
large number of whom were subsequently cut off and made 
prisoners. Twenty-three splendid brass pieces, two of 
which had been captured at Buena Vista, and four large 
mortars, fell into our hands, besides an immense amount of 
ammunition and arms. Our loss in killed and wounded, I 
regret to say, was large, but the enemy suffered much more 
severely. At some places on the field, the sight was truly 
horrible. In one place, containing about three hundred 
and sixty square feet, the dead and dying lay piled 
together to the number of fifty-seven men, and here amidst 
this scene of carnage was also the dead body of a woman ! 



MILITARY HISTORY OF NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 351 

"This morning (the 20th), in the absence of the senior 
officer (caused by sickness), I had the pleasure of leading 
the New-Hampshire boys (the largest company present in 
the regiment) on to the charge. They behaved gallantly, 
doing great credit to themselves for their coolness and 
intrepidity, so much so as to gain the applause of the gal- 
lant Ransom. Those of the enemy that escaped the gen- 
eral carnage of Contreras fled to Churubusco, where they 
had a large force strongly posted in a convent. To this 
place we pursued them, and, on the same day that brought 
the battle of Contreras to a close with such a glorious 
result (the 20th of August), we also achieved the glorious 
victory of Churubusco. Our force engaged here was not 
over six thousand ; that of the enemy, about thirty thou- 
sand. For three hours was heard the deafening roar of 
artillery and musketry, mingled with the groans of the 
wounded and dying. Our troops were cut to pieces in all 
directions, but, nothing daunted, they pressed bravely for- 
ward, carrying the enemy's batteries at the point of the 
bayonet. 

" We captured all their cannon, consisting of twenty or 
thirty fine pieces, also a large number of prisoners, among 
whom were eighty deserters from our army. In this battle, 
Sergt. Lewis B. West, of Manchester, was mortally wounded. 
He fell by my side, crying out to me as he threw down his 
gun, ' Poor West is shot,' and in about twenty minutes he 
expired. Sergt. West was a good soldier, and fought 
bravely at Contreras ; he was beloved both by officers and 
men ; and, while his friends will mourn his loss, they will 
have the satisfaction to know that he fell in his country's 
service while bravely doing his duty to her as a citizen and 
soldier.* The victories of Contreras and Churubusco opened 

* Aside from West, there were other brave soldiers in the ranks, from New-Hamp- 
shire, who fell in the Valley of Mexico. There were three brave soldiers from Concord, 
worthy of particular notice, — Henry F. Carswell, John C. Stowell, and Ezra T. Pike. 
The three Avere printers in the office of the "New-Hampshire Patriot." Of these, 
Stowell had been Captain, and Carswell Lieutenant, of the noted "Columbian Artillery," 
attached to the Eleventh Regiment. Carswell was from Portsmouth ; Stowell was a 
native of Ashburnham, Mass. ; and Pike was a native of Haverhill. Of these brave 
men, Gen. Pierce thus spoke in a public speech in Concord, soon after his return from 
Mexico: "There was private Henry F. Carswell, whose gallantry was marked, and 
who entered Mexico in perfect health, never having been touched or harmed in a single 
battle, but died suddenly of fever. Sergt. Stowell, another printer, was shot plumb 
through the chest. I thought, " said the General, "that he could not live an hour; 
but when I found him at the convent,, the next day, he was blessed with a clear mind 
and unflinching fortitude. He said, ' General, it is all over with me; will you write 
home?' but added a thought, the first and last with the army, ' Did the boys speak of 
me? Did they say whether I behaved well?' And this was the spirit, the unparalleled 



352 adjutant-general's report. 

the way to the city, but Gen. Scott paused to offer the 
enemy one more chance to accept an honorable peace before 
he planted the stars and stripes on the National Palace. 
An armistice was agreed upon ; commissioners on the part 
of the two countries met to negotiate terms of peace. But 
the ink was scarcely dry on the paper before the armistice 
was broken. Santa Anna, in direct violation of the agree- 
ment he had entered into, at once commenced collecting 
his scattered troops, putting the city in a state of defence, 
&c. So open had the violation become, that, on the 7th of 
September, Gen. Scott informed Gen. Santa Anna that the 
armistice was terminated. Gen. Scott had received infor- 
mation that the enemy were casting cannon out of the bells 
of the city at a foundry near by, known as ' Molino del 
Key,' and he determined to destroy it. The foundry was 
strongly fortified ; defended not only by its own guns, but 
by those of the Castle of Chepultepec. A large body of 
troops was also stationed within the walls, which could be 
increased by fifteen thousand, either from the castle or city. 
On the 8th of September the attack was made, and word 
came that Gen. Worth's division was hard pushed. Gen. 
Scott rode up to General Pierce, who was at the right of 
the Ninth, and ordered him to relieve Gen. Worth at 
once. This order was obeyed, and the Ninth and Second 
Infantry moved up, under Gen. Pierce, by a happy manoeu- 
vre, in the face of fifteen thousand of the enemy, and under 
a most destructive fire. The enemy's works were carried 
at the point of the bayonet, but it was a bloody and dear- 
bought victory, costing the life of many a gallant soldier. 
Among those severely wounded was Lieut. Foster, of 
Nashua, whom I have just paid a visit, and find fast recover- 
ing. 

" From the 8th until the 12th of September, a general 
gloom overspread the American army. The victory of the 
eighth amounted almost to a defeat. We had lost two 

spirit, which secured to us victory, and gave us possession of the city. And there 
was Sergt. Pike, who, having behaved with distinguished gallantry in all the preced- 
ing engagements, fell pressing up on the Causeway to the gate Belen. He was in one 
of the arches of the Aqueduct, when a bomb from the castle exploded, and killed every 
man in it except Pike, and his leg was literally torn off by the shell, but worse by the 
pretended amputations that followed. The bone of his thigh was found protruding 
two inches two or three days after. There was a second amputation. Some defect 
made a third necessary. When I called," said the General," upon the Sergeant and said, 
' I fear you are not able to endure another amputation now,' Pike replied, ' I can, sir. 
I have made my mind up to it. I want it taken off to-day, and, when they cut it oft 
again, I hope they will cut it so that it will stay cut!'" Such was the indomitable 
spirit of our soldiers in a foreign land that gave them victory. 



MILITARY HISTORY OP NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 353 

thousand brave soldiers ; and the enemy still retained pos- 
session of the city and the heights of Chepultepec. On the 
12th commenced the bombardment of the latter place, 
which continued through the day, but with little effect. 
Gen. Pierce, during this bombardment, at the head of the 
First and Third Brigades of the division, gallantly held in 
check a large body of lancers on our left.* In the after- 
noon Gen. Pillow rode up to where our regiment lay, and, 
calling the boys around him, he raised his arm, and, point- 
ing toward the heights of Chepultepec, exclaimed : ' To- 
morrow, if you say it, the star-spangled banner floats up 
yonder. If New England would place her name on the 
bright page of history, now is her time. You of the Ninth, 
if you will, shall lead in the charge. None need volunteer 
who will not swear to enter that castle yonder, or die.' 
We waited no longer, but, almost to a man, desired to see 
the inside of Chepultepec, rending the air with shouts for 
Pillow and victory. As the General was about to retire, he 
extended his hand to Col. Ransom, who grasped it warmly, 
saying, ' I pledge my word to lead my regiment into that 
castle, or die.' 

" The morning of the 12th of September, about eight 
o'clock, the charge commenced, and in half an hour we oc- 
cupied the heights, the stars and stripes waving over us. 
The two New-Hampshire companies, who beh